THE DON JONES INDEX…

 

GAINS POSTED in GREEN

LOSSES POSTED in RED

 

         9/25/17…  15,605/44

9/18/17…  15,620.12

6/27/13…  15,000.00

 

 

 (THE DOW JONES INDEX: 9/25/17… 22,349.59; 9/18/17… 22,268.34; 6/27/13… 15,000.00)

 

LESSON for September 25, 2017 – A SHORT LURCH FORWARD in the WAYBACK MACHINE!

 

In our compilation of things that make people happy (or not), our inspiration was the World Happiness Report, a survey of the nations of the world and an estimation of whether their people were happy (or not) – upon which we reported and listed in our Lesson of June 19th.

The impetus for this exploration was the attack, upon Republican Congressmen playing baseball in a public domain, by one James Hodgkinson, a Bernie Sanders campaign worker.  Steve Scalise, from Louisiana was seriously injured and remains largely incapacitated… the incident set off a firestorm of naming and blaming.  Ads linking the shooting to the Democratic Party were hastily prepared and aired in a Georgia special election where a boy-toy named Jon Ossoff attempted to capture the magic and red-state miraculousness of Justin Trudeau and Emile Macron against an orthodox and uncharismatic Republican named Karen Handel.  The chaining did its work – Handel was elected.  And the media had another feast… pontificating upon happiness and disgruntlement; partisans on either side blaming their miserable others for the covfefe.

Which inspired us to wonder – were Americans so angry and unhappy compared to the rest of the world?  After all, a great majority of us had more money than the average Somalian, most had cell phones and “The Big Bang Theory” – some of us even had premium cable, organic quinoa bread and SUVs.  But what, after all, defines happiness.

Attempting to answer that question was… the United Nations!  Those double-parking, America-hating eggheads who poured our overfat dues payments into surveys and studies… one of which was the WHR.  (Another study of individual American cities… heavily weighted towards diversity and multiculturalism and taken by Gallup… was also mentioned.)

So here is a reprint of the pertinent facts and findings from that lesson…

 

Every March 20th… World Happiness Day… the U.N. issues its rankings of national happiness – in this case, judging 155 countries (including the likes of Hong Kong and Taiwan – deemed part of the People’s Republic whether they like it or not, and Palestine).

We have already noted that the United States did not finish atop world freedom rankings.

So, is Don Jones part of the happiest nation on earth?

No.

Well, at least did America finish in the top five?  The top ten?  Nope.

Twenty?

Yes.  We finished fourteenth – a damn sight better than we did in the three freedom indices compiled by Freedom House (of the population), Reporters Without Borders (of the press) and the Heritage Foundation (of the corporate state).

 

The first World Happiness Report was published in April, 2012, in support of the UN High Level Meeting on happiness and well-being. Since then the world has come a long way. Increasingly, happiness is considered to be the proper measure of social progress and the goal of public policy. In June 2016 the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) committed itself “to redefine the growth narrative to put people’s well-being at the center of governments’ efforts”.

In February 2017, WHR states in its introduction, the United Arab Emirates held a full-day World Happiness meeting, as part of the World Government Summit. “Now on World Happiness Day, March 20th, we launch the World Happiness Report 2017, once again back at the United Nations, again published by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network, and now supported by a generous three-year grant from the Ernesto Illy Foundation.”

U.N. surveyors questioned “roughly 3000 respondents in each of more than 150 countries… asking them to evaluate their current lives on a ladder where 0 represents the worst possible life and 10 the best possible.”  Results were plotted on what they called a “Cantril ladder” – a literal elevation of the elect over the miserable (which is roughly congruent to the freedom indices, although with some exceptions),

They found a “happiness gap” of about four points separating the top ten finishers from the bottom ten hellholes; which turned out to be the usual war-torn, disease and famine-plagued African states plus a few places like Haiti, Afghanistan and Syria; three quarters of which could be explained by six variables. Half of this sum was “due to differences in having someone to count on, generosity, a sense of freedom, and freedom from corruption. The other half of the explained difference is attributed to GDP per capita and healthy life expectancy, both of which, as the report explains, also depend importantly on the social context.”

