THE DON JONES INDEX…

 

GAINS POSTED in GREEN

  LOSSES POSTED in RED

        9/17/18…  15,821.83

        9/10/18…  15,811.26        6/27/13…  15,000.00

      

 (THE DOW JONES INDEX:  9/24/18… 26,154.67; 9/10/18… 25,916.54; 6/27/13… 15,000.00)

 

 

LESSON for September 17, 2018 – BLAST from the PAST!

 

Perhaps appropriately, Forbes Magazine… the journal for those who have more than they need, but want still more, more more… featured, in this year’s 9/11 travel section, a visit to the homestead of one of the Founding Fathers.  Those straight, rich white men are decried, these days, as vicious slaveholders and/or imperialists, but exert a fascination and respect, even in 2018.  Forbes, however, didn’t include the usual suspect hidey holes of Mount Vernon, Monticello or the Hermitage, but steered vacationing readers towards the homestead of one of the few Presidents not to be tainted by slavery… not the humble log cabin birthsite of Abraham Lincoln, but, rather, Peacefield, the domicile of America’s second President in the irrefutably antislavery village of Quincy, Mass.  John Adams really only wanted to be a farmer,” Forbes correspondent Regina Cole notes in her pictorial of the fine house and gardens. 

So liberty-loving Americans should be hailing Adams as the true progenitor of the “land of the free and the home of the brave” – but not so fast.  Privileged sophomores in costly private collages should be marching about bearing signs of his profile with which to cudgel the Jeffersonian/Jacksonian townies and agitating for POTUS 2 to replace Washington on that people’s currency most familiar to Don Jones… the one dollar bill.  Of late, historians are rediscovering Adams as, indeed, a role model for certain trends, traits and personalities of our modern day… but not for his abolitionism (see Attachment One), nor even the mixed blessing of a strong Federal government and not for the near-saintly imagery celebrated in the Broadway hagiography of his ally-turned-enemy, Alexander Hamilton, or, more recently, on display at the funerals of John McCain and Aretha Franklin…

Tight, fussy little Adams is, instead, the progenitor of the flamboyant Donald J. Trump, strange as it may seem; in one important aspect as applicable to “liberty” – that middle provision of those God-granted blessings in the Declaration of Independence, of which he was one of a Committee of Five editing the words drafted by his enemy-turned-comrade Jefferson – ostensibly to prevent further proscriptions upon free speech as had stained the colonial epoch since the 1730s when John Peter Zenger, publisher of the New York Weekly Journal so offended the Governor, Bill Cosby (!) that the Coz had him tried for sedition.  Under Colonial law, truth was not a defense to this charge “since the greater appearance there is of truth in any malicious invective, so much the more provoking it is.” And this was deemed especially the case with true attacks on those in power, as they would have “a direct tendency to breed in the people a dislike of their governors and incline them to faction and sedition.”

The jury would have its own response… nullification.  Zenger was acquitted and Cosby was mortally outraged,

What is the relevance today?  Read a newspaper, lately, watched television… even Fox News!... or searched out any but the most venomous podcasts or blogs of late?

It’s no great secret that Trump hates the media… well, most of it, except for Fox, maybe Forbes, the Wall Street Journal (on occasion), Breitbart and a few other imitators further into the thicket of the alt-right.  The lying Washington Post and failing New York Times.  The big three networks and CNN… the Devil’s own elevator music.  Salon and HuffPost and the mean-spirited little journals like Mother Jones, the New Republic and, of course, most of the foreign press.  RINOs as infest the National Review, Weekly Standard and the Ronnish, as opposed to Randish libertarians of Reason.  Hollywood.  The comedians.  The Democrats…

And people who read and write books… Omarosa, Bob Woodward, the still-Anonymous New York Times weasel, soon, that woman not to be mentioned until our Index…

Enemies of America, one and all!

But is he prepared to do anything about it?

Bloomberg’s Cass Sunnstein published a syndicated op-ed on Wednesday, noting that the President of the United States calls the press "the enemy of the people" and asks “Does he also have a problem with freedom of speech?”

You see, there’s this matter of that damned Constitution, into which the devious Jefferson inserted not only an amendment… the First… protecting freedom of speech, but also extended it to freedom of the press.

“Curses!” the President must have exclaimed upon hearing of the Times op-ed.

This year, for the first time since at least Richard Nixon, the leader of one of our major political parties has pledged to limit press freedom by restricting criticism of his prospective rule, stated the liberal website Pro Publica less than a month after the 2016 election.  “But Nixon’s threats were private, revealed only by his own taping system, while Donald Trump’s are very public, loud and clear.”

