THE DON JONES INDEX…

 

GAINS POSTED in GREEN

LOSSES POSTED in RED

    2/5/20…  14,972.65

  1/29/20…  14,972.91         

    6/27/13…  15,000.00

 

 

(THE DOW JONES INDEX:  2/5/20…28,807.63; 1/29/20…28,734.45; 6/27/13… 15,000.00)

 

 

LESSON for Febuary 5, 2020 – D-DAYZ!

 

It has been a week, to put it mildly, that has shaken and baked America.  A week full of days of democracy at its best and worst, of dismissal and disgust.   Days of delegitimacy, discord and duncery – determination and despair.   A week for patriots and poltroons, with the comically incompetent on display.  A week that will live in infamy (or, at least, low misdemeanorhsip).  That, as House Manager Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) cited the advice of another icon of the past, Benjamin Franklin, reminding the Founding Fathers what they had, and still were in the process of creating… a Republic “if you can keep it.”

Look at the evidence of just this past week.  An effective dismissal of the charges against President Trump by refusing to call witnesses to (some of) his impeachable offenses on Friday, followed by football’s 2019-20 summation on Sunday evening… the Superbowl.  Monday brought chaos in the Iowa primaries, Tuesday the President’s prematurely self-congratulatory State of the Union and today, February fifth, the Senate will presumably vote along party lines (with maybe one or two dissenters upon a resolution of conviction which requires a two-thirds majority) to not only acquit the President, but to exonerate the President and even, one may well conclude, elevate his status to that of King Donald… the honors and emoluments thereto violating several provisions of the United States Constitution

Moreover, the Senate’s refusal to call witnesses to testify to the guilt or innocent of the Chief Executive calls into question the efficacy of the sixth Amendment to said Constitution (more on this next week); a charter amendment included in the so-called Bill of Rights without which the citizns of the nascent Republic would not permit the establishment of a state.

 

DISMISSAL DAY (Friday, January 31st)

The two Articles of Impeachment, although brief, were extremely complicated… and, to the DJI, insufficient (ignoring more emotional atrocities such as the battlefield abandonment of our Kurdish allies and entrapped civilians to massacres by their Turkish, Russian and Iranian enemies.  Over the third week in January, Democratic House Managers (aka the prosecution) pitched eleven rule changes to the Senate, all of which were shot down.

Inasmuch as complicated issues can often be boiled down when the necessity of explaining this White House and this Congress to young, innocent minds, the to-the-point explanation of newsforkids.net is illustrative… (see more as Attachment Four)

“During the investigation, the House requested many documents and asked people from the White House to talk to Congress. The White House refused these requests. As a result, Congress never heard from the people most closely connected with the event.”

People like Pat Philbin of the President’s Defense Team (See Attachment Two) who, again, raised the “everybody does it” defense first promulgated by Mulvaney and expounded on by Trump, O.J., and Klaus von Bulow mouthpiece Alan Dershowitz who, a week ago Monday, had tolled off a long list of perfidious Presidents guilty of Trumpcrime – and worse .  (See Attachment Six)

Pesident Obama, himself, refused to turn over a lot of documents to the House in the Fast and Furious investigation,” Philbin reminded the gathering.  “His attorney general was held in contempt, but no one thought that was an impeachable offense.”

Or people like Pam Bondi who, in reply to an inquiry from Ted Cruz (R-Tx) as to what Joe Biden knew about his son Hunter’s appointment to and tenure on the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisima, reminded the gathering that “Joe Biden was the point man” for Ukrainians investigating a corrupt company, Burisma, and its oligarch owner, Zlochevsky, also corrupt. 

“Hunter Biden is paid $83,000 a month -- a month!  (other sources pegged the Biden boy’s lucre at a paltry $30,000 per month) to sit on that board with no experience in energy, no experience in the Ukraine, doesn't speak the language and we clearly know that he had a very fancy job description and he did none of those things. He attended one or two board meetings -- on in Monaco and then he went on a fishing trip with Joe Biden's family in Norway.

“The entire time Joe Biden knows that this oligarch is corrupt. Everyone knows that. There are news reports everywhere. No one will dispute that. In fact, it raised eyebrows worldwide but the vice president by his account never once asked his son to leave the board. 

“We wouldn't be sitting here if he did.”

On the other hand, Jason Crow (D-Nv) played video clips of the President with an independent (though biased) outside reporter and a Republican insider.

 

BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DONALD TRUMP, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 e-mails that are missing. I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press. Let's see if that happens (ph).

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS, FORMER WHITE HOUSE COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR: The campaign this time around, if foreigners, if Russia, if China, if someone else offers you information on an opponent, should they accept it or should they call the FBI?

TRUMP: I think maybe you do both. I think you might want to listen, I don't -- there's nothing wrong listening. If somebody (a snitch in the Biden camp, perhaps?) called from a country, Norway, we have information on your opponent. Oh? I think I'd want to hear it.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Do you want that kind of interference in our elections?

TRUMP: It's not an interference, they have information, I think I'd take it.

DANIEL GOLDMAN, MAJORITY COUNSEL: Let's more to the third excerpt that I mentioned related to Vice President Biden. And it says, "The other thing, there's a lot of talk about Biden's son." This is President Trump speaking, "That Biden stopped the prosecution and a lot of people want to find out about that. So whatever you can do with the attorney general would be great. Biden went around bragging that he stopped the prosecution, so if you can look into it, it sounds horrible."

TRUMP: Well I would think that if they were honest about it, they'd start a major investigation into the Bidens. It's a very simple answer.

