THE DON JONES INDEX…

 

GAINS POSTED in GREEN

LOSSES POSTED in RED

 

         10/2/17…  15,608.79

9/25/17…  15,605.44

6/27/13…  15,000.00

 

 

 (THE DOW JONES INDEX: 10/2/17… 22,364.70; 9/25/17… 22,349.59; 6/27/13… 15,000.00)

 

 

LESSON for October 2, 2017 – (HOT) PURSUIT of HAPPINESS!

 

At last!

Here is the sixth and final installment of global compliance/correspondence with the three maxims of Ben Franklin’s “Poor Richard” (Health, Wealth and Wisdom) and the three charges to a decent society made by Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence… (Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness… revised from early drafts that cited Property).

It’s been a long and winding road, with many obstacles… our crashing through the debt ceiling of twenty trillion dollars last week, President Trump’s rejection of the Paris Climate Accords, hurricanes, terrorism and Dr. Seuss banned for racism.

We have already made note of the World Happiness Index analyzed three months ago.  The compilers, associated with the United Nations, performed their juju on over a hundred nations… what portions of the methodology were comprehensible are reprinted in that Lesson… and determined that small, cold European nations (in particular, the Scandanavians and Switzerland) were best.  Africans were worst off, and the United States was 14th, a respectable score (albeit occurring before the last elections, the hurricanes, threats of war and so on).  So much for the reputation of the gloomy Swedes and Norwegians.

We’ve included the WHR stats in our Index and, in fact, gave them double significance, owing to their institutional provenance.  To this, we added several other categories which, as a whole, might indicate the possession of, or lack of, conditions as would facilitate the pursuit of happiness.  They are wholly subjective – there are numerous categories that might appeal to certain sorts of people… indices for hunters, for music lovers, for dog or cat owners… but the ones we chose tend to have an appeal to everyone, or nearly everyone and, where a partisan divide occurs (one, in particular) we attempted to balance the scales.

After the WHR, we considered things that people like to do, be they in Belgium, Brazil or Benin.  Obviously, some stoics excepted, we like to consume… be it food or drink, fast cars (and the gasoline needed to fuel them), sex toys, garden gnomes, the list goes on and on.  We buy things… and the fortunate work to earn money to buy things, often making other things for other people to buy.  The results tended to align with national GDPs and income levels, but although there are instances of unhappy millionaires, few would wish to trade place with Ugandans or Liberians.  The United States, predictably, scored higher here than in almost every other category, finishing second, overall, behind the rich oil sheikhs of the United Arab Emirates.  Consumption data is easily found on Wikipedia, which drew its findings from the World Bank.

For most, corruption (we are speaking of its absence) and transparency in the private and public sectors improves the outlook of most citizens… except, of course, for kleptocratic dictators, grafting politicians, Wall Street lawyers and K Street lobbyists.  Crime, whatever the color of the collar, does not make for happy campers, but its more brutal aspects have been treated in our “Life” lesson… less obvious is the sort of malaise that does not require a gun to the head, rather, a hopeless outlook that winners and losers are predestined by birth and the lives of most people are juggled irresponsibly and implacably by forces beyond their control and managed by plutocrats to and for whom everything is for sale.  Here again, we see the primacy of the cold places in the West, but there are anomalies… Denmark leads (or, rather, trails) the world in corruption, tied with New Zealand, but receives only a middling score in transparency – perhaps due to a complacency that, if things are going well, why look under the bed?  The most open society in the world can be found in Singapore (despite the canings if you smoke pot or chew gum) and the worst, in both cases, included the usual suspects in Africa and the MidEast as well those always-amusing North Koreans.  Americans did rather well in fighting corruption (18th) but the proliferation of fake news and security issues perhaps contribute to a lesser ranking in transparency… 54th (worse than Turkey, China or Zambia!).  Decide for yourself at https://www.transparency.org/news/feature/corruption_perceptions_index_2016.

One might question the source of these indices… particularly transparency, compiled by the World Economic Forum.  Some of the large, global institutions and NGOs subscribe to the sort of victim theology that, to put it plainly, hates the West and, particularly, America.  We, in turn, may regard the detractors as envious (if they derive from Third World places, to use an old-school term) or smug and/or self-hating (if they be rich and white).  As always perspective is at issue.

