THE DON JONES INDEX…

 

GAINS POSTED in GREEN

  LOSSES POSTED in RED

 

          4/9/18…  15,631.88

          4/2/18…  15,621.51 6/27/13…  15,000.00

      

(THE DOW JONES INDEX:  4/2/18… 23,932.76; 4/9/18… 24,103.11; 6/27/13… 15,000.00)

 

LESSON for April 9, 2018 – ARE WE HAVING FUN YET?

 

Well, the answer to that is that one word answer as the old folks give when asked why they are going to the Walgreens…

Depends.

Depends, in the instance of World Happiness, on whether you take the findings of the UN’s World Happiness Report as prepared by the Gallup people and compiled from the dense, macabre WHR charts and graphs in the most understandable form by Wikipedia and attached to last week’s Lesson… Finland supplanting 2017’s Norway; or whether you’d prefer the findings and methodology of some other guys (U.S. News and World Reports, for one…Switzerland… or a somewhat different 2012 poll elevating Panama (!?!).  How about a 2014 survey by the Pew people (Mexico?!?) or even our own Don Jones Index World Happiness Report for 2017 – Sweden?

Most such reports… outliers discounted as being more influenced by politics (if not outright political correctness) than facts… tended to support the view that small, cold, social democracies full of white snowflakes and white people were the happiest in the world.

Jon Clifton is a global managing partner at Gallup and remembers when the Gallup World Poll was first conceived in 2005. He told howstuffworks.com that the survey design team consulted with some top minds — including the Nobel Prize-winners Daniel Kahneman, psychologist, and economist Angus Deaton.

"The World Happiness Report is one of the most, if not the most-watched indexes in the world," says Clifton. "You can ask anyone on the street who is the happiest country in the world and they'll tell you it's Finland or Norway, because they saw a headline in The Economist."

The WHR crowned a new top ranking country, Finland, “but the top ten positions are held by the same countries as in the last two years,” the report concluded, “although with some swapping of places. Four different countries have held top spot in the four most recent reports- Denmark, Switzerland, Norway and now Finland.

“All the top countries tend to have high values for all six of the key variables that have been found to support well-being: income, healthy life expectancy, social support, freedom, trust and generosity. Among the top countries, differences are small enough that that year-to-year changes in the rankings are to be expected.”

The survey takers focused on these the six variables sub-bars (categories) subject to a mysterious seventh, which postulates an imaginary country called Dystopia where everything that can go wrong does and the nearness or distance of WHR’s 156 nations from this imaginary point of no return further tips the scales one way or the another by a process that we (and the UN) will endeavor to explain.

Overall, say the researchers, average life evaluations in the top 10 countries are more than twice as high as in the bottom 10 on a scale that they call the Cantrill Ladder. Possible reasons for these very different life evaluations suggest that, “of the 4.10 point difference, 3.22 points can be traced to differences in the six key factors: 1.06 points from the GDP per capita gap, 0.90 due to differences in social support, 0.61 to differences in healthy life expectancy, 0.37 to differences in freedom, 0.21 to differences in corruption perceptions, and 0.07 to differences in generosity. Income differences are the single largest contributing factor, at one-third of the total, because, of the six factors, income is by far the most unequally distributed among countries. GDP per capita is 30 times higher in the top 10 than in the bottom 10 countries.”

“Taking the example of healthy life expectancy, the sub-bar in the case of Tanzania (153rd of 156) is equal to the number of years by which healthy life expectancy in Tanzania exceeds the world’s lowest value, multiplied by a coefficient for the influence of healthy life expectancy on life evaluations.” (See report, Table 2.1: the width of its different multi-colored… but not translated into English, nor arithmatic… sub-bars then shows, country-by-country, how much each of the six variables is estimated to contribute to explaining the international ladder differences. These calculations are illustrative rather than conclusive, for several reasons.)

 

GDP per

capita

 

Social support

 

Health    (Life Exp.)

 

Freedom 

 

Generosity.

 

Corruption  Residual  (Trust)         Dystopia    

 

0.455

0.991

0.381

0.481

0.270

0.097          Not listed

 

 

 

 

 

 

First, the selection of candidate variables is restricted by what is available for all these countries. Traditional variables like GDP per capita and healthy life expectancy are widely available. But measures of the quality of the social context, which have been shown in experiments and national surveys to have strong links to life evaluations and emotions, say the researchers, “have not been sufficiently surveyed in the Gallup or other global polls, or otherwise measured in statistics available for all countries. Even with this limited choice, we find that four variables covering different aspects of the social and institutional context – having someone to count on, generosity, freedom to make life choices and absence of corruption – are together responsible for more than half of the average difference between each country’s predicted ladder score and that in Dystopia in the 2015-2017 period.