If we feel there's corruption -- like I feel there was in the 2016 campaign, there was tremendous corruption against me. If we feel there's corruption, we have a right to go to a foreign country.

And by the way, likewise, China should start an investigation into the Bidens because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with -- with Ukraine. (END VIDEO CLIP)


With conviction an apparent impossibility… barring some new and flagrant offense against decency by the President (always a prospect), lead House Manager Adam Schiff (D-Ca) and his cohorts (again, see Attachment Two) held out hope that testimony from witnesses like Acting Chief of Staff and former budgeteer Mick Mulvaney, Russian spook Lev Parnas and, especially, the National Securitarian-turned book author John Bolton would so disgust America that not only would Trump be defeated in November, but his Senatorial toadies would also fall.

With all one hundred members checked in, present and voting, solicitation of, testimony by and cross-examination of witnesses would have required fifty-one Senators so inclined, whereas only forty seven of the pack were Democrats.  Thus, four Republicans had to be persuaded to cross the line, vote with the House Managers and incur the Wrath of Trump.

Throughout the proceedings, attention had centered upon four moderate Republicans… Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, old Obama foe Mitt Romney of Utah and retiring Lamar Alexander of Tennessee.

While Collins and Romney informed the inquisitors and the world of their intent to call witnesses in advance, Alexander seemingly punctured the House balloon on Thursday, by announcing that he would remain loyal to the President despite conduct that he considered “inappropriate”, because the evidence clearly determined so… so thoroughly that the calling of witnesses was superfluous.  The voters, rather than the Senate, should rule thumbs up or down upon his regime… and, should Trump again corrupt the electoral process to win a second term, well, too bad.  (See Attachment Three)

This raised the possibility of an unprecedented Constitutional crisis… were Murkowski to vote with the House impeacher-ers, the vote would be tied fifty to fifty.  And this posed a potentially troublesome problem… would the deciding vote be cast by Vice-President Mike Pence (a slam-dunk for the Defense) or by the Presiding Chief Justice, John Roberts (a probable vote for acquittal, but one never knows).

Previously, the conservative, pro-Trump Daily Signal reported that the Democrat-controlled House had impeached Trump on Dec. 18, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress with regards to his July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy

(In that call, the two leaders briefly talked about Trump’s interest in Zelenskyy’s doing America “a favor” by investigating two things: interference by Ukraine in the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, and the high-paying role of former Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter, on the board of a Ukrainian energy company while his father was point man for U.S. policy on Ukraine.)

The Signal (on Jan. 6th) cited Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who had said House Democrats no longer have a say in what he calls an impeachment “fantasy” despite the fact that the only other two trials to result in impeachment and reach the Senate… those Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1999… had included “witnesses in some form”.

“Never, never in the history of our country has there been an impeachment trial in which the Senate was denied the ability to hear from witnesses, yet the Republican leader seems intent on violating that precedent and denying critical evidence to this body and to the American people,”  said Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer Schumer, a former House member first elected to the Senate in November 1998. He sided with the 42nd president on three critical votes: against articles of impeachment in the House Judiciary Committee and again on the House floor in December 1998, and, after joining the Senate, to acquit Clinton in February 1999 and, at that time, said: “It seems to me that no good case has been made for witnesses.” 

Defense counsel Philbin agreed that “Every presidential impeachment in our history, including even the Nixon impeachment proceedings, which didn't actually lead to an impeachment, have used charges that include specific violations of the law and the criminal law.

Andrew Johnson was charged mostly in counts that involved violation of the Tenure of Office Act, which the Congress had specifically made punishable by fine and imprisonment, and even wrote into the statute that violation would constitute either a high crime or a high misdemeanor, one of those terms, to make it clear that it was going to be used to trigger an impeachment.

“In the proceedings in the Nixon impeachment inquiry, each of the articles of impeachment there, except for the -- the obstruction of Congress charge, which is sort of treated separately on the obstruction theory, included specific violations of law. There were specific violations alleged in the second article of impeachment, which is often sort of referred to loosely as the "abuse of power article." It wasn't actually titled, you know, "abuse of power."

“It didn't charge abuse of power. The specifications there were violations of law: violating the constitutional rights of citizens, violating the laws governing executive branch agencies, unlawful electronic surveillance using the CIA and others -- specific violations of law.

“And clearly, in the Clinton impeachment, President Clinton was impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice. Those are crimes.

At the close of the day, Friday, Murkowski apparantly concurred – stating that she would “vote to block additional witnesses and evidence in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial.” (US News and World Report)

She added that because of the partisanship of the impeachment, "There will be no fair trial in the Senate. I don't believe the continuation of this process will change anything. It is sad for me to admit that, as an institution, the Congress has failed."

Her vote “all but sealed the deal on the Senate's decision to block witnesses in the impeachment trial, sparing Republicans the spectacle of John Bolton testifying against Trump under oath,” opined the conservative Washington Examiner, before warning that the vote “could prove a Faustian bargain for Republicans, one they'll likely rue in the end.”

And, as the candidates (including the four Senators stuck in Washington for the duration of the trial) were fleeing the capital for Iowa, and while the 49ers and the Chiefs were battling it out for gridiron supremacy, the Chief Executive was battling another headache… the statement by Iowa’s Joni Ernst that, should he win in November, Joe Biden would be immediately impeached before even enjoying the succor of his coronation… er, inauguration.

“I think this door of impeachable whatever has been opened,” Ernst told Bloomberg News on Sunday (no doubt warming the testicles of its owner, to whom the former Veep is his primary conservative opponent.