And this is never more apparent than in our next category – religiousity.  Here, one may take the findings of the global Gallup Poll in 2009 which asked "Is religion important in your daily life?". Percentages for "yes" and "no" answers are listed below; they often do not add up to 100% because some answered "don't know" or did not answer.  (In terms of demographics, India ranks as the country with the largest number of highly religious people in the world, with over 1.05 billion believers (estimated). China, although its number is less than a fifth of its total population (~18-19%), ranks second, with an estimated 240-260 million believers, followed by Indonesia (~235 million), and the United States (~205 million).  The data may be taken in either a positive or negative sense… considering, especially, the prevalence of conservative Islamic regimes (some of which support terrorism) atop the greasy pole.  We have accounted religiosity as, overall, a positive component of happiness due to the comforts of faith (especially among places where other conditions are bleak) and for the sense of solidarity and community-building that faith provides, even if the community is one that draws much of its strength from being against other communities. 

For balance, we included the report of Save the Children on the status of girls and women, which does not play well with some ultra-religious states and, in fact, tends to reflect the treatment of other racial, sexual and cultural minorities within a country and in its treatment of its neighbors.

Citing child marriage, adolescent fertility, maternal mortality (as an indicator of girls’ access to good-quality healthcare – infant mortality was covered in our “Health” index), Women MPs (relative to male MPs – presumably members of parliament or, in the US, Congress) and lower-secondary school completion, SCT concluded: It’s “increasingly worse to be a girl.”  But the data may corrupt the entire Index due to the absence of the most stringent Islamic states from their survey… the overall high rankings of Arab and Muslim nations owes much to the lack of a STC score.

On the issues of both justice and solidarity, we have included trade union membership as a positive aspect in Don Jones’ pursuit of happiness.  Yes – we are aware of the hostility expressed by conservatives, employers and corporate interests, as well as the more notorious instances of corruption or increasingly, in the United States, especially, impotence in the face of the challenges from contract, outsourced or plain slave labor, as well as automation.  But the fact remains that unionized jobs tend to offer better pay and benefits to their members, which facilitates consumption, which leads to happiness.

And, following the semi-bipartisan public perceptions, we have also placed taxation on the negative side of the ledger – meaning a break for the low-tax nations (many with populations who earn nothing worth taxing).  The contention that lower taxes will lead to more jobs at better pay is political gospel to the free-marketeers… whether or not it is actually so… but even poor and working classes grumble as they fumble for pennies to pay the sales tax on a Snickers bar, or look at the deduction stubs of their paychecks and salivate at what they could do with that money.  Yes – most rational people know that taxes fund schools, police, highways and… especially with hi-rise snipers, death-loving Johnny Jihads and crazy Rocket Man at loose in the world… the military, but there remains a twinge whenever April 15th (or whatever deadline due date) arrives, worldwide.

Perhaps the most curious and unexpected category was brought to the Index courtesy of the biannual travel and tourism competitiveness report released by the World Economic Forum, which revealed the countries whose people are the most welcoming -- and the least.  Like many indices, it’s somewhat dated (2013 – those friendly Yeminis in their caves) and we would hope that it would be re-assessed soon.  Meanwhile, pass on that excursion to Bolivia.

Finally, the concept of “pursuit” of happiness (as opposed to the happiness itself as expressed in the WHR Index) is undeniably bound up in the nature of people’s hopes and aspirations.  If the future that Don (or Juan or Kim or Ivan) Jones contemplates is bleak and hopeless, happiness is apt to be in short supply.  But if there is the prospect of a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, Don will find the strength to endure and persevere.

There are two components of hope… the measurable and the ethereal.  The best measure of optimistic (even if ill-favored) societies, is a sense that things are getting better – which is defined by the World Bank as the growth in a country’s GDP.  A rising tide does not always lift all boats or trickle down to all classes (we have already treated the inequality issue in Mr. Franklin’s wealthiness index) but it does give the masses reason to hope that their children’s lives will be better, even if the benefits appear slim at the present.  The WB took surveys in 1961 and 2016 with one anomalous howler of a report… since 2016 data was not available, they settled on Syria as the best place in the world to do business, at least as of 1961.  (Of course, someday… maybe ten years from now, maybe fifty… there should be a lot of construction jobs there.)  On the other hand, stagnant and declining societies engender worry.  And if some of the winners in this category tend to be poor nations clawing their way into the lower-middle strata (think China and India as two of the most visible), well, the people have cause for optimism.