The seventh and final segment is the sum of two components. The first component is a fixed number representing our calculation of the 2015-2017 ladder score for Dystopia (=1.92). The second component is the 2015-2017 residual for each country. The sum of these two components comprises the right-hand sub-bar for each country; it varies from one country to the next because some countries have life evaluations above their predicted values, and others lower.  The residual simply represents that part of the national average Ladder score that is not explained by our model; with the residual included, the sum of all the sub-bars adds up to the actual average life evaluations on which the rankings are based.

Got that?

But for the 2018 survey… which includes data from 2016 and ’17, but drops that from 2015… the pollsters added a new wrinkle of the present times: how each of the polled places responds to immigration.

“Perhaps the most striking finding of the whole report is that a ranking of countries according to the happiness of their immigrant populations is almost exactly the same as for the rest of the population,” stated the compilers. “The immigrant happiness rankings are based on the full span of Gallup data from 2005 to 2017, sufficient to have 117 countries with more than 100 immigrant respondents.”

Could it have been possible that the American elections of 2016… perhaps combined with other nativist movements in France, Hungary, and Italy (to name a few) as well as Brexit… influence the UN’s focus?

“The ten happiest countries in the overall rankings also (garner) ten of the top eleven spots in the ranking of immigrant happiness. Finland is at the top of both rankings in this report, with the happiest immigrants, and the happiest population in general.”

As the old excuse goes, mistakes, perhaps were made in the compilation of gains and/or losses by the select 156… either by the editors of the Report or by the Wikipedia folks who transcribed the results into the only fathomable document (Gallup/WHR opted for a panoply of graphs and charts and equations with thousands of squiggly, multicolored lines, ponderous definitions and largely incoherent conversion mantras – the most egregious of which was their concept of “residual dystopy”, which abracadabrae inexplicably turned shitholes into paradises and paradises into shitholes – as follows...

We calculate, based on the estimates in the first column of Table 2.1, that Dystopia had a 2015- 2017 ladder score equal to 1.92 on the 0 to 10 scale. The final sub-bar is the sum of two components: the calculated average 2015-2017 life evaluation in Dystopia (=1.92) and each country’s own prediction error, which measures the extent to which life evaluations are higher or lower than predicted by our equation in the first column of Table 2.1. These residuals are as likely to be negative as positive.”

 

Consequently, we at DJI have deleted the better/worse column of Wikipedia’s data based on the suspicion that it may have been mistranscribed, which would also corrupt the data on the rest of the categories.  The latter is drawn from another section of the document and, as the researchers allege: “The analysis of happiness changes from 2008-2010 to 2015-2015 (sic – the change from 2017’s 2014-16 data to 2018 can be calculated from Wikipedia sources) shows Togo as the biggest gainer, moving up 17 places in the overall rankings from the last place position it held as recently as in the 2015 rankings. The biggest loser is Venezuela, down 2.2 points on the 0 to 10 scale.”

America, in falling four places to 18th, lost .315 points overall – putting it in 107th place relative to 2015.  It was, said the International Business Times, the second consecutive year the U.S. has been unable to maintain its spot, let alone climb up ranks, in the list that counts down from the happiest to the saddest country in the world.

"Social support networks in the U.S. have weakened over time; perceptions of corruption in government and business have risen over time; and confidence in public institutions has waned," the report said.

Furthermore, the opioid epidemic, and mental and physical health issues like depression and obesity overshadowed the economic growth in the U.S.

At that, 18th place was still much better than our own survey of world happiness (see Attachment Two) which dropped America to 28th place, behind the Japanese, Slovenians and Europe’s basket cases – Portugal and Italy.  Our criteria, drawn from Benjamin Franklin’s recipes for health, wealth and wisdom, and the commitments to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness expressed in the Declaration of Independence, placed more emphasis on factors like rising inequality and the costs of healthcare.  (Given events of the past week… further erosion of climate controls and an impending mass deportation of immigrant “Dreamers”, our ranking would almost certainly have continued to decline.)

Perhaps the most striking finding of the whole report is that a ranking of countries according to the happiness of their immigrant populations is almost exactly the same as for the rest of the population. The immigrant happiness rankings are based on the full span of Gallup data from 2005 to 2017, sufficient to have 117 countries with more than 100 immigrant respondents.  (See Attachment Seven.)

Despite being embroiled in constant violence, income disparities and dissipating confidence on governmental institutions,” noted the IB Times, “Latin America has proven to be happier than its northern counterpart.