 

And then it was Sunday, and the scintillating comeback of the Kansas City Chiefs which, perhaps, gave the House Managers hope that miracles do happen.

And then Monday, and the Iowa caucuses rolled round, shattering donkey dreams and raising the ghosts of 1972 and 1984 as some flawed and flagellated nominee staggers into the arena to face King Donald.

 

Prior to Decision Day… today, presumably around 4 PM… Eileen Sullivan of the Lyin’ New York Times posited “Five Takeaways from Trump’s Impeachment Trial” (See Attachment… go figure!... Five)

With a focus on history, House managers (made) their final arguments,” invoking patriots of the past and present - from the Founding Fathers to the strangest of strange political icons… John Bolton.

Sen. Crow posed a rebuttal to Dershowitz’s concept of an imperial Presidency.  Professor Dershowitz and the other counselors to the president have argued that if the president thinks that something is in his interest, than it is by definition in the interest of the American people. We have said throughout this process that we cannot and should not leave our common sense at the door. The logical conclusion this argument is, is that the president is the state, that his interests are the nation’s interests, that his will is necessarily ours. You and I and the American people know otherwise, and we do not have to be constitutional scholars to understand that this is a position deeply at odds with our constitution and our democracy.”

Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Al)… two of those considered among the small contingent of the undecided, declared that they were still undecided, and that the process was painful.

 

“The facts of President Clinton’s misconduct pale in comparison to Nixon and do not hold a candle to Donald Trump,” argued Schiff.  “Lying about an affair is morally wrong and when under oath it is a crime, but it had nothing to do with his duties in office. The process being the same, the facts of President Trump’s misconduct being far more destructive than either past president, what then accounts for the disparate result in bipartisan support for his removal? What has changed?”

          (For one – during the Clinton hearings, at least, it was the Republicans on the offensive while Democrats       were trying to stand by their man.)

In responding to the House Managers, Kenneth Starr compared the President to the disrespected voters whose 2016 verdict and 2020 reckoning was imperiled, to Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King and waxed folksy and patriotic in a discourse aimed, obviously, at the Trump base.

“Mr. Chief Justice, members of the Senate, Majority Leader McConnell, Minority Leader Schumer, House Impeachment Managers and they’re very able staff, as World War I, the war to end all wars, was drawing to a close, an American soldier sat down at a piano and composed a song. It was designed to be part of a musical review for his Army camp out on Long Island, Suffolk County. The song was God Bless America. The composer, of course, was Irving Berlin who came here at the age of five, son of immigrants who came to this country for freedom. As composers are want to do, Berlin worked very carefully with the lyrics. The song needed to be pure. It needed to be above politics, above partisanship. He intended to be a song for all America. But he intended it to be more than just a song, it was to be a prayer for the country.”

(See more statements at https://www.rev.com/blog/transcript-category/congressional-testimony-hearing-transcripts.)

 

And then, everybody went home, turned on the tube and watched the Democratic caucus debacle late into the night, or until they fell asleep, or not at all.

While the votes were being counted and the wheels of the caucus app (from the shadowy Shadow Inc.) were coming off the rails, the final statements of the preferred candidates were pronounced and gathered (See Attachment Seven)

 

And the hits just kept on coming.  Last night, President Trump issued his State of the Union message to a sharply, starkly divided Congress and an even more angry America.  He began by refusing to shake Speaker Pelosi’s proffered hand (she retaliated by ostentatiously tearing up his speech as soon as he concluded) and threw a few partisan jabs like denouncing Socialism and awarding the Medal of Freedom to Rush Limbaugh upon learning that he had cancer (which probably prevented a massive walkout or razzberry-fest)

Otherwise, however, it was a full-on Reagan recap of the booming economy… jobs up, the stock market up, treaties signed, evil persons obliterated.  A performance that, coming from another President, would have jacked his positivity rating up into the mid to high 60s but, as it was Trump, he has at least pulled approximately even in the hearts and minds of the voters.

Given the anticipated aquittal/exoneration within a few hours, the Democratic debacle in Iowa and the prospect of Djonald really Unchained being crowned King (with Donald Junior as his probable successor, unless Erik does a Prince Andrew), it was a banner week for POTUS.

 

As for that other Donald, Don Jones, well he and the family could not help applauding… or nodding… as to the President’s having made America great (that is, if he had a full-time job with bennies, retirement money socked away in an account or safe and soaring stock (like Trump’s hated Amazon).  The Don was down about the width of a Mayor Pete v. Socialist Bernie Iowa outcome (still undecided)  Things were sunny if Mister Jones was a Kansas City (Missouri) Republican, cloudy if a San Francisco Democrat… or if the family was returning from their long-planned trip to China.  There was plenty of entertainment, will be plenty more this week, so if the Joneses were go-along-to-get-along-gofers with little interest in the underpinnings of freedom and democracy… well, it’s a leap year so only 333 more days until Superbowl LV.

 

 

 

      THE DON JONES INDEX

 

                    CHART of CATEGORIES w/VALUE ADDED to EQUAL BASELINE of 15,000

 

                                (REFLECTING… approximately… DOW JONES INDEX of June 27, 2013)

 

                                                          See a further explanation of categories here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                 ECONOMIC INDICES (60%)

 

 

DON JONES’ PERSONAL ECONOMIC INDEX (45% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

CATEGORY

VALUE

BASE

 

RESULTS

 

SCORE

SCORE

OUR SOURCE(S) and COMMENTS

 

  INCOME

(24%)

6/27/13

LAST

CHANGE

NEXT

1/28/20

 2/5/20

SOURCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wages (hourly, per capita)

9%

1350 pts.