Time and technology have gifted the no-longer novel social and electronic media with as vile a cabal of schemers and dreamers as the old school media in the view of Trump… and more than a few other Republicans of slightly better repute.  They’ve accused Google of rigging their search engines to delegitimize conservative voices and tweak their famous and incomprehensible algorithms to deny the right its place in the sun and thereby, claims POTUS "controlling what we can & cannot see." He thinks that is "a very serious situation" and promises that it "will be addressed!"

“These are serious charges,” Sunnstein stated, adding that Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, has confirmed that the White House is "taking a look at" whether Google's search engine should be regulated. His complaint is based on… not a serious study of Google's algorithm but a recent post from a conservative blog, PJ Media, whose author candidly acknowledges that her results are "not scientific."

In other words, concludes Sunnstein, Trump lacks evidence to justify a regulatory effort by the federal government toward "addressing" Google's supposed effort to shut out "Republican/Conservative & Fair" media.  Nonetheless, his principal economic adviser is exploring whether to recommend or to go forward with regulation.

“In essence, the president of the United States is accusing Google of a form of sedition, and calling on his government to punish it. He might want to consider the text of the Virginia Resolution, written by James Madison in response to the Alien and Sedition Acts.”

The Alien and Sedition Acts, explains Terri Halperin, author of“The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

were a set of four laws – “the Naturalization Act, the Alien Enemies Act, the Alien Friends Act, and the Sedition Act.”

Said Acts are John Adams’ legacy to America (with a little help from the “heroic” Hamilton).

The second President (and first to be defeated for re-election) was “not a man of the world,” according to biographer David McCullough.  “He enjoyed no social standing.  He was an awkward dancer and poor at cards.  He never learned to flatter…” (and like Nixon, but unlike Trump)… “there was no money in his background.”

A Federalist and Washington’s Vice President (which post he despised, for being tasked with the sorting of applicants for patronage, which duties his personal integrity prohibited him from exploiting, as others would gleefully do in the future) he was elevated in his own right after eight years by an electoral majority of 71-68 over Jefferson (who became Vice President under terms of the electoral protocols, soon amended).  His overriding goal became entry into the British-French war on the side of the former. France had not only deposed and guillotined the monarchial and clerical classes (with a few exceptions like the canny ex=bishop Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord) that P2 strove to emulate, it had been stopping American shipping bound for London, seizing property and arresting sailors as pirates… when Adams sent diplomats (including the still-relevant Eldridge Gerry) to Paris, they were treated rudely, and solicited for bribes by three anonymous creatures of Talleyrand, known only as X, Y and Z.

McCullough, who strives to treat his subject with the gravitas and respect due a President, seemed inclined to blame the worst of the Acts on the proximity of war… that and the High Federalists (foremost of whom was Hamilton) who saw in the French Revolution an unconscionable assault on privilege and monarchism and his wife Abigail, a far more ardent and militaristic partisan than her husband. 

Historian Charles Slack dates the Sedition Acts to the conviction of a workman overheard in a tavern while speaking out against the Federalists, but prosecution of journalists quickly escalated. Benjamin Franklin Bache (a namesake, grandson and former secretary to Franklin himself who published the Philadelphia Aurora), even before the Acts were ratified by Congress on July 10, 1798 by a vote of 44-41.  One David Brown Anti-Federalist activist and erector of a “liberty pole” in Dedham, Ma. fell afoul of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase (aka “Old Bacon Face”), an anti-Federalist turned High Federalist – perhaps in exchange for his appointment – who rewarded his patrons by insisting Brown be tried after pleading guilty and sentenced him to eighteen months and a $480 fine.  The guilty were given sentences of only a few months or (in Brown’s case) years… but such were the conditions in the prisons of the time that some, in fact, died while incarcerated and the imposition of excessive fines enabled the Federalists to keep their adversaries (like Brown, personally sanctioned by Adams) locked up for far longer than their sentences.

The roundup of Republican journalists escalated… Thomas Cooper, a British-born colleague of the scientist J. B. Priestly and publisher of the Sunbury and Northumberland (Pa.) Gazette.  James T. Callender (a personal antagonist of presiding Justice Samuel Chase) received nine months, Matthew Lyon, an irascible Congressman from Vermont who had previously garnered notoriety by engaging a rival on the floor of Congress.  James Griswold of Connecticut gave Lyon a good thumping with a cudgel; Lyon responded by seizing fireplace tongs and assailing Griswold until the scrap was broken up.  A bevy of Congressmen broke up the scrap but Federalist resentment prompted a sedition trial and conviction and Lyon was sentenced to four months in prison.