“Relationships are important for people's happiness; and that positive relationships are abundant in Latin America,” the report reads.

 “If you equate happiness with high levels of positive daily experiences and emotions, then several surprising countries come out on top, according to Gallup data from 2017,” noted howstuffworks: Colombia, El Salvador and Guatemala.

There were some surprising losers, too… India for example  The Bombay bloggers at RVCJ – said that “Indians are not a happy lot and we are not talking vague! The results of World Happiness Report 2018 that was made by UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) prove that Indians are not happy.Pakistan secured 75th position, Bhutan is at 97th spot, Nepal at 101, Bangladesh at 115 while Sri Lanka stood at 116. One more neighbour of India, China got 86th rank in the World Happiness Report. Pakistan may be far behind India in terms of infrastructure and development and might be very much affected by terrorism but still Pakistanis are happier than Indians which is quite surprising.”

 

The report was not without more critics of both its values and methodology.

Eupedia questioned the methodology of the “Generosity” quotient, in which the population was asked: “Have you donated money to a charity in the past month?”. Failing to gauge how this impacts local happiness, “as charities are often international (e.g. scientific research) or geared toward poorer countries” it also downsmaked occupants of the poorer countries as had more important things to do with their money than sending it off to strange, foreign post office boxes (like buying food).

And they mocked WHR’s "Positive affect" (defined as the average of previous-day affect measures for happiness, laughter, and enjoyment) and "Negative affect" (defined as the average of previous-day affect measures for worry, sadness, and anger) which were apparantly confabulated from responses to a variety of questions. “These two are averaged in the Dystopia category, which is the biggest (un-understandable) component of the Happiness Index” and which produced a modifier applicable to the six root categories of the survey.

Howstuffworks tried for a more nuanced approach to the intangibles of happiness.  “Beyond higher incomes, Nordic countries also rank high on other metrics that the World Happiness Report equates with well-being: freedom, trust of the government, long life expectancy, social support and generosity.

“But what about the second type of happiness question, the one based on emotions and daily life experience? In addition to the ladder question, the Gallup World Poll poses a series of "yesterday" questions, asking people if they experienced specific positive and negative emotions during the previous day: things like smiling and laughter, respect, enjoyment, worry, sadness and anger.”

In other words, you can take a busload of Syrian children to a circus in Damascus or Tel Aviv, return them to their bombed-out hellholes and then ask: “Were you happy yesterday?”  It’s an unfair analogy, but perhaps applicable to some of the wider questions of resolving unhappiness by recognizing its causes.

“The importance of social factors in the happiness of all populations, whether migrant or not, is emphasized in Chapter 6, where the happiness bulge in Latin America is found to depend on the greater warmth of family and other social relationships there, and to the greater importance that people there attach to these relationships,” concluded the researchers.

Nonetheless, some of the stranger findings, the “softness” of the categories… how about quantity of nuclear weapons, as puts America and Russia at the top of the heat, followed by China, France, the U.K., Israel, India, Pakistan and (now making the Top Ten) North Korea?... and the decision to monitor immigration itself have drawn criticism, mostly from nativist and conservative sources.

Just as the World Health Organization (another UN-sponsored klaven of do-gooders) was pilloried by the American Spectator back when Obamacare was on the table for advancing “ideological assumptions that most Americans might find questionable”, the once-left, now right New York Post called 2017’s Report “crap” and “rubbish” (3/22/17) mocked the contention that gloomy Scandinavians are happy with their lame, Socialist utopias and concluded: You might as well run a survey based on asking the dudes of the world, “Who’s best in bed?”

Undeterred by cynics and nativists, the UN doubled down on its contention that immigration is good for both the immigrant and the welcoming (or unwelcoming) destination.

“Helsinki, Copenhagen and Reykjavik are already very international places,” they contend and conclude. “What is for them, and for the world, the right scale and pattern of future migration to help support and build international cooperation of a sort that will help the billions of people still living in misery? These are not the world’s happiest cities because of where they are, but because their residents have over many decades built levels of trust, connections, cooperation and innovation sufficient to deliver satisfying lives for themselves, and to be in a position to help others do the same. What is needed is to look behind the average life evaluations to see what makes for better lives, and to help others to make progress in improving their own lives. International migration, with its increasing two-way flows, is likely to continue to provide international human linkages and shared sympathies sufficient to support knowledge transfers of the sort that are needed. But migration flows not properly managed and digested have the potential for destroying trust and inflaming anti-immigrant views. Similar questions arise when city-level happiness is ranked in countries that have sufficiently great samples of data to make such comparisons feasible. One immediate response among readers and commentators is to suggest that people should move to a happier community in order to make themselves happier. On reflection, when they see the nature of the social connections, and the quality of communities, governments and workplaces that underlie these happier lives, they see that the right answer is not to move to the happier communities but instead to learn and apply the lessons and inspirations that underlie their happiness. Happiness is not something inherently in short supply, like gold, inciting rushes to find and much conflict over ownership. My gold cannot be your gold. But happiness, unlike gold, can be created for all, and can be shared without being scarce for those who give. It even grows as it is shared.”