1/28/20

+0.31%

2/12/20

1,347.73

1,347.73

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/wages  23.79

 

Median Income (yearly)

4%

600

1/28/20

+0.06%

2/12/20

601.92

602.28

debtclock.org/    33,743

 

Unempl. (BLS – in millions

4%

600

1/28/20

+2.86%

2/12/20

600.00

600.00

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000   3.5

 

Official (DC – in millions)

2%

300

1/28/20

-0.19%

2/12/20

304.64

304.64

http://www.usdebtclock.org/ 5,701

 

Unofficl. (DC – in millions)

2%

300

1/28/20

=0.21%

2/12/20

281.48

282.07

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    10.910

 

Workforce Participation

Number (in millions)

Percentage (DC)

2%

300

1/28/20

 

+0.23%

-0.01%

2/12/20

300.33

300.36

In 158,991 Out 95,611 Total: 254,602

http://www.usdebtclock.org/  62.44%

 

WP Percentage (ycharts)*

1%

150

1/28/20

  nc

2/12/20

149.76

149.76

http://ycharts.com/indicators/labor_force_participation_rate  63.20

 

OUTGO

(15%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Inflation

7%

1050

1/28/20

+0.2%

2/12/20

1047.90

1047.90

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.2

 

Food

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.2%

2/12/20

299.40

299.40

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.2

 

Gasoline

2%

300

1/28/20

+2.8%

2/12/20

291.60

291.60

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +2.8

 

Medical Costs

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.4%

2/12/20

298.80

298.80

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm       nc

 

Shelter

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.2%

2/12/20

299.40

299.40

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEALTH

(6%)

 

 

Dow Jones Index

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.25%

2/12/20

301.99

302.76

https://quotes.wsj.com/index/DJIA  28,807.63

 

Sales (homes)

Valuation (homes)

1%

1%

150

150

1/28/20

- 1.55%

- 3.55%

2/12/20

155.32

151.77

   155.32

151.77

http://www.realtor.org/research-and-statistics

Sales (M):  5.54 Valuations (K):  274.5

 

Debt (Personal)

2%

300

1/28/20

+1.18%

2/12/20

299.79

298.44

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    61,669

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             AMERICAN ECONOMIC INDEX (15% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

NATIONAL

(10%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues (in trillions)

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.03%

2/12/20

300.72

300.81

debtclock.org/       3,513

 

Expenditures (in tr.)

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.07%

2/12/20

299.80

299.60

debtclock.org/       4,568

 

National Debt (tr.)

3%

450

1/28/20

+0.15%

2/12/20

448.27

447.58

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    23,256

 

Aggregate Debt (tr.)

3%

450

1/28/20

- 0.09%

2/12/20

445.68

445.26

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    75,630

 

 

GLOBAL

 

(5%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Debt (tr.)

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.15%

2/12/20

300.75

   300.31

http://www.usdebtclock.org/   6,882

 

Exports (in billions – bl.)

1%

150

1/28/20

+0.72%

2/12/20

150.36

150.36

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/Press-Release/  208.6

 

Imports (bl.)

1%

150

1/28/20

-1.03%

2/12/20

152.55

152.55

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/Press-Release/  251.7

 

Trade Deficit (bl.)

1%

150

1/28/20

-9.51%

2/12/20

164.26

164.26

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/Press-Release/  43.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOCIAL INDICES (40%)  

 

 

ACTS of MAN

(12%)

 

 

 

  World Peace

3%

450

1/28/20

-0.1%

2/12/20

436.60

436.16

US imposes new travel ban on Nigeria and six other non-Mideast nations.  UK finally lurches into a sloppy Brexit.

 

Terrorism

2%

300

1/28/20

+0.2%

2/12/20

299.28

299.05

London stabbing rampage and bomb discoveries.  Four shot in front of church in Riviera Beach, FL.

 

Politics

3%

450

1/28/20

+0.2%

2/12/20

453.15

454.96

Iowa debacle and candidate flaws spark new talk of new (old) faces.   Kerry?  Hillary? Bloomburg doubles ad budget to something hundred million (or maybe a billion, by now).  State Sen. Garcia (R-Mt) proposes shooting “Socialists”.

 

Economics

3%

450

1/28/20

 -0.2%

2/12/20

454.96

454.05

Chinese stock market collapses under Coronavirus.  Dow drops but bounces back.  American consumers polled, they’re happy.  Hummer unveils an electric truck.  Winners: Tesla, Facebook.  But Forever 21 is now Forever Gone.

 

Crime

1%

150

1/28/20

 -0.1%

2/12/20

301.20

301.80

Discovered: Kobe’s stolen jersey and giant Tijuana drug tunnel.  Idaho cult mother sought for missing kids.  Crackdown on dating apps that cater to sickos and psychos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACTS of GOD

(6%)

(with, in some cases, a little… or lots of… help from men, and a few women)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environment/Weather

3%

450

1/28/20

nc

2/12/20

453.60

453.60

Severe storms batter Miami and ruin a Harry Styles concert.  Blizzards strike Utah, on their way East.  Guardians at Mexican butterfly sanctuary murdered by loggers,

 

Natural/Unnatural Disaster

3%

450

1/28/20

+0.3%

2/12/20

444.59

443.26

Troubles in Turkey… earthquake and avalanche.  And the Iowa caucuses qualify… pundits say Democrats “shanked it”, others blame Bernie for goofy intersectionalist laws.