But, as often is the case, the Federalists overreached.  Their political foes in the Fourth Estate might have been intimidated, but most ordinary Americans, for or against the President, were indifferent except in private.  On July 29, 1798, after a Federalist militia, the Association of Young Men, fired an artillery salute to Adams, one Brown Clarke remarked that they were “firing at his arse”, after which a drunken boatman, Luther Baldwin replied: “I don’t care if they fire through it.”  The Federalist publican, gravely offended, found a willing colludor in a young, zealous US Attorney, Lucius Horatio Stockton, who pursued Baldwin for six months until… after the death of Washington gave credence that Presidents could die and anti-Federalists could kill them… he indicted Baldwin and Clarke for sedition.

The trial dragged on for fifteen months – the defendants finally angering Stockton by changing their pleas to guilty.  Clarke was fined fifty dollars, Baldwin $150 and, as Slack contends: “the fines cost the Federalists much more in terms of derision and abuse from the Republican press.”

And is perhaps the reason why current A.G. Sessions has refrained from prosecuting the comedienne Kathy Griffin for displaying a badly rendered effigy of Trump’s bloody head.

It may well be that the ridicule and fear emanating from this case turned the (rather small) middle ground of electors against Adams as positing an America where any apolitical citizen could be accused (truly or falsely) of sedition and locked up.  Jefferson won an undisputed victory in 1800 – Stockton reaped his reward from Adams by becoming one of his lame duck appointees (to Secretary of War), but the now Republican Senate refused to confirm the nomination.

On March 1, 1801, Jefferson took office and three of the four Sedition Acts expired… the Republican President refusing to extend it.  Callender and Brown, the only prisoners still incarcerated, were freed… Brown disappeared into obscurity, Callender turned to drinking and Federalism, outraged over Jefferson’s affair with Sally Heming (and his refusal to pay the seditionist’s fine).  He was found drowned, presumably accidentally, in 1803.

 

McCullough and Slack both observed, in the Second President, a number of traits that could be applied to the 45th.  Though John Adams (unlike Trump) was an intellectual powerhouse, went a pre-election New Republic comparison his fiery disposition caused him problems throughout his political career. As biographer John Ferling has noted, “Adams’s great failing seemed to be his volcanic temper, which could explode with such suddenness and so little provocation that some of his colleagues feared that passion occasionally eclipsed reason.”

Like Trump, a Salon profile noted in July, “Adams was also a thin-skinned president, who chafed at the giggles over his moniker “His Rotundity,” and railed against what he considered deceptive and false characterizations of his administration by certain journalists.”

Like Trump, Adams was constantly churning his cabinet and grew almost paranoid that Pickering, in particular, was out to get him.  Like Trump, Adams was assailed by both the Jeffersonian Republicans and the High Federalists (the Tea Party of his time).  He feared and distrusted immigrants… at that time, mainly French aristocrats fleeing the Terror and the slave revolts of Haiti as well as the “wild Irish” whose hatred of the Crown led them to join with the Republicans.  But he also had a free hand with pardons… when three rebellious Amish farmers were sentenced to hang for treason, he commuted their sentences, infuriating Hamilton.  And, having stayed out of war for the duration of his term, the young nation’s economy, military (especially the Navy) and standing among the nations of the world all prospered.

Upon leaving office, McCullough lauded: “His bedrock integrity, his spirit of independence, his devotion to country, his marriage, his humor, and a great underlying love of life (that) were all still very much intact.”

Will the Trump legacy hold such positive aspects to balance the negative?

Tom Shachtman of the Daily Beast posits a Trumptastic checklist of actions, these being…

Go after the media for dissing the president? Check.

Define treason as anything anti-administration? Check.

Restrict immigration? Check.

Make deportations easier? Check.

Tighten citizenship requirements? Check.

“It’s the 220th anniversary of the Alien & Sedition Acts of 1798, the forebear of Trump’s anti-immigrant, media-bashing, attention-distracting rulings. Those Acts ramped up the American populace’s anger and directed it away from a tepid economy and ingrained elitism and toward the government’s homeland political enemies.”

The “seditious” half of the Acts were contained in two provisions of the U.S. Code, remained on the books and were (rarely, most often in the aftermath of the Civil War) employed by an apoplectic government to swat such flies of license as buzz up from time to time to time…

18 U.S. Code § 2384 - Seditious conspiracy

If two or more persons in any State or Territory, or in any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, conspire to overthrow, put down, or to destroy by force the Government of the United States, or to levy war against them, or to oppose by force the authority thereof, or by force to prevent, hinder, or delay the execution of any law of the United States, or by force to seize, take, or possess any property of the United States contrary to the authority thereof, they shall each be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than twenty years, or both.