Sometimes, however, optimism is irrational… a total fabrication of faith, culture and human nature as causes some to look forward to a better future as opposed to wallowing in the bitterness of past slights and difficulties.  The final “future” category was measured by Suzy Moat and Tobias Preis of Preis, Moat, Stanley and Bishop (2012), and it is a shame that this obviously small enterprise included only 45 of the countries of the world… primarily, as always, the wealthy ones… because to track the views and prospects of poor nations in places like Africa, the Caribbean (pre-hurricane) or the MidEast conflict states might give some insight into the factors that enable either a bootstrap-rise into solvency such has been occurring in South and East Asia or a collapse into one or another of the failed states, hounded by poverty famine and war.

Then again, that’s a better reckoning than a lot of the OECD data!

 

So what is the “happiest” country in the world?  The U.N. offers up the predictable blue ribboneer… those smug, rational Norwegians.  Our findings were a little bit more daring… and the lack of a female rights score for our winner proved critical.  Can you guess where life is great (if you’re a man)?  See Attachment One, below.

 

As we were preparing this Lesson, news broke of a vile sniper attack upon persons attending a Jason Aldean concert in Las Vegas.  As many as fifty were killed and another five hundred wounded by a person whose name we will not mention, shooting from a sniper nest in the Mandalay Bay hotel above the concert site.  What is both puzzling and troubling is that the shooter had no apparent connection to ISIS or any other domestic or foreign terrorist group, he was neither fa nor antifa, had no criminal record (enabling him to amass a deadly arsenal of automatic weapons) and was, by all accounts, an average or above-average American.  A wealthy former accountant who lived in a ritzy retirement community nearby with his girlfriend, piloted a private plane and liked to visit the casinos to drink tequila shots and gamble… this is not the sort of terrorist we have come to expect, and it means that anybody could go crazy, anytime.

Despite the shootings, Don Jones had a better-than-average week as the weather finally cleared and the cleanup began – the Dow was up, gas prices and unemployment down

 

 

 

 

THE DON JONES INDEX

CHART of CATEGORIES w/VALUE ADDED to EQUAL BASELINE of 15,000

(REFLECTING… approximately… DOW JONES INDEX of June 27, 2013)

See a further explanation of categories here

 

ECONOMIC INDICES (60%)

                                                                                                                                             

DON JONES’ PERSONAL ECONOMIC INDEX (45% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

INCOME

 

(24%)

BASE

6/27/13

      RECKONINGS

       LAST             CHANGE

 

NEXT

DON

9/25/17

DON

10/2/17

 

OUR SOURCE(S) and COMMENTS

 

 

 

Wages (hourly, per capita)    

9%

1350 points 

      10/2/17

+0.09%

9/18/17

     1,458.26

 

     1,458.26

 

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/wages   22.12 nd

Median Income (yearly)

4%

600

10/2/17

+0.04%

10/9/17

646.88

647.11

debtclock.org/    30,456

Unempl. (BLS – in millions

4%

600

10/2/17

+2.36%

9/18/17

     1,034.48

     1,034.48

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000     4.4 nd

   Official (DC - in millions)

2%

300

10/2/17

-0.23%

10/9/17

505.78

506.94

http://www.usdebtclock.org/      6.991

   Unofficl. (DC - in millions)

2%

300

10/2/17

-0.24%

10/9/17

493.69

494.86

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    13,533

Workforce Participation

     Number (in millions)

     Percentage (DC)

2%

300

10/2/17

 

+0.02%

+0.006%

10/9/17

287.62

287.60

Americans in/not in workforce (mil.) 

In: 153,706 Out 94,904 Total 248,610

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    61.825%

WP Percentage (ycharts)*

1%

150

9/11/17

+0.16%

9/11/17

150.31

150.31

http://ycharts.com/indicators/labor_force_participation_rate   62.90% nc

 

 

OUTGO

    (15%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Inflation (aggregate)

7%

1050

9/18/17

+0.4

10/9/17

990.02

990.02

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.4 nd

 

Inflation – Food

2%

300

9/18/17

+0.1

10/9/17

280.10

280.10

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.1

 

               - Gasoline

2%

300

9/18/17

+6.3

10/9/17

368.52

368.52

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +6.3

 

               - Medical Costs

2%

300

9/18/17

+0.2%

10/9/17

268.63

268.63

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.2

 

               -  Shelter

2%

300

9/18/17

+0.5%

10/9/17

287.39

287.39

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.5

 

 

WEALTH

(6%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dow Jones Index

2%

300

10/2/17

 +0.24% 

10/9/17

388.77

389.03

Dow – 22,364.70

Homes – Sales

             -  Valuation

1%

1%

150

150

9/11/17     9/18/17

Sales   -1.45%  Valu.   -0.04%

10/9/17

195.82         230.88

195.82         230.88

http://www.realtor.org/research-and-statistics

Sales (M):  5.35 Valuations (K):  253.5

Debt (Personal)

2%

300

10/2/17

   -0.52%

10/9/17

264.17

265.55

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    56,395

 

 

AMERICAN ECONOMIC INDEX (15% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

 

NATIONAL

(10%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues (in trillions – tr.)