 

 

LIFESTYLE/JUSTICE INDEX    (15%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science, Tech, Education

4%

600

1/28/20

+0.1%

2/12/20

602.70

603.30

Fancy new Subarus have innumerable warning signals.   Iowa again – Shadow-y voting app fails, pollgoers reduced to… paper and pencil!  Some students now given mental health days off.

 

Equality (econ./social)

4%

600

1/28/20

+0.2%

2/12/20

599.39

600.59

Two Latinas shake up Superbowl halftime show.  New York Times uncovers misogyny at… Victoria’s Secret!  Really?  Also #METOOd: yet another Olympics coach and the CEO of Ocean Spray (one of those guys in waders cracking laconic jokes in cranberry bog.

 

Health

4%

600

1/28/20

+0.1%

2/12/20

597.60

598.20

Coronavirus called worse than SARS.  (Remember?)  Doctors advise focus on facts, not fear.  US life expectancy finally rising due to drops in cancer and overdoses.  Cure for peanut allergies found?  WalMart swimming in sour milk sea and Florida confiscates tainted shark fins.

 

Freedom and Justice

3%

450

1/28/20

-0.1%

2/12/20

450.45

450.00

Arrested wifekiller Fotis does an Epstein in prison.  Mississippi and Alabama lockups investigated as snakepits of disease and violence.  Fresno cops cuff and beat Latino teen having epileptic seizure.  Cancer patient gets ten months for stealing $100 worth of food.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS and TRANSIENT INDEX        (7%)

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural incidents

3%

450

1/28/20

+0.1%

2/12/20

451.37

451.82

Vanessa Bryant shares happy Kobe videos.  Superbowl MVP Mahomes going to Disneyworld (not Land) as video of sleeping SB fan gets played over and over and Trump tweets his congratulations to “the great state of Kansas”.   Old (21) American Sofia Kenin wins Australian Open.  Pam Anderson/Jon Peters marriage lasts 12 days.

 

Miscellaneous incidents

4%

450

1/28/20

-0.1%

2/12/20

449.65

448.75

Man run down by rageaholic deer.  Public urination sparks Wild West shootout.  George Costanza lookalike says something racist in Michigan while a State Senator there busted for Superdrunk” driving.  RIP to NFL’s Chris Doleman, TV producer Fred Silverman and mystery authoress Mary Higgins Clark.  Rush Limbaugh gets lung cancer, but also a Medal of Freedom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Don Jones Index for the week of January 30th through February 4th, 2020 was DOWN 0.26 points.

 

The Don Jones Index is sponsored by the Coalition for a New Consensus: retired Congressman and Independent Presidential candidate Jack “Catfish” Parnell, Chairman; Brian Doohan, Administrator/Editor.  The CNC denies, emphatically, allegations that the organization, as well as any of its officers (including former Congressman Parnell, environmentalist/America-Firster Austin Tillerman and cosmetics CEO Rayna Finch) and references to Parnell’s works, “Entropy and Renaissance” and “The Coming Kill-Off” are fictitious or, at best, mere pawns in the web-serial “Black Helicopters” – and promise swift, effective legal action against parties promulgating this and/or other such slanders.

Comments, complaints, donations (especially SUPERPAC donations) always welcome at feedme@generisis.com or: speak@donjonesindex.com

 

 

 

BACK

 

See further indicators at Economist – https://www.economist.com/economic-and inancialndicators/2019/02/02/economic-data-commodities-and-markets    


 

Attachment One – from various

 

TIMELINE – Debates

 

February 7, 2020

Eighth Democratic Primary Debate

Watch On: ABC, WMUR-TV, and Apple News
Location: Manchester, New Hampshire
Sponsors: TBD
Moderators: TBD
Candidates: TBD

February 19, 2020

Ninth Democratic Primary Debate

Watch On: NBC News and MSNBC
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Sponsors: TBD
Moderators: TBD
Candidates: TBD

February 25, 2020

Tenth Democratic Primary Debate

Watch On: CBS News and Congressional Black Caucus Institute
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
Sponsors: TBD
Moderators: TBD
Candidates: TBD

March, 2020

Eleventh Democratic Primary Debate

Watch On: TBD
Location: TBD
Sponsors: TBD
Moderators: TBD
Candidates: TBD

April, 2020

Twelfth Democratic Primary Debate

Watch On: TBD
Location: TBD
Sponsors: TBD
Moderators: TBD
Candidates: TBD

 

December 31 – 4th quarter financial reports due (but some low money losers will drag the process out).

 

 

 

PRIMARIES

 

 

Feb. 11

New Hampshire primaries*

Feb. 15

South Carolina primary*

Feb. 22

Nevada caucus

Feb. 25

Nevada caucus*

Feb. 29

South Carolina primary

 

March 3

 

Alabama primaries

SUPER TUESDAY!