So – who was happy, and who was not, this week?

After a couple of weeks of tariff and interest-related declines, Don Jones’ Dow Jones portfolio (if he has one), finally began inching back up.  There was plenty of turmoil in Washington as will affect Don’s future prospects, but little on the immediate horizon (save an unlisted, but notable spike in gas prices.)

 

 

THE DON JONES INDEX

CHART of CATEGORIES w/VALUE ADDED to EQUAL BASELINE of 15,000

(REFLECTING… approximately… DOW JONES INDEX of June 27, 2013)

See a further explanation of categories here

 

ECONOMIC INDICES (60%)

                                                                                                                                                 

DON JONES’ PERSONAL ECONOMIC INDEX (45% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

INCOME

 

(24%)

BASE

6/27/13

      RECKONINGS

       LAST            CHANGE

 

NEXT

DON

4/2/18

DON

4/9/18

 

OUR SOURCE(S) and COMMENTS

 

 

 

Wages (hourly, per capita)    

9%

1350 points 

        3/12/18

+0.18%

Apr. 18

     1,472.77

      1,474.10

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/wages   22.42

Median Income (yearly)

4%

600

4/9/18

+0.06%

4/16/18

       674.31

        674.76

debtclock.org/    31,768

Unempl. (BLS – in millions

4%

600

2/12/18

-2.44%

Apr. 18

     1,110.17

      1,110.17

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000     4.1 nc

   Official (DC - in millions)

2%

300

4/9/18

+0.23%

4/16/18

 517.14

522.49

http://www.usdebtclock.org/      6,574

   Unofficl. (DC - in millions)

2%

300

4/9/18

+0.20%

4/16/18

      491.34

        500.47

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    12,920

Workforce Participation

     Number (in millions)

     Percentage (DC)

2%

300

4/9/18

+0.3%

+0.1%

4/16/18

286.59

285.54

Americans in/not in workforce (mil.) 

In: 155,217 Out 95,356 Total 250,573

http://www.usdebtclock.org/  61.94%  

WP Percentage (ycharts)*

1%

150

4/9/18

+0.17%

Apr. 18

150.83

150.59

http://ycharts.com/indicators/labor_force_participation_rate   62.90

 

 

OUTGO

    (15%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Inflation (aggregate)

7%

1050

       3/19/18

+0.5%

4/16/18

973.30

973.30

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.2

 

Inflation – Food

2%

300

3/19/18

+0.2%

4/16/18

278.70

278.70

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     nc

 

               - Gasoline

2%

300

3/19/18

+5.7%

4/16/18

290.19

290.19

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     -0.9

 

               - Medical Costs

2%

300

3/19/18

+0.6%

4/16/18

264.88

264.88

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     nc

 

               -  Shelter

2%

300

3/19/18

+0.2%

4/16/18

283.40

283.40

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm    +0.3

 

 

WEALTH

(6%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dow Jones Index

2%

300

        4/9/18

   -0.71%     

4/16/18

432.70

429.64

Dow – 23,932.76

Homes – Sales

             -  Valuation

1%

1%

150

150

2/26/18

Sales   +2.97%      Valu.   -1.96%

Apr. 18

202.78         214.76

202.78         214.76

http://www.realtor.org/research-and-statistics

Sales (M):  5.54 Valuations (K):  241.7  

Debt (Personal)

2%

300

3/12/18

   +0.09%

4/16/18

258.90

258.66

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    57,865

 

 

 

AMERICAN ECONOMIC INDEX (15% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

 

           NATIONAL

(10%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues (in trillions – tr.)

2%

300

        4/9/18

 -+0.09%

4/16/18

385.37

385.71

debtclock.org/       3.377

 

Expenditures (in tr.)

2%

300

4/9/18

 +0.10%

4/16/18

257.39

257.14

debtclock.org/       4.111

 

National Debt (tr.)

3%

450

4/9/18

 +0.31%

4/16/18

346.90

345.82

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    21,122

 

Aggregate Debt (tr.)

3%

450

4/9/18

+0.10%

4/16/18

367.93

367.58

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    69,876

 

 

 

 

           GLOBAL

(5%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Debt (tr.)