2%

300

10/2/17

+0.02%

10/9/17

377.69

377.76

debtclock.org/       3.314.6

 

Expenditures (in tr.)

2%

300

10/2/17

 -0.07%

10/9/17

264.00

263.81

debtclock.org/       4.006.9

 

National Debt (tr.)

3%

450

10/2/17

 -0.025%

10/9/17

362.12

362.03

http://www.usdebtclock.org/     20.178

 

Aggregate Debt (tr.)

3%

450

10/2/17

+0.04%

10/9/17

378.42

378.29

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    67.855

 

 

 

 

GLOBAL

(5%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Debt (tr.)

2%

300

10/2/17

+0.03%

10/9/17

317.88

317.98

http://www.usdebtclock.org/   6.135

 

Exports (in billions – bl.)

1%

150

9/11/17

-0.26% 

10/9/17

156.15

156.15

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html 194.4

 

Imports (bl.)

1%

150

9/11/17

-0.17%

10/9/17

137.20

137.20

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html 238.1

 

Trade Deficit (bl.)

1%

150

9/11/17

+0.23% 

10/9/17

114.67

114.67

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html  43.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                 SOCIAL INDICES (40%)

                       LIBERTY and SECURITY INDEX           (15%) 

ACTS of MAN

(9%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Peace

3%

450

10/2/17

+0.2%

10/9/17

427.87

428.73

Twitter cracks down on Russian trolls.  North Korea issues more empty threats and Trump rewards them by adding them to his travel ban along with Iran, Venezuela and… Chad?  Election fever breaks out… Catalans vote to get out of Spain (a Spanxit?) and Spanish police respond by shooting them.  Kurds also vote for a homeland, drawing threats of war from Turkey.  Angela Merkl re-elected in Germany, but the paleo-Nazi “fa” vote is way up.

 

Terrorism

2%

300

10/2/17

+3.5%

10/9/17

235.63

227.38

ISIS draws ridicule for claiming Vegas shooting, responds in Edmonton, Canada (!) by a Johnny Jihadi going on a stabbing and ramming rampage while waving the ISIS flag,  Sudanese immigrant kills policemen as revenge for Dylan Roof, Taliban attack on Gen. Mattis fails at Kabul airport.

 

Private/Public Corruption 

2%

300

10/2/17

+0.2%

10/9/17

305.30

304.38

The net closes tighter and tighter upon Jared Kushner, now accused of hiding bad things on a private E-mail server (Hillary’s job).  Basketball coaches exposed taking bribes to steer kids to sneaker marketers; cabinet flyboys Mnuchin, Price and Pruitt (going, going and gone!) catch heat for commandeering private jets.

 

Crime

1%

150

10/2/17

-0.2%

10/9/17

240.59

241.07

Police arrest female killer clown after 27 years in Florida cold case murder.  Animal sellers accused of selling diseased and bad-tempered puppies to the suckers; rapper Young Dolph shot.

 

 

ACTS of GOD             

(6%)

(with, in some cases, a little… or lots of… help from men, and a few women)

 

 

 

Environment/Weather

3%

450

10/2/17

    +0.2%

10/9/17

348.23

348.93

Midwest heat finally breaks and… no more hurricanes!

 

Natural/Unnatural Disasters

3%

450

10/2/17

    +0.5%

10/9/17

371.81

369.95

Trump tax plan enriches billionaires, soaks Don Jones – did anybody expect different.  While the oligarchs gloat, recovery continues in Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico (which is out of everything except blame from Djonald).  Mexican earthquake kills dozens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                         LIFESTYLE and JUSTICE INDEX          (15%)

Science, Tech. & Education

4%

600

10/2/17

+0.4%

10/9/17

618.19

620.66

Lockheed developing a Mars landing module; space guy Elon Musk developing a rocket than go from New York to Shanghai in 39 minutes.  (Return flight via North Korean nuke?)