 

Attachment Two – from Business Insider… biographies from wiki (see links)

       

House managers:

 

·         Adam Schiff of California, Chair of the House Intelligence Committee

·         Jerry Nadler of New York

·         Zoe Lofgren of California

·         Val Demings of Florida

·         Hakeem Jeffries of New York

·         Jason Crow of Colorado

·         Sylvia Garcia of Texas

 

Defense counsel:

 

·         Pat Cipollone, the White House counsel, who is spearheading the defense team

·         Mike Purpura, Cipollone's deputy in the White House counsel's office

·         Patrick Philbin, another deputy in Cipollone's office

·         Eric Herschmann, an ordinary lawyer

·         Jay Sekulow, Trump's personal lawyer

·         Jane Raskin, Trump's personal lawyer

·         Ken Starr, the former Whitewater independent counsel

·         Robert Ray, who succeeded Starr as independent counsel in the Whitewater investigation

·         Alan Dershowitz, a Harvard emeritus law professor and constitutional and criminal-law scholar

·         Pam Bondi, the former attorney general of Florida

 

Attachment Three – from the Washington Post

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/01/31/lamar-alexanders-yes-he-did-it-statement-trump-annotated/

Lamar Alexander’s yes-he-did-it statement on Trump, annotated 

Aaron Blake

 

Aaron Blake

Senior political reporter, writing for The Fix

Email Bio Follow

January 31 at 9:16 AM

 

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) late Thursday night announced he’ll be a crucial vote against calling new witnesses or admitting new evidence in President Trump’s impeachment trial. With that decision, it appears Trump will not only be acquitted, but that former national security adviser John Bolton won’t be called to testify. The best Democrats can hope for is a 50-50 tie on witnesses, with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. electing to break the tie. Few expect him to do so.

But in making his announcement, Alexander carved out a nuanced position: While the president’s lawyers have said he did nothing wrong, Alexander disagrees. In fact, he says Democratic House impeachment managers proved their case — that Trump withheld aid and a White House meeting for his desired investigations and that it was “inappropriate.” He said he just doesn’t think Trump’s actions are worthy of removal from office.

It’s a statement worth parsing, which is what we’ll do below via annotation. To see an annotation, click on the yellow, highlighted text.

“I worked with other senators to make sure that we have the right to ask for more documents and witnesses, but there is no need for more evidence to prove something that has already been proven and that does not meet the United States Constitution’s high bar for an impeachable offense.

“There is no need for more evidence to prove that the president asked Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and his son, Hunter; he said this on television on October 3, 2019, and during his July 25, 2019, telephone call with the president of Ukraine. There is no need for more evidence to conclude that the president withheld United States aid, at least in part, to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Bidens; the House managers have proved this with what they call a ‘mountain of overwhelming evidence.’ There is no need to consider further the frivolous second article of impeachment that would remove the president for asserting his constitutional prerogative to protect confidential conversations with his close advisers.

“It was inappropriate for the president to ask a foreign leader to investigate his political opponent and to withhold United States aid to encourage that investigation. When elected officials inappropriately interfere with such investigations, it undermines the principle of equal justice under the law. But the Constitution does not give the Senate the power to remove the president from office and ban him from this year’s ballot simply for actions that are inappropriate.

“The question then is not whether the president did it, but whether the United States Senate or the American people should decide what to do about what he did. I believe that the Constitution provides that the people should make that decision in the presidential election that begins in Iowa on Monday.

“The Senate has spent nine long days considering this ‘mountain’ of evidence, the arguments of the House managers and the president’s lawyers, their answers to senators’ questions and the House record. Even if the House charges were true, they do not meet the Constitution’s ‘treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors’ standard for an impeachable offense.

“The framers believed that there should never, ever be a partisan impeachment. That is why the Constitution requires a 2/3 vote of the Senate for conviction. Yet not one House Republican voted for these articles. If this shallow, hurried and wholly partisan impeachment were to succeed, it would rip the country apart, pouring gasoline on the fire of cultural divisions that already exist. It would create the weapon of perpetual impeachment to be used against future presidents whenever the House of Representatives is of a different political party.

“Our founding documents provide for duly elected presidents who serve with ‘the consent of the governed,’ not at the pleasure of the United States Congress. Let the people decide.”

 

Attachment Four – from  newsforkids.net

Trump Impeachment Trial to End Without Witnesses

 

NFK Editors - February 3, 2020

 

The Senate impeachment trial comes after an investigation in the House of Representatives. The investigation led to two “articles of impeachment”, or charges, against Mr. Trump: “abuse of power” and “obstruction of Congress“.

The House, which is controlled by Democrats, began investigating Mr. Trump in early September after learning about a phone call between Mr. Trump and Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The phone call seemed to suggest that Mr. Trump was holding back $391 million from the Ukraine in order to force Mr. Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden, a Democratic politician who hopes to replace Mr. Trump as president.

The investigation was started after a phone call between Mr. Trump and Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky seemed to suggest that Mr. Trump was holding back money from the Ukraine in order to force Mr. Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden.
(Source: The White House [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.)

Though Mr. Trump described his call with Mr. Zelensky as “perfect”, many felt the president misused his power to help himself instead of the country.

During the investigation, the House requested many documents and asked people from the White House to talk to Congress. The White House refused these requests. As a result, Congress never heard from the people most closely connected with the event.

The Senate, which is controlled by Republicans, has worked closely with the White House to keep witnesses from being called at the trial. Still, Democrats hoped to get enough Republicans to pass a vote calling for witnesses. They needed four Republican votes.

The Senate, which is controlled by Republicans, has worked closely with the White House to keep witnesses from being called at the trial. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is shown above.
(Source: Senate.gov.)

The trial began without an agreement on witnesses. First, “Impeachment Managers” from the House of Representatives made the case against Mr. Trump.

Last week, Mr. Trump’s lawyers put on their defense, saying Mr. Trump hadn’t done anything wrong and that Democrats were using impeachment to try to get rid of a president they didn’t like.

Last week, Mr. Trump’s lawyers put on their defense, saying Mr. Trump hadn’t done anything wrong and that Democrats were using impeachment to try to get rid of a president they didn’t like. Pat Cipollone, above, is one of Mr. Trump’s lawyers.
(Source: Senate.gov.)

After the defense, Senators had time to ask questions of both the House Managers and Mr. Trump’s lawyers.