The six underlying variables named by WHR were: log income per capita (lgdp), healthy life expectancy

(hle), social support (ssup), freedom to make life choices (freedom), generosity of donations (donation), and perceived corruption of government and business (corruption). Of these sources, two involve personal material conditions (lgdp, hle); one focuses on individual values (donation); and two involve social capital (ssup, corruption).

“The last, freedom, should be interpreted as a combination of individual factors (wealth, skills) and social factors (democracy, civil rights, and social rights),” concluded researcher Sachs (below) and might probably be disputed by the Heritage Foundation.

 

Being politically correct, the researchers declined to identify the overriding factor in their findings – skin color.  Descending the ladder of happiness, the whitest of white people were up there with the bluebirds, then came other Western nations like those of southern and eastern Europe and the multicultural USA (along with a few outliers like Israel, Chile and Costa Rica).  Brown and yellow populations were further down… the recession-plagued Japanese could manage only 51st, the nervous South Koreans 55th (North Korea was not mentioned, probably because any UN bureaucrat foolish to fly in and start asking questions was likely to be taken away and shot) and, despite their much-touted economic miracle, the Chinese were 79th and India was way down at 122nd.  And the African republics occupied the basement… the unhappiest places on Earth (even worse than Syria) were Tanzania, Burundi and the Central African Republic.

Much like the freedom people, the happiness people determined that… contrary to the stereotypes of somber, gloomy Scandinavians… the most joyful places in the world were the small, cold (but wealthy) nations of North Europe.  Norway topped the global happiness report, followed by Denmark, Iceland and Switzerland.  “All of the top four countries rank highly on all the main factors found to support happiness,” concluded the UN, “caring, freedom, generosity, honesty, health, income and good governance.”

Switzerland isn’t Scandinavian, but it is cold, white and rich and free… at least in its banking system.  The remainder of the top ten were Finland, followed by the Netherlands, Canada, New Zealand (which, thanks to the Heritage Foundation) topped the combined personal, press and economic (corporate) freedom roster.  Australia and Sweden tied for the 9th position, having the same 2014-2016 score to three decimals.

“Norway moves to the top of the ranking despite weaker oil prices,” opined the UN.  “It is sometimes said that Norway achieves and maintains its high happiness not because of its oil wealth, but in spite of it. By choosing to produce its oil slowly, and investing the proceeds for the future rather than spending them in the present, Norway has insulated itself from the boom and bust cycle of many other resource-rich economies. To do this successfully requires high levels of mutual trust, shared purpose, generosity and good governance, all factors that help to keep Norway and other top countries where they are in the happiness rankings.”

And America?

The central paradox of the modern American economy, wrote Jeffrey D. Sachs (identified as Director of The Center for Sustainable Development at The Earth Institute, Columbia University, and the Sustainable Development Solutions Network, and Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General) is that “income per person has increased roughly three times since 1960, but measured happiness has not risen. The situation has gotten worse in recent years: per capita GDP is still rising, but happiness is now actually falling.”  (Perhaps the relative underperformance of the Don as opposed to the Dow over the last four years may be taken into account, although the Don has remained above its benchmark.)

If we compare the two-year average 2015/16 U.S. score on the Cantril ladder with the two-year average for 2006/7,” Sachs wrote, “we can see that the Cantril score declined by 0.51. While the US ranked  third among the 23 OECD countries surveyed in 2007, it had fallen to 19th of the 34 OECD countries surveyed in 2016.”

And then, the author ripped off his shirt to proudly display his bodysuit with the prominent letter “L” (for Liberalman) displayed; “America’s crisis is, in short, a social crisis,” he concluded, “not an economic crisis.”

The Hillary Clinton campaign, as well as numerous Democratic Congressmen, state and local officials in America’s Rust Belt states of Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania jumped to the same conclusions… and reaped an electoral backlash from the ignorant peasants with the temerity to be worrying about their prospects.