 

Equality (economic/social)

4%

600

10/2/17

-0.3%

10/9/17

732.53

733.72

Saudis enter the 20th century, allow women to drive.  Mormons, however, double down on gay marriage ban.  Cambridge (mass.) librarian rejects Melania’s gift of Dr. Seuss books as racist.

 

Health

4%

600

10/2/17

+0.1%

10/9/17

544.97

545.51

Trumpcare fails again.  Cops haul anti-vaccine mom off to jail as flu season begins and super-malaria surfaces.

 

Freedom and Justice                        

3%

450

10/2/17

nc

10/9/17

499.98

499.98

The Juice is loose!  Not so the second Slenderman killer teen who gets sent to the nuthouse.

 

                      

                       MISCELLANEOUS and TRANSIENT INDEX        (10%)

All miscellaneous incidents

 (transient and cultural)

10%

1000

10/2/17

+0.3%

10/9/17

1053.60

1056.76

Trump blasts NFL owners as cowards for not firing flag and anthem protestors.  The media call his stance “pretty black and white”.  Prince Harry kicks off Invictus Games in Toronto, Twitter doubles the length of its tweets enabling Hamilton actor to send Trump of on a “golf cart to Hell” and vandals vandalized the Donald’s golf courses.  RIP to Hugh Hefner (91) and Monty Hall (96) but Marilyn Manson survives stage collapse… perhaps a warning from God?

 

 

The Don Jones Index for the week of September 25th through October 1st, 2017 was UP 3.35 points. 

The Don Jones Index is sponsored by the Coalition for a New Consensus: retired Congressman and Independent Presidential candidate Jack “Catfish” Parnell, Chairman; Brian Doohan, Administrator/Editor.  The CNC denies, emphatically, allegations that the organization, as well as any of its officers (including former Congressman Parnell, environmentalist/America-Firster Austin Tillerman and cosmetics CEO Rayna Finch) and references to Parnell’s works, “Entropy and Renaissance” and “The Coming Kill-Off” are fictitious or mere pawns in the web-serial “Black Helicopters” – and promise swift, effective legal action against parties promulgating this and/or other such slanders.

Comments, complaints, donations (especially SUPERPAC donations) always welcome at feedme@generisis.com or: speak@donjonesindex.com

 

 

Attachment One – Don Jones Index happiness rankings

 

 

Overall

W.H.I.

Consumption

Corruption

Transparency

Unionization

Taxes

Religiosity

Girls

Friendliness

Hope

 

 

 

(counts 2X)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Status)

 

 

Growth

Future

Rank

Score

Rank

Score

Rank

$ per capita

Rank

Index

Rank

Rate

Rank

Per 1000 workers

rank

rate

Rank

rate

Rank

Rank

Score

Rank

1961

2016

Rank

United Arab Emir.

1

34.6

21.

(6.648)

1

39,878

24

66

21

5.1

 

 

1

1.4

52

91%

 

15

6.6

93

 

1.75

 

Iceland

2

37.4

3.

(7.504)

15

20,493

14

78

24

5.0

5

403

165

40.4

 

 

1

6.8

5

-2.01

6.10

 

Taiwan

3

40.6

33.

(6.422)

 

 

31

61

6

5.6

41

138

45

13.0

119

45%

 

78

6.2

 

 

 

27

Sweden

4

41.75

10.

(7.284)

18

20,089

4

88

8

5.5

2

419

174

45.8

148

17%

1

24

6.5

82

5.18

2.09

21

Norway

5

42.3

1.

(7.537)

7

24,024

6

85

23

5.1

7

335

172

43.6

145

21%

3

59

6.3

137

5.43

0.22

 

Chile

6

43.75

20.

(6.652)

47

12,915

24

66

15

53

87

44

93

21.0

103

70%

48

84

6.1

127

2.93

0.75

23

Switzerland

7

43.9

4.

(7.494)

4

27,147

5

86

5

5.9

50

110

132

29.4

125

41%

9

23

6.5

138

 

0.20

7

Luxembourg

8

45.8

18.

(6.863)

5

26,054

10

81

10

5.5

12

213

153

36.5

127

39%

14

49

6.4

91

2.89

1.79

 

Saudi Arabia

9

46.7

37.

(6.344)

34

15,124

62

46

34

4.8

87

10

5.3

47

93%

 

128

5.5

150

 

-0.52

10

Malaysia

10

47.2

42.