But the big question was whether at least four Republicans would vote for witnesses.

The pressure to bring witnesses grew as news came out about a book written by John Bolton, who worked closely with Mr. Trump. It was reported that Mr. Bolton’s book gives clear examples showing that Mr. Trump did exactly what Democrats are accusing him of.

Last week, news came out about a book written by John Bolton (above, right), who worked closely with Mr. Trump. It was reported that Mr. Bolton’s book gives clear examples showing that Mr. Trump did exactly what Democrats are accusing him of.
(Source: U.S. Dept.of State [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.)

But on Friday afternoon, when the Senate finally voted, only two Republican Senators – Susan Collins of Maine and Mitt Romney of Utah – voted for witnesses. In all, 51 Republicans voted against witnesses.

Many people thought Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander, above, might vote for witnesses, but he didn’t. Mr. Alexander said he didn’t need witnesses to know that what the president did was wrong. But he didn’t believe it was bad enough to remove Mr. Trump as president.
(Source: Lynn Freeny/DOE-Oakridge [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.)

With no witnesses, the trial is almost over. On Monday and Tuesday, Senators will give short speeches explaining their ideas on Mr. Trump’s impeachment. Then, late Wednesday afternoon, a final vote will be held on the two articles of impeachment.

Removing Mr. Trump from office would require two-thirds of the 100-member Senate. Since no Republicans have called for Mr. Trump to be removed, it’s almost certain that Wednesday’s vote will clear Mr. Trump.

 

Attachment Five – from the ny times

Five Takeaways From Trump’s Impeachment Trial

The two sides made their final speeches to senators with an eye toward the 2020 election.

By Eileen Sullivan

·         Feb. 3, 2020, 5:40 p.m. ET

House impeachment managers and President Trump’s defense team delivered their closing arguments on Monday with an eye toward history, but with little hope of changing any senator’s mind.

The arguments came on the same day that caucusgoers in Iowa will gather to narrow the Democratic field, and lawyers on both sides tried to appeal to 2020 voters in their arguments. The formal vote on whether to acquit Mr. Trump will take place on Wednesday. Here are the key takeaways from the closing arguments.

With a focus on history, House managers make their final arguments.

Invoking former President Abraham Lincoln, and the founding fathers Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, House impeachment managers delivered closing arguments written for the history books, and in some cases attempted to shame senators for not removing Mr. Trump from office.

“But all is not lost, even at this late hour. The Senate can still do the right thing,” one of the House impeachment managers, Representative Hakeem Jeffries, Democrat of New York, said on Monday. “America is watching. The world is watching. The eyes of history are watching. The Senate can still do the right thing.”

Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the lead House impeachment manager, directly called out the partisan divide that has defined the impeachment trial.

“I hope and pray that we never have a president like Donald Trump in the Democratic Party,” Mr. Schiff said. “And I would hope to God that if we did we would impeach him, and Democrats would lead the way.”

He, like Mr. Jeffries, invoked the language of moral leadership and national values, asking senators to do the right thing.

“It is said that a single man or woman of courage makes a majority,” Mr. Schiff said. “Is there one among you who will say ‘enough’?”

“America believes in a thing called truth. She does not believe we are entitled to our own alternate facts. She recoils at those who spread pernicious falsehoods. To her, truth matters. There is nothing more corrosive to a democracy than the idea that there is no truth,” Mr. Schiff said. “America also believes there is a difference between right and wrong. And right matters here.”

The defense closes its case, insisting there was no quid pro quo.

Mr. Trump’s lawyers returned on Monday to Mr. Trump’s original defense of his July 25 phone call with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine, ignoring disclosures since the start of the trial about the president’s motivations for freezing nearly $400 million in military aid for the country.

Michael Purpura, a deputy White House counsel, said, “First, the president did not condition security assistance or a meeting on anything in the July 25 call.”

And, Mr. Purpura added, “none of the House witnesses ever testified that there was any linkage between security assistance and investigations.”

Both statements are strictly true and echo Mr. Trump’s own words last year when questions mounted about Mr. Trump’s call with Mr. Zelensky. But the arguments do not take into account the larger context of the call or some witnesses’ testimony that they had concluded there was a link between security aid and investigations, even though they had no direct knowledge of one.

And the arguments do not address new details from Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser, John R. Bolton, revealed recently in an unpublished manuscript. In the manuscript, Mr. Bolton said the president told him that he intended to withhold the military aid until Ukraine agreed to the investigations. After days of arguments, the Senate voted against calling witnesses, such as Mr. Bolton, to testify.

Voters were on the minds of House managers and the defense during closing arguments.

With little hope of changing any of the senators’ minds on whether to acquit Mr. Trump on Wednesday, House managers and Mr. Trump’s lawyers focused instead on the upcoming election.

“As we speak, the president continues his wrongdoing, unchecked and unashamed,” Mr. Jeffries said. “President Trump remains a clear and present danger to our national security area and to our credibility around the world.”

Mr. Jeffries also suggested that letting the voters decide is a flawed plan.

“If we are to rely on the next election to judge the president’s efforts to cheat in that election, how can we know that the election will be free and fair?” he asked.

Mr. Trump’s defense team similarly framed closing arguments around a free and independent election.

“At the end of the day, this is an effort to overturn the results of one election and to try to interfere in the coming election,” one of Mr. Trump’s lawyers, Pat Cipollone, said, referring to a widely debunked theory that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 elections to help Democrats, as opposed to Russia being behind the effort to help Mr. Trump.

“The only appropriate result here is to acquit the president and to leave it to the voters to choose their president,” Mr. Cipollone said.