“This America(n) social crisis is widely noted,” Sachs doubled down, “but it has not translated into public policy. Almost all of the policy discourse in Washington DC centers on naïve attempts to raise the economic growth rate, as if a higher growth rate would somehow heal the deepening divisions and angst in American society. This kind of growth-only agenda is doubly wrong-headed.  First, most of the pseudo-elixirs for growth— especially the Republican Party’s beloved nostrum of endless tax cuts and voodoo economics— will only exacerbate America’s social inequalities and feed the distrust that is already tearing society apart. Second, a forthright attack on the real sources of social crisis would have a much larger and more rapid beneficial effect on U.S. happiness.”

Perhaps true – but Americans aren’t yet willing to be told so by a bunch of pointy-headed bureaucrats from the Godless, anti-American UN.

The Sachs report projected that… given a per capita GDP of $53,000 for every American… reversing the increase in the corruption index (which rose by 0.10 between 2006/7 and 2015/6) would have the same effect on national happiness as raising the GDP to $62,000.  Reversing the decline in America’s social support networks would raise it to $82,000 while the combined effect of decay in the four social variables (ssup, freedom, donation, corruption) is a reduction of happiness of 0.31points, as would require a rising GDP to around $133,000 to offset the combined deterioration of social capital.

“It is of course well-known that social capital in the United States has been in decline for several decades now,” lamented Sachs, citing Robert Putnam’s “pioneering research played a major role in opening the eyes of Americans to the fraying of social ties” (but failing to admit that the major chunk of this deterioration has occurred under the wandering eye of President Obama).  “In recent years, the evidence of social crises has become overwhelming, across every aspect of social life. A small group at the top of the income distribution has continued to make striking gains in wealth and income, while the rest of society has faced economic stagnation or decline, worsening public health indicators including rising rates of drug addiction and suicide, and declining social trust.”

With both political parties chasing Wall Street and corporate money like so many drunk and deluded Irishmen chasing leprechauns, what else could one expect?

Sachs is not the first, nor will he be the last, to rail against inequality, corruption, crime, a broken for-profit healthcare industry and the concomitant retreat into nativism, tribalism and downright racism as a last line of defense for the beleaguered voters.  “American exceptionalism may be linked to relatively high levels of heterogeneity combined with the pronounced segregation of cities in the United States compared with other Western countries …and the persistence of ethnic inqualities.” (See Van der Meer, T. and Tolsma, J. (2014). Ethnic Diversity and its Effects on Social Cohesion in the Annual Review of Sociology 2014, 40: 459-478).  There is nothing objectionable (to the 99%) in any of Mister (Doctor?) Sachs’ recommendations (campaign finance reform, open borders, more handouts to the poor financed by higher taxes, even more money for education), but they are delusional under the current two-party system.  One may well turn to the concluding chapters of Rep. Parnell’s Entropy and Renaissance for a concise and attainable alternative.

The UN’s China correspondent, Richard A. Easterlin waxed global when treating the sudden rise of the Chinese industrial colossus and its relative moderation considering the country’s enormous population and a business ethic that, in the mirror image of Maoism, puts profits above people.  Factories open or close, whole villages prosper or suffer at the whim of the international markets and the downward pressure placed upon workers by even poorer, hungrier places like Vietnam or Africa or the employees of last resort: robots.

“Why are unemployment and the social safety net so important?” asks Easterlin,  These two factors bear most directly on the concerns foremost in shaping personal happiness—income security, family life, and the health of oneself and one’s family.  It is these concerns that are typically cited by people worldwide when asked an open-ended question as to what is important for their happiness.   In contrast, broad societal matters such as inequality, pollution, political and civil liberties, international relations, and the like, which most individuals have little ability to influence, are rarely mentioned. Abrupt changes in these conditions may affect happiness, but for the most part, such circumstances are taken as given. The things that matter most are those that take up most people’s time day after day, and which they think they have, or should have, some ability to control.”

It might be said that ordinary Chinese are less consumed with goings-on outside their immediate circle of family, workplace and community; that their access to information about long-term trends that might affect these is compromised by poverty and/or government obfuscation.  But there is also a generation gap – compounded by the demographic influences of a smaller millennial generation whose upbringing has been radically different from that of their parents.