(6.084)

59

10,965

55

49

17

5.2

99

33

61

15.5

22

96%

 

56

6.3

61

4.26

2.69

14

Canada

11

47.6

7.

(7.316)

10

23,024

9

82

11

5.4

48

115

140

32.2

122

42%

19

12

6.6

134

1.12

0.24

16

Australia

12

48.2

9.

(7.284)

12

22,490

13

79

29

4.9

58

96

114

25.8

138

32%

21

27

6.5

103

0.46

1.33

5

Ireland

13

49.1

15.

(6.977)

27

17,212

19

73

28

5.0

42

129

137

30.8

111

54%

29

9

6.6

49

 

3.09

 

Austria

14

49.4

13.

(7.006)

11

22,946

17

75

20

5.1

28

159

169

43.4

109

55%

13

5

6.7

140

4.96

0.16

13

Malta

15

49.5

27.

(6.527)

35

14,820

47

55

55

4.4

13

210

151

35.2

69

86%

43

17

6.6

28

 

3.82

 

Finland

16

49.6

5.

(7.469)

20

19,568

3

89

2

6.1

4

417

171

43.6

141

28%

2

31

6.5

113

6.85

1.10

 

United Kingdom

17

50.25

19.

(6.714)

13

22,250

10

81

13

5.3

47

116

148

34.4

142

27%

15

77

6.2

121

1.80

1.02

1

Netherlands

18

50.9

6.

(7.377)

21

19,072

8

83

14

5.3

46

120

163

39.8

135

33%

4

47

6.4

97

-1.01

1.67

8

Germany

19

51.4

16.

(6.951)

9

23,332

10

81

27

5.0

55

101

166

40.6

126

40%

12

83

6.1

130

 

0.66

4

Qatar

20

52.8

35.

(6.375)

38

14,334

31

61

9

5.5

 

5

2.2

29

95%

53

109

5.8

161

 

-1.28

 

Kuwait

21

53.3

39.

(6.105)

25

17,639

75

41

107

3.8

33

150

2

1.5

53

91%

 

137

5.2

 

 

 

 

New Zealand

22

53.4

8.

(7.314)

24

18,148

1

90

3

6.0

60

90

149

34.5

136

33%

16

2

6.8

90

 

1.80

 

Belgium

23

54.0

17.

(6.891)

19

19,920

15

77

60

4.4

9

262

176

47.9[2]

137

33%

5

19

6.6

131

4.63

0.53

6

Denmark

24

54.0

2.

(7.522)

23

18,664

1

90

44

4.7

6

394

177

50.8[6]

147

19%

6

117

5.7

132

5.64

0.45

 

Singapore

25

55.0

26.

(6.572)

14

21,101

7

84

1

6.2

57

99

53

14.2

104

70%

 

16

6.6

129

4.58

0.68

 

Mauritius

26

55.7

64.

(5.629)

58

11,067

50

54

41

4.7

63

88

81

19.0

 

 

28

6.5

35

 

3.63

 

Bahrain

27

56.0

41.

(6.087)

36

14,814

70

43

12

5.4

171

8

4.8

39

94%

 

20

6.6

 

 

 

 

Poland

28

56.2

46.

(5.973)

44

12,977

29

62

101

3.8

61

89

145

33.8

91

75%

22

118

5.7

56

 

2.78

26

United States

29

56.4

14.

(6.993)

2

35,138

18

74

54

4.4

81

53

115

26.0

106

69%

32

55

6.4

124

0.62

0.91

15

Panama

30

56.6

30.

(6.452)

65

10,281

87

38

33

4.8

103

29

25

10.6

62

88%

86

111

5.8

45

7.68

3.20

 

Spain

31

56.8

34.

(6.403)

29

16,769

41

58

75

4.2

90

39

158

37.3

115

49%

11

57

6.3

43

10.80

3.24

22

Costa Rica

32

57.5

12.

(7.079)

71

9,299

41

58

50

4.5

92

34

94

21.0

87

79%

74

41

6.4

42

-4.46

3.27

 

Japan

33

58.4

51.

(5.920)

17

20,129

20

72

22

5.1

66

83

129

28.3

143

24%

35

74

6.2

112

9.16

1.12

3

Israel

34

58.5

11.

(7.213)

26

17,437

28

64

52

4.4

68

71

155

36.8

113

51%

17

68

6.2

83

7.59

2.01

 

France

35

  60.2

31.

(6.442)

16

20,414

23

69

46

4.6

54

101