2%

300

       4/9/18

+0.10%

4/16/18

308.95

308.66

http://www.usdebtclock.org/   6.316

 

Exports (in billions – bl.)

1%

150

3/19/18

+1.74%

4/16/18

158.33

161.09

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html  200.9 204.4

 

Imports (bl.)

1%

150

3/19/18

-1,72%

4/16/18

129.37

127.15

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/congressional.html 257.5 262.0

 

232.0262.0Trade Deficit (bl.)

1%

150

3/19/18

-1.74%

4/16/18

88.92

87.38

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/highlights/monthly.html  56.6 57.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                 SOCIAL INDICES (40%)

 

                       LIBERTY and SECURITY INDEX           (15%) 

          ACTS of MAN

(9%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Peace

3%

450

       4/9/18

 -0.3%

4/16/18

424.66

423.39

POTUS doubles down – China imposes 50B tariffs, he raises to 100B,  In a busy week, he sends troops to the Mexican border, denounces Syrian poison gas attack.  Black Ops mercenaries Blackwater CEO Prince says his meeting with Russian banker at Seychilles airport was accidental… South Carolina legislators’ call for secession probably isn’t.

 

Terrorism

2%

300

4/9/18

-0.1%

4/16/18

222.12

222.34

Hero and (Boston) Patriot Julian Edelman foils vile school shooting plot,  Angry videomaker shoots up You Tube, monster rams monster truck into crowd in Munster, Germany, killin 2, injuring 20.

 

Private/Public Corruption 

2%

300

4/9/18

    -0.3%

4/16/18

299.52

300,42

EPA’s Pruitt grilled on sweetheart apartment deal, huge raises for toadies and demanding police escorts with sirens blaring.  (See below)  Mueller’s first scalp – a Dutch lawyer gets 30 days for Russiagate!  Corrupt SoKo ex=President gets 24 years.

 

Crime

1%

150

4/9/18

 -0.3%

4/16/18

238.42

239,14

London murder rate tops New York.  Ritzy department stores hacked, 5 M customers at risk.  DEA busts dopey doctors.

 

 

          ACTS of GOD             

(6%)

(with, in some cases, a little… or lots of… help from men, and a few women)

 

Environment/Weather

3%

450

4/9/18

    -0.5%

4/16/18

334.21

332.54

Trump brushes off Pruitt foibles (above) after he rolls back Obama climate and pollution regulations.  Above average hurricane season predicted.  April blizzards have skeptics chortling: what global warming?

 

Natural/Unnatural Disasters

3%

450

4/9/18

    -0.4%

4/16/18

354.22

355.64

LA boy rescued in miracle sewage tunnel fall, unrelated LA quake causes no damage, no injuries.  Bad bus week for Masters attendees and Canadian hockey team; Norweigian cruise ship takes passengers on a trip to Hell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                         LIFESTYLE and JUSTICE INDEX          (15%)

 

Science, Tech. & Education

4%

600

4/9/18

-0.2%

4/16/18

628.75

627.49

Teachers’ strikes spread from Arizona and West Virginia to Oklahoma.  Hackers hack Delta passengers.  Ex-migration causes Puerto Rico to close 283 schools.

 

 

Equality (economic/social)

4%

600

4/9/18

+0.1%

4/16/18

733.06

733.79

MLK 50th anniversary draws crowds, coverage. Trump celebrates by promising to deport dreamers, inciting fears of Mexican “caravans” coming to America to rape women “at levels never seen before!”  Landmark Augusta women’s tourney begins.  North Miami Beach police call Parkland victims paid actors. 

 

 

Health

4%

600

4/9/18

-0.1%

4/16/18

531.94

531.41

Lawyers descend on faulty fertility clinics that let eggs and embryos unfreeze and rot.  Chicago man killed by fake marijuana.

 

 

Freedom and Justice                        

3%

450

4/9/18

-0.1%

4/16/18

505.52

505.01

Panera accused of selling customer data.  To Russia?  Sex police shut down Backpage.com.  Yet another Cosby trial starts, then stops, as lawyers call majority-white jury racist.

 

                      

                       MISCELLANEOUS and TRANSIENT INDEX        (10%)

All miscellaneous incidents

   (transient and cultural)

10%

1000

        4/9/18

+0.1%

4/16/18

1080.22

 1081.30

Coast to coast local gun control meetings… Speaker Ryan dodges Wisconsin town hall and gets an empty chair.  Saudis open first movie theater in 30 years.  Evil vet student” accused of soliciting horses for retirement farm and selling them to slaughterhouses.  Trump skips correspondents dinner full of hostile fake newsies and pulls a Sgt. Shultz on Stormy (I know nozzing!)  Yet another bus gets beaten up by MMA’s Conor McGregor.  Menendez Brothers reunited in prison.  RIP TV Producer Steve Bochco, RIH Dictator Rios-Montt.  Rest somewhere between – South Africa’s controversial Winnie Mandela.  Patrick Reed (Captain America) wins Masters, but Jack Nicklaus’ 15-year old grandson thrills crowd with hole-in-one.