What has been less publicized is the Chinese inflation rate, which has been high and, in some years (2008, for example) even exceeded the rise in the GDP.  Among the many charts and graphs in Easterlin’s report is one which plots the happiness of the upper third of the population… rising through 1995, static thereafter until 2005 and the beginnings of a sharp decline against that of the bottom third; the result being exactly the opposite, leading to the inference that in China, at least, happiness relative to politics and economics is a zero-sum game.

As opposed to China, Africa is experiencing a demographic explosion leading to what researchers Valerie Møller and Benjamin Roberts of South Africa, Algerian Habib Tiliouine and Jay Loschky of Gallup call a “youth bulge” with both positive and negative effects.  The negatives are obvious, more and more people diminish the value of labor and poverty and unemployment are rising, but the authors suggest that the growing demands from this new generation might impact the authority of the “Big Men” (the tyrannical and often insane ruling despots) and the corrupt bureaucracies which surround them

“The question is how long African citizens will support their strongmen and long-serving leaders,” they ask, citing the so-called Arab Spring of 2011 as saw regime change in North African countries that may have caused a “ripple effect” on the southern half of the continent.  But, for too many people, the Spring disintegrated into religious fanaticism and warfare and the UN’s survey of religiousity found that the Africans states were more religious than even some moderate Islamic regimes (Turkey c. 2016 – perhaps no longer applicable) and approached the levels exhibited by fanatical states such as Pakistan.

Demographers, some associated with the UN, have predicted… as far back as the 1980s… that Africa’s overall population will rise sharply, its big cities will grow alarmingly, and although its labour force will also expand, its ‘youth bulge’ will be ‘hard to manage’.  The question arises – will the “youth bulge” rise up and take over the reins of power (nonviolently or otherwise) or will they  choose to emigrate to the West, or will they fall back into despair and fanatical religious and cultural beliefs,

Ever optimistic, perhaps even Panglossian, the authors ask: “What if Africa looks to its youth to realise the continent’s dreams of prosperity? What if the African youth’s confidence in their future and their entrepreneurial spirit were to be matched by substantial investment in their development? Then, no doubt, African countries would join the ranks of the world’s prosperous and happy nations.”  But where will this “investment” come from – and what measures, if any, will prevent it from falling into the rathole of corruption so many African states are.  Taxpayers in Britain, Norway, Germany, Japan and other happier, wealthier places (not to mention the United States) are experiencing their own difficulties and… especially with the intent of the present American administration to increase, rather than close, the inequality gap, the prospect of taking away money to give to poor, dark people has and will continue to generate a backlash that may result in more extreme regimes of the left or the right.

In conclusion, states the WHR, while: “The predominant political discourse in the United States is aimed at raising economic growth, with the goal of restoring the American Dream and the happiness that is supposed to accompany it. But the data show conclusively that this is the wrong approach. The United States can and should raise happiness by addressing America’s multi-faceted social crisis—rising inequality, corruption, isolation, and distrust—rather than focusing exclusively or even mainly on economic growth, especially since the concrete proposals along these lines would exacerbate rather than ameliorate the deepening social crisis.”

That may go over well on the Upper East Side of Manhattan where the American and foreign elite meet and mingle.  But will it play in Pittsburgh?

The UN reports do have a bearing on the Don Jones Index, in that we have weighted our standards to favor local economic trends and issues over global developments (which often do not attract the same attention except in cases of disasters or terrorism).  But WHR also acknowledges that there are far more differences within the United States than between us and other Western nations… differences in race, wealth, culture, religion and geography.  The WBI takes American happiness to a more localized level.

The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index uses “a holistic definition of well-being and self-reported data from individuals across the globe to create a uniquely comprehensive view of societal progress on the elements that matter most to well-being: purpose, social, financial, community and physical.”  (In short, identifying those things your mother, priests and police told you… eat your vegetables, exercise, don’t smoke, drink, have sex or think bad thoughts.  Previous Gallup and Healthways research shows that “high well-being closely relates to key health outcomes such as lower rates of healthcare utilization, lower workplace absenteeism and better workplace performance, change in obesity status and new onset disease burden.”