(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 808; July 24, 1956, ch. 678, § 1, 70 Stat. 623; Pub.

 L. 103–322, title XXXIII

, § 330016(1)(N), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2148.)

 

18 U.S. Code § 2385 - Advocating overthrow of Government

Whoever knowingly or willfully advocates, abets, advises, or teaches the duty, necessity, desirability, or propriety of overthrowing or destroying the government of the United States or the government of any State, Territory, District or Possession thereof, or the government of any political subdivision therein, by force or violence, or by the assassination of any officer of any such government; or

Whoever, with intent to cause the overthrow or destruction of any such government, prints, publishes, edits, issues, circulates, sells, distributes, or publicly displays any written or printed matter advocating, advising, or teaching the duty, necessity, desirability, or propriety of overthrowing or destroying any government in the United States by force or violence, or attempts to do so; or

Whoever organizes or helps or attempts to organize any society, group, or assembly of persons who teach, advocate, or encourage the overthrow or destruction of any such government by force or violence; or becomes or is a member of, or affiliates with, any such society, group, or assembly of persons, knowing the purposes thereof—

Shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than twenty years, or both, and shall be ineligible for employment by the United States or any department or agency thereof, for the five years next following his conviction.

If two or more persons conspire to commit any offense named in this section, each shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than twenty years, or both, and shall be ineligible for employment by the United States or any department or agency thereof, for the five years next following his conviction.

As used in this section, the terms “organizes” and “organize”, with respect to any society, group, or assembly of persons, include the recruiting of new members, the forming of new units, and the regrouping or expansion of existing clubs, classes, and other units of such society, group, or assembly of persons.

(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 808; July 24, 1956, ch. 678, § 2, 70 Stat. 623; Pub. L. 87–486, June 19, 1962, 76 Stat. 103; Pub. L. 103–322, title XXXIII , § 330016(1)(N), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2148.)

Ignored, but never repealed, the gist of the Acts lay dormant until World War I, which saw an upsurge in pro-patriotic and anti-immigrant (mostly German, but also Chinese) legislation and the Espionage Act of 1917 was amended by the Sedition Act of 1918, which expanded the scope of the Espionage Act to any statement criticizing the Government of the United States. These Acts were upheld in 1919 in the case of Schenck v. United States, where the Supreme Court ruled that, while “Generally, a person may be punished for sedition only when he or she makes statements that create a clear and present danger to rights that the government may lawfully protect”…  First Amendment protections could be overridden when speech became “of such a nature and used in such circumstances a to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils which Congress has a right to prevent.”  (Schenck v. United States, 249 U.S. 47, [1919]).

Prosecutions declined until the next outbreak of war when,

In 1940, the Alien Registration Act, or "Smith Act", was passed in 1940, which made it a federal crime to advocate or to teach the desirability of overthrowing the United States Government, or to be a member of any organization which does the same. It was used against both Nazis and Communists, usually resulting in convictions until 1957 in the case of Yates v. United States, by ruling that teaching an ideal, no matter how harmful it may seem, does not equal advocating or planning its implementation.

In Yates, eleven Communists were charged with violation of the Smith Act, but SCOTUS heldm 6-1 that: “To violate the Smith Act, one must encourage others to take some action, not simply hold or assert beliefs.”  Chief Justice Harlan’s majority opinion held that: “In failing to distinguish between advocacy of forcible overthrow as an abstract doctrine and advocacy of action to that end,” while Associate Justice Black concurrence was rather sharper…

“Doubtlessly, dictators have to stamp out causes and beliefs which they deem subversive to their evil regimes. But governmental suppression of causes and beliefs seems to me to be the very antithesis of what our Constitution stands for. The choice expressed in the First Amendment in favor of free expression was made against a turbulent background by men such as Jefferson, Madison, and Mason – men who believed that loyalty to the provisions of this Amendment was the best way to assure a long life for this new nation and its Government....”

Curiously, the only dissenting Justice was Tom Clark whose son, Ramsey, would gain fame (or notoriety) as an arch-liberal during and after the Vietnam War.  FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover called the decisions "the greatest victory the Communist Party in America ever received." President Dwight Eisenhower evaded questions about the decisions at a press conference, but wrote a letter to the Chief Justice after reports that he was "mad as hell" about them.

The empire had better luck in hauling up enemies of the people through the House Un-American Activities Committee during the Cold War – left-wing journalist Alexander Cockburn, in fact, alleges that Trump’s political mentor was the attorney Roy Cohn, who counseled Sen. Joe McCarthy during the trials until the Senator went off the rails, accusing Eisenhower of subversion and becoming an alcoholic.