 

 

The Don Jones Index for the week of April 1st through April 8, 2018 was UP 10.37 points.

 

The Don Jones Index is sponsored by the Coalition for a New Consensus: retired Congressman and Independent Presidential candidate Jack “Catfish” Parnell, Chairman; Brian Doohan, Administrator/Editor.  The CNC denies, emphatically, allegations that the organization, as well as any of its officers (including former Congressman Parnell, environmentalist/America-Firster Austin Tillerman and cosmetics CEO Rayna Finch) and references to Parnell’s works, “Entropy and Renaissance” and “The Coming Kill-Off” are fictitious or, at best, mere pawns in the web-serial “Black Helicopters” – and promise swift, effective legal action against parties promulgating this and/or other such slanders.

Comments, complaints, donations (especially SUPERPAC donations) always welcome at feedme@generisis.com or: speak@donjonesindex.com

BACK

 

 

Appendix One – WHR findings (2018) with DJI correlation

 

The World Happiness Report is a landmark survey of the state of global happiness. The World Happiness Report 2018, which ranks 156 countries by their happiness levels, and 117 countries by the happiness of their immigrants, was released on March 14th at a launch event at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences in the Vatican.  Those nations scoring best in a category are highlighted in blue, those doing worst in red.

          

            Rankings

 World Health Report          DJI

2018                         2017     10/17

 

WHR  

Score

2018

 

GDP    per

capita

 

 

Social support

 

Health (Life Expect.)

 

Freedom 

 

Gener.

 

Corrupt.  Resid. (Trust)     Dystopy

 

1

  Finland

5

6

7.632

1.305

1.592

0.874

0.681

0.192

0.393

Not listed

2

  Norway

1

4t

7.594

1.456

1.582

0.861

0.686

0.286

0.340

 

3

  Denmark

2

12

7.555

1.351

1.590

0.868

0.683

0.284

0.408

 

4

  Iceland

3

3

7.495

1.343

1.644

0.914

0.677

0.353

0.138

 

5

  Switzerland

4

2

7.487

1.420

1.549

0.927

0.660

0.256

0.357

 

6

  Netherlands

6

7

7.441

1.361

1.488

0.878

0.638

0.333

0.295

 

7

  Canada

7

11

7.328

1.330

1.532

0.896

0.653

0.321

0.291

 

8

  New Zealand

8

15

7.324

1.268

1.601

0.876

0.669

0.365

0.389

 

9

  Sweden

10

1

7.314

1.355

1.501

0.913

0.659

0.285

0.383

 

10

  Australia

9

8

7.272

1.340

1.573

0.910

0.647

0.361

0.302

 

11

  Israel

11

27

7.190

1.244

1.433

0.888

0.464

0.262

0.082

 

12

  Austria

13

13

7.139

1.341

1.504

0.891

0.617

0.242

0.224

 

13

  Costa Rica

12

51

7.072

1.010

1.459

0.817

0.632

0.143

0.101

 

14

  Ireland

15

9

6.977

1.448

1.583

0.876

0.614

0.307

0.306

 

15

  Germany

16

4t

6.965

1.340

1.474

0.861

0.586

0.273

0.280

 

16

  Belgium

17

10

6.927

1.324

1.483

0.894

0.583

0.188

0.240

 

17

  Luxembourg

18

16

6.910

1.576

1.520

0.896

0.632

0.196

0.321

 

18

  United States

14

28

6.886

1.398

1.471

0.819

0.547

0.291

0.133

 

19

  United King.

19

17

6.814

1.301

1.559

0.883

0.533

0.354

0.272

 

20

  Un. Arab Em.

21

34

6.774

2.096

  nl

0.776

0.670

0.284

0.186

 

21

  Czech Rep.