 

After an exposition and dissection of Gallup’s findings… the unhappiest people in America lived in Fort Smith, Arkansas, the happiest (pre-Irma) in Naples, Florida (one might only wonder whether an angry God chose to chastise those proud, fortunate ones… as well as the gay debauchees of Key West… with a mighty wind and plagues of snakes and gators)…we concluded with a perhaps prescient observation on the United States pullout from the Paris Climate Accords…

 

While talking heads and Democratic politicians wept and rent their garments after America’s pullout, Vladimir Putin refused to condemn Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement, saying there is still hope of developing a "common approach" to the challenge of climate change.  Russia, by the way, finished 49th, just behind Italy but ahead of the overworked Japanese,

Speaking at the annual St Petersburg International Economic Forum on Friday, June 2, Mr Putin said the world should not "judge" the US president but work out how to strike a new deal.

"Don't worry be happy," Mr. Putin counseled during a panel session at the forum.

Don Jones was happy.  There may have been terror in London and Paris, lethal fires in Portugal and war cries in Syria and North Korea, but unemployment kept falling, gas prices kept falling and… miracle of miracles… even consumer debt started falling.

 

Falling unemployment, gas prices and debt!  How different the world seems only three months later!  But are we, as a species, happier?  And if, or if now, who among us has cause for rejoicing and who is left behind with rendings of garments and gnashing of teeth.

See the WHR findings as Attachment One…

 

 

 

 

Strong winds remained on America’s mind through the week as Irma pummeled Naples and the rest Florida (particularly the Keys) and Maria soaked the Caribbean.  Aside from resident Don Joneses, the rest of America will feel the effects in busted budgets (already looking to a December showdown on the next debt ceiling), ruined tourist seasons, higher prices for orange juice (Irma) and meat as Harvey leaves thousands of dead cattle rotting in Texas to add pungency to rising gas prices and outages.  Perhaps unsurprisingly, the number of Americans out of work took a sharp turn upwards (the construction industry will perk up, eventually) and regulators are warning that lots of flooded cars will be sold to the suckers.  But, for all that, fall has fallen and it would seem that there are no more hurricanes in the pipeline.  Yet…

 

 

THE DON JONES INDEX

CHART of CATEGORIES w/VALUE ADDED to EQUAL BASELINE of 15,000

(REFLECTING… approximately… DOW JONES INDEX of June 27, 2013)

See a further explanation of categories here

 

ECONOMIC INDICES (60%)

                                                                                                                                             

DON JONES’ PERSONAL ECONOMIC INDEX (45% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

INCOME

 

(24%)

BASE

6/27/13

      RECKONINGS

       LAST             CHANGE

 

NEXT

DON

9/11/17

DON

9/18/17

 

OUR SOURCE(S) and COMMENTS

 

 

 

Wages (hourly, per capita)    

9%

1350 points 

9/25/17

+0.09%

9/18/17

     1,458.26

 

     1,458.26

 

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/wages   22.12 nd

Median Income (yearly)

4%

600

9/25/17

+0.04%

10/2/17

646.33

646.88

debtclock.org/    30,445

Unempl. (BLS – in millions

4%

600

9/25/17

+2.36%

9/18/17

     1,034.48

     1,034.48

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000     4.4 nd

   Official (DC - in millions)

2%

300

9/25/17

+1.74%

10/2/17

514.74

505.78

http://www.usdebtclock.org/      7,007

   Unofficl. (DC - in millions)

2%

300

9/25/17

-0.97%

10/2/17

488.97

493.69

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    13,565

Workforce Participation

     Number (in millions)

     Percentage (DC)

2%

300

9/25/17

 

+0.005%

+0.047%

10/2/17

288.98

287.62

Americans in/not in workforce (mil.) 