Attempts to muzzle the press also fared poorly… the case of Miami Herald Publishing Co. v. Tornillo, decided in 1974, involved an effort by a political candidate to take advantage of a state law giving him a "right of reply" to a negative editorial. The court ruled that the First Amendment did not permit government to correct what it saw as unfairness. For that reason, the "right of reply" law was unconstitutional.

Shutting down the even the most lying of the Lying Media will be an uphill climb for the Administration – perhaps not least because Attorney General Jeff Sessions, already burned over his decision to proceed with the prosecutions of two corrupt Republican Congressmen (“from safe seats!” Trump wailed) and the paucity of support in Congress… even with a Republican majority.  Perhaps mindful of incurring incoming fire from their local newspapers, TV and radio stations and the national media, all but a few gunslinging G.O.P. pols (like Rand Paul, who proposed lie detector tests for all the President’s men) have avoided commenting on the Times op-ed and Google controversies.

Perhaps the President is hoping that Republicans will hold on to or, even, increase their majorities in the House and Senate, affording them a shot of courage and him the legislative cover to, as Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Mo) advised… before the Special Counsel flipped Paul Manafort. Michael Cohen and such… “make them squeal”.

But conservatism… even in its debased, modern form… doesn’t always hold hands with fascism.  No less a bleeding heart than the late Justice Antonin Scalia advised, the First Amendment does not allow public officials to suppress speech "because of disapproval of the ideas expressed."

Trump may have better luck making an end run around the First Amendment by strengthening libel laws and hauling his enemies into civil, not criminal courts.  British libel laws are much stronger than the American and, while it is difficult, if not impossible, to garner criminal convictions, the cost of defending libel actions… particularly those where the rich and powerful sue ordinary working journalists… are onerous.

Trump himself is on the record as plotting to quash unpleasant media attention, saying that most reporters are “absolute dishonest, absolute scum.” He’s said that “I think the media is among the most dishonest groups of people I’ve ever met. They’re terrible.”

In February he pledged that “one of the things I’m gonna do if I win, and I hope that I do, and we’re certainly leading, is I’m gonna open up our libel laws so when they write purposely negative and horrible and false articles, we can sue them and win lots of money. We’re gonna open up those libel laws. So that when the New York Times writes a hit piece that is a total disgrace, or when the Washington Post, which is there for other reasons, writes a hit piece, we can sue them and win money rather than have no chance of winning because they’re totally protected.”

In 2006, Pro Publica recalls, he brought such a suit against a book that asserted he had wildly overstated his wealth. He lost the case on the merits as well as for failure to prove fault. But the Washington Post reported that “Trump said in an interview that he knew he couldn’t win the suit but brought it anyway to make a point. ‘I spent a couple of bucks on legal fees, and they spent a whole lot more. I did it to make [author Tim O’Brien’s] life miserable, which I’m happy about.’” Trump has also sued the Chicago Tribune and comedian Bill Maher, and threatened to sue the New York Times (more than once), ABC, the Daily Beast, Rolling Stone, the Huffington Post, reporter David Cay Johnston, TV host Lawrence O’Donnell and comedian Rosie O’Donnell… before training his sights on Google, he also “seemed to threaten to force Jeff Bezos to divest himself of the Post, asserting that it had been purchased to obtain political influence, and declaring that such purchases should be forbidden.

Asked in June if his stance on the press would continue as president, he said, “Yeah, it is going to be like this… You think I’m gonna change? I’m not going to change.” He repeated his view that “I am going to continue to attack the press. I find the press to be extremely dishonest. I find the political press to be unbelievably dishonest.”

“It is cold comfort,” Pro Publica alleged, that = although it may be some warning to Republicans inclined to go along— “Adams was not only defeated for re-election after passage of those laws, but lost the White House to Thomas Jefferson and his close associates James Madison and James Monroe for a quarter of a century, while Adams’ Federalist Party never really recovered.”

Adams and Jefferson died on the same Fourth of July, 1826, but the battle over the First Amendment resonates today… with Americans divided almost as equally as they were in the elections of 1796 and 1800.

Russiagate, Stormygate… the prospect of impeachment should the House and Senate flip… all of these have engendered fear in what is now the Republican party.

In defense of the President, Timothy Benson of Øcensor asked:  “Do we see a movement from could be moving from sedition to outright treason from some in the left? Is there a move from many within the Democratic party to not only resist to the point of the insurrection against the president to outright plotting to overthrow this duly elected administration? I would say so.”

Citing Sarah Silverman, Chelsea Handler and, as ever, Rosie O’Donnell, Benson accuses the liberal media of “broadcasting what these Hollywood liberal cupcakes have to say. What is more, they glorify them in their sedition, the leftist senators and congressmen, they go to the left’s celebration where they openly call for this behavior and stand in an ovation of the actors as they call this out.”