The president’s defense says his actions were appropriate even as some Republican senators speak out.

Some Republican senators have begun defending their upcoming vote to acquit Mr. Trump with the argument that while what the president did may have been inappropriate, it is not an impeachable offense.

Senator Lamar Alexander, a Tennessee Republican who is retiring, offered this defense last week, when he announced his vote against hearing new witness testimony in the trial. The measure to block witnesses was long seen as a decision to acquit the president, and Democrats had hoped Mr. Alexander would vote with them.

After Mr. Alexander’s response, several Republicans followed suit.

“Long story short, Senator Alexander most likely expressed the sentiments of the country as a whole as well as any single Senator possibly could,” Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and one of Mr. Trump’s most frequent defenders in the Senate, wrote on Twitter. “Those who hate Trump and wish to take the voters choice away in an unfounded manner, Sen. Alexander rightly rejected their arguments.”

As the trial comes to a close, a final vote is still to come.

The senators began delivering their own versions of closing arguments in the lead-up to a final vote at 4 p.m. Wednesday. Under the trial rules, the senators have been quiet while in the chamber, listening to arguments from the House managers and the president’s lawyers.

With the trial now in recess, senators will each have up to 10 minutes to speak during floor sessions Monday afternoon, Tuesday morning and Wednesday to make their own statements about why they intend to vote for or against Mr. Trump’s conviction.

In the midst of this, Mr. Trump will deliver the State of the Union address on Tuesday night without having been formally acquitted.

 

Attachment Sixfrom rev transcripts

Alan Dershowitz: (40:28)


In our long history, many presidents have been accused of abusing their power. I will now give you a list of presidents who in our history have been accused of abusing their power, who would be subject to impeachment under the House Manager’s view of the Constitution. George Washington, refusal to turn over documents related to the Jay Treaty. John Adams signing and enforcing the alien and sedition laws. Thomas Jefferson purchasing Louisiana without congressional authorization. I’ll go on. John Quincy Adams, Martin Van Bern, John Tyler, arbitrary despotic and corrupt use of the veto power. James Polk, here I quote Abraham Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln accused Polk of abusing his power of his office, contemptuously disregarding the constitution, usurping the role of Congress and assuming the role of dictator. He didn’t seek to impeach him. He just sought to defeat him. Abraham Lincoln. Abraham Lincoln was accused of abusing his power for suspending the writ of habeas Corpus during the Civil War.

Alan Dershowitz: (41:31)


President Grant, Grover Cleveland, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, William Taft, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan quote, “Concerning Iran contract… And now I say Professor Laurence Tribe said the following quote, “There in lies what appears to be the most serious breach of duty by the president, a breach that may well entail an impeachable abuse of power.” George H.W. Bush. The following was released today by the Clinton Gore campaign. In the past weeks, Americans had begun to learn the extent to which George Bush and his administration have abused their governmental power for political purposes. That’s how abuse of power should be used, as campaign rhetoric. It should be in statements issued by one political party against the other. That’s the nature of the term. Abuse of power is a political weapon and it should be leveled against political opponents. Let the public decide. That’s true. Barack Obama, the House committee on the judiciary, held an entire hearing entitled Obama Administration’s abuse of power. Now by the standards applied to earlier presidents, nearly any controversial act by a chief executive could be denominated abuse of power. For example, past presidents have been accused of using their foreign policy, even their war powers, to enhance their electoral prospects. Presidents often have mixed motives that include partisan personal benefits along with the national interest. Professor Josh Blackman, constitutional law professor, provided the following interesting example.

Alan Dershowitz: (43:08)

Quote, “In 1864 during the height of the Civil War, President Lincoln encouraged General William Sherman to allow soldiers in the field to return to Indiana to vote. What was Lincoln’s primary motivation?” The professor asks, “He wanted to make sure that the government of Indiana remained in the hands of Republican loyalists who would continue the war until victory. Lincoln’s request risks undercutting the military effort by depleting the ranks. Moreover, during this time, soldiers from the remaining states face greater risks than did the returning Hoosiers.” The professor continues. “Lincoln had dueling motives. Privately he sought to secure victory for his party, but the president as a president and as a party leader and Commander in Chief made a decision with life or death consequences.” Professor Blackman drew the following relevant conclusion from this and other historical events. He said, “Politicians routinely promote their understanding of the general welfare while in the back of their minds considering how these actions will affect their popularity. Often the two concepts overlap. What’s good for the country is good for the official’s reelection. All politicians,” he said, “understand that dynamic.” Like all human beings, presidents and other politicians persuade themselves that their actions seen by their opponents as self-serving are primarily in the national interest. In order to conclude that such mixed motive actions constituted abuse of power, opponents must psychoanalyze the president and attribute to him a singular self-serving motive.

(see entire transcript at https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/alan-dershowitz-defense-argument-transcript-trump-impeachment-trial-january-27

 

Attachment Seven – from rev.com

 

https://www.rev.com/blog/transcripts/transcript-speeches-at-the-iowa-caucuses-bernie-sanders-joe-biden-elizabeth-warren-andrew-yang-pete-buttigieg-amy-klobuchar-speak

 

 

Bernie Sanders Iowa Caucus Speech Transcript

Bernie Sanders: (00:08)
Thank you. Thank you. Let me begin.

Bernie Sanders: (00:24)
Let me begin by stating that I imagine, have a strong feeling that at some point, the results will be announced. When those results are announced, I have a good feeling we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa.

Bernie Sanders: (00:52)
And the message that Iowa has se