In: 153,675 Out 94,860 Total 248,535

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    61.83%

WP Percentage (ycharts)*

1%

150

9/11/17

+0.16%

9/11/17

150.31

150.31

http://ycharts.com/indicators/labor_force_participation_rate   62.90% nc

 

 

OUTGO

    (15%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Inflation (aggregate)

7%

1050

9/18/17

+0.4

10/2/17

990.02

990.02

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.4 nd

 

Inflation – Food

2%

300

9/18/17

+0.1

10/2/17

280.10

280.10

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.1

 

               - Gasoline

2%

300

9/18/17

+6.3

10/2/17

368.52

368.52

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +6.3

 

               - Medical Costs

2%

300

9/18/17

+0.2%

10/2/17

268.63

268.63

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.2

 

               -  Shelter

2%

300

9/18/17

+0.5%

10/2/17

287.39

287.39

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.5

 

 

WEALTH

(6%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dow Jones Index

2%

300

9/25/17

 +0.37% 

10/2/17

387.35

388.77

Dow – 22,268.34 349.59

Homes – Sales

             -  Valuation

1%

1%

150

150

9/11/17     9/18/17

Sales   -1.45%  Valu.   -0.04%

10/2/17

195.82         230.88

195.82         230.88

http://www.realtor.org/research-and-statistics

Sales (M):  5.44 5.35 Valuations (K):  258.3 253.5

Debt (Personal)

2%

300

9/25/17

   -0.52%

10/2/17

262.80

264.17

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    56,690 395

 

 

AMERICAN ECONOMIC INDEX (15% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

 

NATIONAL

(10%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues (in trillions – tr.)

2%

300

9/25/17

+0.03%

10/2/17

377.58

377.69

debtclock.org/       3.314

 

Expenditures (in tr.)

2%

300

9/25/17

 -0.07%

10/2/17

264.20

264.00

debtclock.org/       4.004

 

National Debt (tr.)

3%

450

9/25/17

 -0.03%

10/2/17

362.23

362.12

http://www.usdebtclock.org/     20.173

 

Aggregate Debt (tr.)

3%

450

9/25/17

+0.04%

10/2/17

378.55

378.42

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    67.832

 

 

 

 

GLOBAL

(5%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Debt (tr.)

2%

300

9/25/17

+0.03%

10/2/17

317.78

317.88

http://www.usdebtclock.org/   6.137

 

Exports (in billions – bl.)

1%

150

9/11/17

-0.26% 

10/2/17

156.15

156.15

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html 194.4

 

Imports (bl.)

1%

150

9/11/17

-0.17%

10/2/17

137.20

137.20

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html 238.1

 

Trade Deficit (bl.)

1%

150

9/11/17

+0.23% 

10/2/17

114.67

114.67

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html  43.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                 SOCIAL INDICES (40%)

                       LIBERTY and SECURITY INDEX           (15%) 

ACTS of MAN

(9%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Peace

3%

450

9/25/17

+0.1%

10/2/17

427.44

427.87

US military wargames put teeth in teetotaler Trump’s mouth… he vows to toally destroy North Korea and lifts a wineglass to toast, pretending to drink

 

Terrorism

2%

300

9/25/17

+0.2%

10/2/17

236.10

235.63

Frenchwoman pours acid on four Americans.  Half a dozen jihadis busted in British bombing plots.

 

Private/Public Corruption 

2%

300

9/25/17

+0.2%

10/2/17

305.91

305.30

Equifax execs’ exodus as company directs complainants to fake website to get their identity stolen (again).  Mueller, targeting Manafort, scoops up fishy White House documents.  Trump cabinet private jet covfere up to three… Price (HHS) and Pruitt (Int.) join Treasury’s Mnooch in disgrace.

 

Crime

1%

150

9/25/17

+0.2%

10/2/17

241.07

240.59

Suspect in Baton Rouge racist killings arrested.  Cops kill a transgender and a deaf man in Oklahoma, Georgia Tech shooting sparks riot-of-the-week.  Baltimore bike share program ended by too many thefts.  Hero teacher clobbers high school shooter in Illinois; angry dad chases off daughters coulrephiliac stalker in a clown mask.

 

 

ACTS of GOD              

(6%)

(with, in some cases, a little… or lots of… help from men, and a few women)

 

 

 

Environment/Weather

3%

450

9/25/17

    -1.2%

10/2/17

352.46

348.23

Maria rocks and roars through Caribbean and levels Puerto Rico.  Zinke shrinks national monuments at Interior… replacing Mount Rushmore with Three Stooges?  Water is contaminated with sulfuric acid in Baltimore, lead in Flint.