Michael Walsh is an American Book Award-winning novelist and contributor to Breitbart and the National Review who alleges Aaron Burr, who shot Hamilton in a duel, founded the modern Democratic Party.   “If one man besides George Washington can be said to have set the American experiment on its future course – in this case not for good but for ill – that man is Burr.”  The duel embodied the struggle between the Federalists and the Democrats, and a two-party conflict has been waged ever since.

Darker views proliferate… from the left and right, even the middle!  Old friends become enemies old enemies become new allies of convenience.  The “military/security” complex and its political and media agents will not permit Trump to normalize relations with Russia contends the Institute for Political Economy’s Paul Roberts.  “The military/security complex assassinated President John F. Kennedy for working toward peace with Soviet leader Khrushchev. To get rid of President Nixon, who made too many arms control agreements with the Soviets and opened to China, the military/security complex used its asset, the Washington Post, to orchestrate the “Watergate crisis” that the military/security complex used to force Nixon’s resignation.”  They framed poor, innocent Maria Butina and are openly inciting sedition against the President of the United States.

Who can Trump rely on? Only the “deplorables,” and they are unorganized and will experience retribution once Trump is removed.  Then, Putin and the Russians will realize the true situation, and “understand that war or surrender is their only option.”

Dueling Dons have started competing petitions on change.org.  One Michael McVeigh has obtained nearly nine of the necessary ten thousand signatures to…

Charge the Democrat Party with Sedition

“It is time for all Patriotic Americans to make our stand. We have had enough of the corrupt, treasonous, obstructionist, hypocritical Democrat Party trying to destroy our country and overthrow our lawfully elected President and his Administration.

On the other hand, Galbraith Tennyson called on America to…

Arrest Donald Trump for either sedition or treason.

 “Because making a false statement so close to a federal election regarding the President's citizenship is dangerous to the security of the United States and could cause civil unrest. As is crying fire in a crowded building, deliberately causing civil unrest with a falsehood should not be subject to free speech protections.”

(Before closing, this petition garnered 8 (eight) supporters.)

 

Amused, incensed or indifferent to the carnival in Washington, wary of Florence and the suddenly hostile weather, Don Jones could take solace in the rising of wages and the Dow and falling of unemployment – mitigated by a drop in government revenues as exacerbated the debt as Congress continues wrangling over the coming year’s budget and by a small but painful increase in prices at the pump.

At least, the President assures us, since America is now the world’s leading petroleum producer, the money is just being transferred from our left hand to our right.

 

THE DON JONES INDEX

CHART of CATEGORIES w/VALUE ADDED to EQUAL BASELINE of 15,000

(REFLECTING… approximately… DOW JONES INDEX of June 27, 2013)

See a further explanation of categories here

                                                                          ECONOMIC INDICES (60%)

                                                                                                                                                 

DON JONES’ PERSONAL ECONOMIC INDEX (45% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

        INCOME

(24%)

6/27/13

LAST

CHANGE

NEXT

9/10/18

9/17/18

OUR SOURCE(S) and COMMENTS

 

Wages (hourly, per capita)

9%

1350 points

9/17/18

+0.35%

Oct. 2018

1,494.59

1,494.59

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/wages   22.73

 

Median Income (yearly)

4%

600

9/17/18

+0.06%

9/24/18

683,62

684.03

debtclock.org/    32.198

 

Unempl. (BLS – in millions

4%

600

9/17/18

    nc

Oct. 2018

1,167.12

1,167.12

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000     3.9

 

Official (DC - in millions)

2%

300

9/17/18

-4.16%

9/24/18

529,05

551.04

http://www.usdebtclock.org/      6.230

 

Unofficl. (DC - in millions)

2%

300

9/17/18

-3.94%

9/24/18

522.44

543.93

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    11,902

 

Workforce Participation

Number (in millions)

Percentage (DC)

2%

300

9/17/18

+0.25%

 -0.19%

9/24/18

284.58

284.04

Americans in/not in workforce (mil.)