23

19

6.711

1.233

1.489

0.854

0.543

0.064

0.034

 

22

  Malta

27

37

6.627

1.270

1.525

0.884

0.645

0.376

0.142

 

23

  France

31

14

6.489

1.293

1.466

0.908

0.520

0.098

0.176

 

24

  Mexico

25

47

6.488

1.038

1.252

0.761

0.479

0.069

0.095

 

25

  Chile

20

36

6.476

1.131

1.331

0.808

0.431

0.197

0.061

 

26

  Taiwan

33

22

6.441

1.365

1.436

0.857

0.418

0.151

0.078

 

27

  Panama

20

66

6.430

1.112

1.438

0.759

0.597

0.125

0.063

 

28

  Brazil

22

91

6.419

0.986

1.474

0.675

0.493

0.110

0.088

 

29

  Argentina

24

68

6.388

1.073

1.468

0.744

0.570

0.062

0.054

 

30

  Guatemala

29

120

6.382

0.781

1.268

0.608

0.604

0.179

0.071

 

31

  Uruguay

28

44

6.379

1.093

1.459

0.771

0.625

0.130

0.155

 

32

  Qatar

35

32

6.374

1.649

1.303

0.748

0.654

0.256

0.171

 

33

  Saudi Arabia

37

71

6.371

1.379

1.331

0.633

0.509

0.098

0.127

 

34

  Singapore

26

29

6.343

1.529

1.451

1.008

0.631

0.261

0.457

 

35

  Malaysia

42

52

6.322

1.161

1.258

0.669

0.356

0.311

0.059

 

36

  Spain

34

20

6.310

1.251

1.538

0.965

0.449

0.142

0.074

 

37

  Colombia

36

84

6.260

0.960

1.439

0.635

0.531

0.099

0.039

 

38

  Trin. & Tob.

38

88

6.192

1.223

1.492

0.564

0.575

0.171

0.019

 

39

  Slovakia

40

25

6.173

1.210

1.537

0.776

0.354

0.118

0.014

 

40

  El Salvador

45

98

6.167

0.806

1.231

0.639

0.461

0.065

0.082

 

41

  Nicaragua

43

112

6.141

0.668

1.319

0.700

0.527

0.208

0.128

 

42

  Poland

46

31

6.123

1.176

1.448

0.781

0.546

0.108

0.064

 

43

  Bahrain

41

64

6.105

1.338

1.366

0.698

0.594

0.243

0.123

 

44

  Uzbekistan

47

87

6.096

0.719

1.584

0.605

0.724

0.328

0.259

 

45

  Kuwait

39

45

6.083

1.474

1.301

0.675

0.554

0.167

0.106

 

46

  Thailand

32

85

6.072

1.016

1.417

0.707

0.637

0.364

0.029

 

47

  Italy

48

23

6.000

1.264

1.501

0.946

0.281

0.137

0.028

 

48

  Ecuador

44

116

5.973

0.889

1.330

0.736

0.556

0.114

0.120

 

49

  Belize

50

128

5.956

0.807

1.101

0.474

0.593

0.183

0.089

 

50

  Lithuania

52

39

5.952

1.197

1.527

0.716

0.350

0.026

0.006

 

51

  Slovenia

62

21

5.948

1.219

1.506

0.856

0.633

0.160

0.051

 

52

  Romania

57

42

5.945

1.116

1.219

0.726

0.528

0.088

0.001

 

53

  Latvia

54

38

5.933

1.148

1.454

0.671

0.363

0.092

0.066

 

54

  Japan

51

18

5.915

1.294

1.462

0.988

0.553

0.079

0.150

 

55

  Mauritius

64

54

5.891

1.090

1.387

0.684

0.584

0.245

0.050

 

56

  Jamaica

76

97

5.890

0.819

1.493

0.693

0.575

0.096

0.031

 

57

  South Korea

56

33

5.875

1.266

1.204

0.955

0.244

0.175

0.051

 

58

  N. Cyprus

61

NL

5.835

1.229

1.211

0.909

0.495

0.179

0.154

 

59

  Russia

49

60t

5.810

1.151

1.479

0.599

0.399

0.065

0.025

 

60

  Kazakhstan

60

72

5.790

1.143

1.516

0.631

0.454

0.148

0.121

 

61

  Cyprus

65

24

5.762

1.229

1.191

0.909

0.423

0.202

0.035

 

62

  Bolivia

58

108

5.752

0.751

1.223

0.508

0.606

0.141

0.054

 

63

  Estonia

66

30

5.739

1.200

1.532

0.737

0.553

0.086

0.174

 

64

  Paraguay

70

105

5.681

0.835

1.522

0.615

0.541

0.162

0.074

 

65

  Peru

63

75

5.663

0.934

1.249

0.674

0.530

0.092

0.034

 

66

  Kosovo

78

NL

5.662

0.855

1.230

0.578

0.448

0.274

0.023

 

67

  Moldova

55

80

5.640

0.657

1.301

0.620

0.232

0.171

0.000

 

68

  Turkmen.