 

Natural/Unnatural Disasters

3%

450

9/25/17

    +1.8%

10/2/17

378.63

371.81

Add to hurricane damage a killer earthquake in Mexico City.  Maria flooding imperils dam in Puerto Rico.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                         LIFESTYLE and JUSTICE INDEX          (15%)

Science, Tech. & Education

4%

600

9/25/17

+0.4%

10/2/17

616.34

618.19

Busy scientists develop an electric that gets 1100 miles on a single charge and a laser for shooting down pesky drones.  (We still prefer the organic Eurosolution… hawks.)

 

Equality (economic/social)

4%

600

9/25/17

-0.1%

10/2/17

731.07

732.53

Marines install first female infantry officer.

 

Health

4%

600

9/25/17

+0.2%

10/2/17

545.52

544.97

Obamacare Repeal and Replace revived (for seems like the 100th time).  Devolution to the states ensures race to the bottom, deeper cuts, more thrown off… Republicans brimming with confidence?  Aaron Hernandez autopsy indicates concussion brain damage, Bill Gates warns gains in disease fighting at risk.  Poisonous papayas and deadly Death Wish (duh!) hypercoffee off the shelves.

 

Freedom and Justice                        

3%

450

9/25/17

+0.5%

10/2/17

498.98

499.98

Off to jail goes pervy Tony (Carlos Danger) Weiner for sexting children… he cries as 21 month sentence imposed (and will be crying a lot more once enklinked)!

 

                     

                       MISCELLANEOUS and TRANSIENT INDEX        (10%)

All miscellaneous incidents

 (transient and cultural)

10%

1000

9/25/17

-0.2%

10/2/17

1055.71

1053.60

Sean Spicer a hit at the Emmys.  Private equity deal goes sour as Toys R’Us declares bankruptcy just as Christmas rush begins.  BYU legalizes Coke (the soda), NASCAR’s Richard Petty and Trump call out NFL for flag-disrespecting; toddler hit by foul ball at Yankee Stadium.  RIP boxing’s Raging Bull, Jake LaMotta (95).

 

 

The Don Jones Index for the week of September 18th through September 24th, 2017 was DOWN 14.78 points. 

The Don Jones Index is sponsored by the Coalition for a New Consensus: retired Congressman and Independent Presidential candidate Jack “Catfish” Parnell, Chairman; Brian Doohan, Administrator/Editor.  The CNC denies, emphatically, allegations that the organization, as well as any of its officers (including former Congressman Parnell, environmentalist/America-Firster Austin Tillerman and cosmetics CEO Rayna Finch) and references to Parnell’s works, “Entropy and Renaissance” and “The Coming Kill-Off” are fictitious or mere pawns in the web-serial “Black Helicopters” – and promise swift, effective legal action against parties promulgating this and/or other such slanders.

Comments, complaints, donations (especially SUPERPAC donations) always welcome at feedme@generisis.com or: speak@donjonesindex.com

 

Attachment One – World Happiness Index rankings

 


 