In: 155,620 Out 96,348 Total 251,968

http://www.usdebtclock.org/  61.76%

 

WP Percentage (ycharts)*

1%

150

7/9/18

 -0.32%

Oct. 2018

150.59

150.59

http://ycharts.com/indicators/labor_force_participation_rate 62.70

 

OUTGO

(15%)

 

 

Total Inflation (aggregate)

7%

1050

8/13/18

+0.2

9/24/18

965.48

965.48

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.2

Inflation – Food

2%

300

8/13/18

+0.1

9/24/18

276.74

276.74

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.1

               - Gasoline

2%

300

8/13/18

+3.0

9/24/18

290.28

281.57

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +3.0

               - Medical Costs

2%

300

8/13/18

-0.2

9/24/18

261.20

261.72

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm      -0.2

               -  Shelter

2%

300

8/13/18

+0.3

9/24/18

279.46

279.46

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.3

       WEALTH

(6%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dow Jones Index

2%

300

9/17/18

+0,92

9/24/18

467.57

471.87

Dow – 26,154.67

 

Homes – Sales

             -  Valuation

1%

1%

150

150

8/27/18

Sales  -0.74%        Valu. -2.64%

Oct. 2018

195.48        239.08

195.48        239.08

http://www.realtor.org/research-and-statistics nc

Sales (M):  5.34 Valuations (K):  269.6

 

 

Debt (Personal)

2%

300

9/17/18

+0.04%

9/24/18

256.58

256.50

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    58,099

 

 

 

AMERICAN ECONOMIC INDEX (15% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

      NATIONAL

(10%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues (in trillions – tr.)

2%

300

9/17/18

 -3.32%

9/24/18

393,23

380.19

debtclock.org/       3.295

 

Expenditures (in tr.)

2%

300

9/17/18

+0.12%

9/24/18

250.77

250.37

debtclock.org/       4.202

 

National Debt (tr.)

3%

450

9/17/18

+0.03%

9/24/18

339.36

339.14

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    21,480

 

Aggregate Debt (tr.)

3%

450

9/17/18

+0.08%

9/24/18

361.04

360.75

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    71,184

 

       GLOBAL

(5%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Debt (tr.)

2%

300

9/17/18

-0.02%

9/24/18

314.67

314.62

http://www.usdebtclock.org/   6.224

 

Exports (in billions – bl.)

1%

150

9/17/18

-1.26%

Oct. ‘18

167.36

167.36

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/Press-Release/current_press_release/exh1.txt 211.1

 

Imports (bl.)

1%

150

9/17/18

-0.38%

Oct. ‘18

127.54

127.54

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/Press-Release/current_press_release/exh1.txt 261.2

 

Trade Deficit (bl.)

1%

150

9/17/18

-7.58%

Oct. ‘18

100.50

100.50

Do the math.

 

     

                                                                         SOCIAL INDICES (40%)

LIBERTY and SECURITY INDEX           (15%)

ACTS of MAN

(12%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Peace

3%

450

9/17/18

  -0.1%

9/24/18

439.81

439.37

Bolton sanctions International Criminal Court.  NoKo/SoKo summot planned after no-nukes parade.

 

Terrorism

2%

300

9/17/18

 +0.1%

9/24/18

222.98

222.76

Trump kicks Palestinians out of US.  MS-13 kills mother of murdered boy at his memorial service.

 

 

Politics

3%

450

9/17/18

  -0.3%

9/24/18

443.06

441.73

Justice Kaufman claims high school rape accusations unjustified.  Mike Pompeo renames State the Dept, of Swagger.  Paul Manafort flips – cooperating with Mueller.  Rand Paul proposes Lie Detectors for All! 

 

Economics

3%

450

9/17/18

 +0.2%

9/24/18

445.14

446,03

Trump/critics wrangle over 4,2% GDP growth.  US climbs over Saudis to become world’s biggest oil producer. 

 

Crime

1%

150

9/17/18

 +0.2%

9/24/18

233.93

233.46

Romance author of How to Murder your Hosband… murders her husband.  Trucker kills 6 in Bakersfield, Mariachi murderers kill 5 in Mexico. Border agent takes out 4 women in border towns.  Looters follow Florence to Carolinas, gas gougers get rich.

 

 

ACTS of GOD

(6%)

(with, in some cases, a little… or lots of… help from men, and a few women)

 

 

Environment/Weather

3%

450

9/17/18

 -2.0%

9/24/18

326.37

318.88

Not only Florence but Olivia in Hawaii and a Philippines typhoon.  Pipeline burst spills 8,000 gallons of fuel oil into river.  Trump deregulates leaky methane pipes and tanks.  California promises 100% renewable energy by 2045. 

 

Natural/Unnatural Disasters

3%

450

9/17/18

 -0.5%

9/24/18

370.06

368.21

As Florence rages, Trump calls Puerto Rican recovery a success and blames Democrats for inflating death toll.  Gas explosions level houses, kill boy outside Boston.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIFESTYLE and JUSTICE INDEX          (15%)

 

Science, Tech. & Education

4%

600

9/17/18

+0.1%

9/24/18

637.01

637.65

Apple announces a new iPhone and raises prices from $1000 to $1100.  Space X sells first tourist to the moon ticket to mystery traveler.