59

94t

5.636

1.016

1.533

0.517

0.417

0.199

0.037

 

69

  Hungary

75

43

5.620

1.171

1.401

0.732

0.259

0.061

0.022

 

70

  Libya

68

130

5.566

0.985

1.350

0.553

0.496

0.116

0.148

 

71

  Philippines

72

99

5.524

0.775

1.312

0.513

0.643

0.120

0.105

 

72

  Honduras

91

124

5.504

0.620

1.205

0.622

0.459

0.197

0.074

 

73

  Belarus

67

74

5.483

1.039

1.498

0.700

0.307

0.101

0.154

 

74

  Turkey

69

81

5.483

1.148

1.380

0.686

0.324

0.106

0.109

 

75

  Pakistan

80

139

5.472

0.652

0.810

0.424

0.334

0.216

0.113

 

76

  Hong Kong

71

NL

5.430

1.405

1.290

1.030

0.524

0.246

0.291

 

77

  Portugal

89

26

5.410

1.188

1.429

0.884

0.562

0.055

0.017

 

78

  Serbia

73

67

5.398

0.975

1.369

0.685

0.288

0.134

0.043

 

79

  Greece

87

46

5.358

1.154

1.202

0.879

0.131

0.000

0.044

 

80

  Tajikistan

96

83

5.358

0.474

1.179

0.598

0.503

0.214

0.136

 

81

  Montenegro

83

90

5.347

1.017

1.279

0.729

0.259

0.111

0.081

 

82

  Croatia

77

35

5.321

1.115

1.161

0.737

0.380

0.120

0.039

 

83

  Domin. Rep.

86

90

5.302

0.982

1.441

0.614

0.578

0.120

0.106

 

84

  Algeria

53

132

5.295

0.979

1.154

0.687

0.077

0.055

0.135

 

85

  Morocco

84

119

5.254

0.779

0.797

0.669

0.460

0.026

0.074

 

86

  China

79

73

5.246

0.989

1.142

0.799

0.597

0.029

0.103

 

87

  Azerbaijan

85

69

5.201

1.024

1.161

0.603

0.430

0.031

0.176

 

88

  Lebanon

88

92

5.199

0.965

1.166

0.785

0.292

0.187

0.034

 

89

  Macedonia

92

63

5.185

0.959

1.239

0.691

0.394

0.173

0.052

 

90

  Jordan

74

94t

5.161

0.822

1.265

0.645

0.468

0.130

0.134

 

91

  Nigeria

95

146

5.155

0.689

1.172

0.048

0.462

0.201

0.032

 

92

  Kyrgyzstan

98

114t

5.131

0.530

1.416

0.594

0.540

0.281

0.035

 

93

  Bosnia/Herz.

90

62

5.129

0.915

1.078

0.758

0.280

0.216

0.000

 

94

  Mongolia

100

113

5.125

0.914

1.517

0.575

0.395

0.253

0.032

 

95

  Vietnam

94

107

5.103

0.715

1.365

0.702

0.618

0.177

0.079

 

96

  Indonesia

81

82

5.093

0.899

1.215

0.522

0.538

0.484

0.018

 

97

  Bhutan

97

122

5.082

0.796

1.335

0.527

0.541

0.364

0.171

 

98

  Somalia

93

179t

4.982

0.000

0.712

0.115

0.674

0.238

0.282

 

99

  Cameroon

107

152

4.975

0.535

0.891

0.182

0.454

0.183

0.043

 

100

  Bulgaria

108

48

4.933

1.054

1.515

0.712

0.359

0.064

0.009

 

101

  Nepal

99

151

4.880

0.425

1.228

0.539

0.526

0.302

0.078

 

102

  Venezuela

82

102

4.806

0.996

1.469

0.657

0.133

0.056

0.052

 

103

  Gabon

118

133

4.758

1.036

1.164

0.404

0.356

0.032

0.052

 

104

  Palest. Terr.

103

NL

4.743

0.642

1.217

0.602

0.266

0.086

0.076

 

105

  South Africa

101

111

4.724

0.940

1.410

0.330

0.516

0.103

0.056

 

106

  Iran

108

117

4.707

1.059

0.771

0.691

0.459

0.282

0.129

 

107

  Ivory Coast

128

NL

4.671

0.541

0.872

0.080

0.467

0.146

0.103

 

108

  Ghana

131

147

4.657

0.592

0.896

0.337

0.499

0.212

0.029

 

109

  Senegal

115

118

4.631

0.429

1.117

0.433

0.406

0.138

0.082

 

110

  Laos

NL

142

4.623

0.720

1.034

0.441

0.626

0.230

0.174

 

111

  Tunisia

02