1.      Norway (7.537)

2.      Denmark (7.522)

3.      Iceland (7.504)

4.      Switzerland (7.494)

5.      Finland (7.469)

6.      Netherlands (7.377)

7.      Canada (7.316)

8.      New Zealand (7.314)

9.      Australia (7.284)

10.    Sweden (7.284)

11.    Israel (7.213)

12.    Costa Rica (7.079)

13.    Austria (7.006)

14.    United States (6.993)

15.    Ireland (6.977)

16.    Germany (6.951)

17.    Belgium (6.891)

18.    Luxembourg (6.863)

19.    United King. (6.714)

20.    Chile (6.652)

21.    Un. Arab Emirates (6.648)

22.    Brazil (6.635)

23.    Czech Republic (6.609)

24.    Argentina (6.599)

25.    Mexico (6.578)

26.    Singapore (6.572)

27.    Malta (6.527)

28.    Uruguay (6.454)

29.    Guatemala (6.454)

30.    Panama (6.452)

31.    France (6.442)

32.    Thailand (6.424)

33.    Taiwan (6.422)

34.    Spain (6.403)

35.    Qatar (6.375)

36.    Colombia (6.357)

37.    Saudi Arabia (6.344)

38.    Trin./Tobago (6.168)

39.    Kuwait (6.105)

40.    Slovakia (6.098)

41.    Bahrain (6.087)

42.    Malaysia (6.084)

43.    Nicaragua (6.071)

44.    Ecuador (6.008)

45.    El Salvador (6.003)

46.    Poland (5.973)

47.    Uzbekistan (5.971)

48.    Italy (5.964)

49.    Russia (5.963)

50.    Belize (5.956)

51.    Japan (5.920)

52.    Lithuania (5.902)

53.    Algeria (5.872)

 

54. Latvia (5.850)

55. South Korea (5.838)

56. Moldova (5.838)

57. Romania (5.825)

58. Bolivia (5.823)

59. Turkmenistan (5.822)

60. Kazakhstan (5.819)

61. North Cyprus (5.810)

62. Slovenia (5.758)

63. Peru (5.715)

64. Mauritius (5.629)

65. Cyprus (5.621)

66. Estonia (5.611)

67. Belarus (5.569)

68. Libya (5.525)

69. Turkey (5.500)

70. Paraguay (5.493)

71. Hong Kong  (5.472)

72. Philippines (5.430)

73. Serbia (5.395)

74. Jordan (5.336)

75. Hungary (5.324)

76. Jamaica (5.311)

77. Croatia (5.293)

78. Kosovo (5.279)

79. China (5.273)

80. Pakistan (5.269)

81. Indonesia (5.262)

82. Venezuela (5.250)

83. Montenegro (5.237)

84. Morocco (5.235)

85. Azerbaijan (5.234)

86. Dominican Republic (5.230)

87. Greece (5.227)

88. Lebanon (5.225)

89. Portugal (5.195)

90. Bosnia and Herz. (5.182)

91. Honduras (5.181)

92. Macedonia (5.175)

93. Somalia (5.151)

94. Vietnam (5.074)

95. Nigeria (5.074)

96. Tajikistan (5.041)

97. Bhutan (5.011)

98. Kyrgyzstan (5.004)

99. Nepal (4.962)

100. Mongolia (4.955)

101. South Africa (4.829)

102. Tunisia (4.805)

103. Palestinian Terr. (4.775)

104. Egypt (4.735)

105. Bulgaria (4.714)

106. Sierra Leone (4.709)

107. Cameroon (4.695)

108. Iran (4.692)

109.Albania (4.644)

110. Bangladesh (4.608)

111. Namibia (4.574)

112. Kenya (4.553)

113. Mozambique (4.550)

114. Myanmar (4.545)

115. Senegal (4.535)

116. Zambia (4.514)

117. Iraq (4.497)

118. Gabon (4.465)

119. Ethiopia (4.460)

120. Sri Lanka (4.440)

121. Armenia (4.376)

122. India (4.315)

123. Mauritania (4.292)

124. Congo (Brazzaville) (4.291)

125. Georgia (4.286)

126. Congo (Kinshasa) (4.280)

127. Mali (4.190)

128. Ivory Coast (4.180)

129. Cambodia (4.168)

130. Sudan (4.139)

131. Ghana (4.120)

132. Ukraine (4.096)

133. Uganda (4.081)

134. Burkina Faso (4.032)

135. Niger (4.028)

136. Malawi (3.970)

137. Chad (3.936)

138. Zimbabwe (3.875)

139. Lesotho (3.808)

140. Angola (3.795)

141. Afghanistan (3.794)

142. Botswana (3.766)

143. Benin (3.657)

144. Madagascar (3.644)

145. Haiti (3.603)

146. Yemen (3.593)

147. South Sudan (3.591)

148. Liberia (3.533)

149. Guinea (3.507)

150. Togo (3.495)

151. Rwanda (3.471)

152. Syria (3.462)

153. Tanzania (3.349)

154. Burundi (2.905)

155. Central African Republic (2.693)