 

Equality (economic/social)

4%

600

9/17/18

-0.1%

9/24/18

730.40

729.67

Les Moonves latest MeToo victim, quits after 6 more women accuse.  McDonalds’ workers go on strike over sexual harassment.  As detained immigrant  kids  rise from 2,400 to 12,800 over 16 months, Trump proclaims a tripling of tent cages.

Health

4%

600

9/17/18

-0.3%

9/24/18

527.70

526.12

Bad breakfast… toxic eggs and plastic shards in sausage.  Zimbabwe cholera joined by outbreak of monkeypox.  Pollsters find 3% of seniors use pot.  Horrors!

 

Freedom and Justice

3%

450

9/17/18

-0.2%

9/24/18

514.67

513.64

Elizabeth Smart protests as her kidnapper/rapist released early.  MGM survivors offered money not to sue… $500!  GoFundMe scammers busted for exploiting homeless.  Google accused of installing spyware on kids gaming apps.

 

 

All miscellaneous incidents*

(transient and cultural)

4% (7%?)

400

9/17/18

+0.2%

9/24/18

437.73

438.61

Miss New York wins Miss America.  NASA will sell ads on rocketships (risky if your sponsor explodss).  Trump fist-pumps at 911 ceremony but ollsters find 42- 38 majority don’t want Federal holiday.  Cosby child actor job-shamed at Trader Joes gets TV gig.  Tennis umpires vow to boycott Serena,  Red Sox first to clinch division.  Stormy writes a book,  Paul McCartney gets first #1 in 36 years.  Camel goes berserk in Pittsburgh, injures 7.  Happiest state in US is Hawaii (despite hurricanes and volcanoes) saddest is West Virginia.

 

 

 

 

 

The Don Jones Index for the week of September 10th through September 16th, 2018 was UP 10.57 points.

The Don Jones Index is sponsored by the Coalition for a New Consensus: retired Congressman and Independent Presidential candidate Jack “Catfish” Parnell, Chairman; Brian Doohan, Administrator/Editor.  The CNC denies, emphatically, allegations that the organization, as well as any of its officers (including former Congressman Parnell, environmentalist/America-Firster Austin Tillerman and cosmetics CEO Rayna Finch) and references to Parnell’s works, “Entropy and Renaissance” and “The Coming Kill-Off” are fictitious or, at best, mere pawns in the web-serial “Black Helicopters” – and promise swift, effective legal action against parties promulgating this and/or other such slanders.

Comments, complaints, donations (especially SUPERPAC donations) always welcome at feedme@generisis.com or: speak@donjonesindex.com

BACK

 

ATTACHMENT ONE

Actually Adams, unlike John Quincy Adams, was no abolitionist.  In a letter to two abolitionists in 1801, the then-President… while stating that he always employed freemen in his various business enterprises… took the abolition movement to task, as in this excerpt…

“Although I have never Sought popularity by any animated Speeches or inflammatory publications against the Slavery of the Blacks, my opinion against it has always been known and my practice has been so conformable to my sentiment that I have always employed freemen both as Domisticks and Labourers, and never in my Life did I own a Slave. The Abolition of Slavery must be gradual and accomplished with much caution and Circumspection. Violent means and measures would produce greater violations of Justice and Humanity, than the continuance of the practice. Neither Mr. Mifflin nor yourselves, I presume would be willing to venture on Exertions which would probably excite Insurrections among the Blacks to rise against their Masters and imbrue their hands in innocent blood.

“There are many other Evils in our Country which are growing, (whereas the practice of slavery is fast diminishing,) and threaten to bring Punishment on our Land, more immediately than the oppression of the blacks. That Sacred regard to Truth in which you and I were educated, and which is certainly taught and enjoined from on high, Seems to be vanishing from among Us. A general Relaxation of Education and Government. A general Debauchery as well as dissipation, produced by pestilential philosophical Principles of Epicurus infinitely more than by Shews and theatrical Entertainment. These are in my opinion more serious and threatening Evils, than even the slavery of the Blacks, hateful as that is.

“I might even add that I have been informed, that the condition, of the common Sort of White People in some of the Southern states particularly Virginia, is more oppressed, degraded and miserable than that of the Negroes.

“These Vices and these Miseries deserve the serious and compassionate Consideration of Friends as well as the Slave Trade and the degraded State of the blacks.”

See here for a full transcript.

 

And, far from being a saintly martyred hero, Slack and McCullough portray Hamilton as a personage sort of resemblinc

Steve Bannon?