the DON JONES INDEX…

 

 

 

GAINS POSTED in GREEN

LOSSES POSTED in RED

 

 

 

9/10/21…  14,357.47 

  9/3/21…  14,361.00 

6/27/13…  15,000.00

 

(THE DOW JONES INDEX:  9/10/21…34,879.38; 9/3/21…35,443.86;6/27/13… 15,000.00)

 

 

LESSON for September 10, 2021 – NO MORE PLAYING with the PLAGUE!

 

So here’s where we stand,” President Joe declared today in his fomentation of a six-point-Plan to repress (if not suppress) the “pandemic of the unvaccinated” (as numerous TV doctors dub it), which keeps devouring victims and swelling like a hungry snake in a sewer of tasty rats.  “The path ahead, even with the Delta variant, is not nearly as bad as last winter. What makes it incredibly more frustrating is that we have the tools to combat Covid-19, and a distinct minority of Americans, supported by a distinct minority of elected officials, are keeping us from turning the corner. These pandemic politics, as I refer to, are making people sick, causing unvaccinated people to die.”

The Don Jones Index has been compiling data on the frequency of new infections and patient deaths since the early days of the pandemic last summer.

Take a look at Attachment One.  New infections and deaths rose and fell and rose and fell again until starting to decline in January as the vaxxs rolled out.  They continued to fall until late July, when a sudden spike… attributable to the Delta Variant, holiday gatherings, a loosening of travel and, above all, the politicization of vaxxing which, like masking, could be seen as disloyalty to President (then ex-President) Trump.  This rise only recently peaked and has begun to fall but… as the pessimists (or realists) among doctors and medical reseachers warn… new variants are on the way, some of which will not be affected by the existing Pfizer, Moderna and J&J vaccines (as well as pig dewormer and bleach).

With 160,000 new infections a day, the country is "still in pandemic mode ... That's not even modestly good control," Biden's chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, told Axios.

"You've got to get well below 10,000 (a day) before you start feeling comfortable," Fauci added.

Are the refuseniks simply expressing their concurrence with the American Dream of freedom, at any price, or loyalty… even to a disgraced public official?  Or are they the domestic strain of Al Qaeda or ISIS with suicide vests of virus strapped round their waists, ready to go off and immolate themselves, their families, their neighbors and their children or all the screaming memes at the football stadium or MAGA rally?  Should the government, in the name of public safety, step in and abrogate their liberties… and, if so, by what means?  Proof of vaccination is already being required for admission to private functions and events as well as some travel venues – from cruise ships to airlines.  The question of whether private or public employers can fire the refuseniks is already working its way though the courts.  And delegation to the states has created a patchwork of remedies… ranging from a “hands-off” posture (even state-sponsored prohibition of local laws mandating masks or vaxxes) to careful scrutiny, with considerable prohibitions imposed upon the unvaccinated.

With the emergence of the Delta Variant (ΔV) and further mutations on the horizon, the question now becomes whether the government can ramp up the pressure upon refuseniks.  Bribery has already been tried, to mixed success, and, in fact, the percentage of Americans who say they will not take the shot under any circumstances has fallen from about a third, to about a sixth.  But, of course, what people say and what they do are often two different things.

Imposition of criminal penalties for vaccine refusal is the Rubicon as presently divides the virtues of liberty and security.  Thereafter, the question… if the latter prevails… becomes the degree of punishment.  Unvaccinated persons can simply be arrested, bound, held down and shot up against their will.  Fines can be imposed or prison terms ordered.

"This is not about freedom or personal choice," Biden said during a Thursday address to the nation. "It's about protecting yourself and those around you, the people you work with, the people you care about, the people you love. My job as president is to protect all Americans."

President Joe’s Six Points are to…

Increase vaccinations among the unvaccinated with new vaccination requirements;

Continue to protect the vaccinated;

Keep our children safe and our schools open;

Increase testing and masking;

Protect our economic recovery; and

Improve the care of those who do get Covid-19.

 

A March podcast moderated by Julia Longoria and sponsored by The Atlantic cited the 1905 Jacobson v. Massachusetts decision which made clear that the government could mandate vaccination, arguing that collective good sometimes outweighs individual rights. (See excerpt as Attachment Two) But the line between the two is blurry.  More than two decades after Jacobson’s case, the Court used the same logic in another decision, one that podcast guest, chair of the history department at Brandeis University, and author of Pox: An American History, Michael Willrich said is among the “scariest U.S. Supreme Court decisions of all time.”

The fact-checking Verify site also verified Jacobson v. Massachusetts although noting “multiple important exemptions” (See Attachment Three)

Without specifying penalties, President Biden stated, in his message to America that: “I recently released the key parts of my P.P.P. (pandemic preparedness plan) so that America isn’t caught flat-footed with (sic) a new pandemic comes again, as it will. Next month I’m also going to release a plan in greater detail.”

 

Congressional refuseniks have no intention of waiting for another month –

And the Supreme Court has, through its decisions since Djonald Unashamed’s midnight replacement of Ruth Bader Ginsburg with Amy Coney Barrett, made clear its intent that five, maybe six members (Chief Justice John Roberts has blown with the wind this way and that, making him Djonald’s In Name Only (or DINO) will oppose anything and everything that the President and the Democrats advance, leaving the key life and death issues (not only Covid but Obamacare and healthcare in general, abortion, climate change and on and on) to the Congress and the states.

Nineteen Republican governors have unanimously denounced the Plan…

Gov. Greg Abbott (R-Tx): "Biden’s vaccine mandate is an assault on private businesses. I issued an Executive Order protecting Texans’ right to choose whether they get the COVID vaccine & added it to the special session agenda. Texas is already working to halt this power grab."

Gov. Kristi Noem, (R-S.D.): "This gross example of federal intrusion will not stand."

Gov. Brian Kemp, (R-Ga): "I will pursue every legal option available to the state of Georgia to stop this blatantly unlawful overreach by the Biden administration," wrote Gov. Brian Kemp, R-Ga.

Gov. Henry McMaster, (R-S.C.) tweeted: "The American Dream has turned into a nightmare under President Biden and the radical Democrats. They have declared war against capitalism, thumbed their noses at the Constitution, and empowered our enemies abroad. Rest assured, we will fight them to the gates of hell to protect the liberty and livelihood of every South Carolinian."

Gov. Doug Ducey, R-Ariz., wrote, "This dictatorial approach is wrong, un-American and will do far more harm than good.

To these, President Joe replied: “If they will not help, if those governors won’t help us beat the pandemic, I’ll use my power as president to get them out of the way.”

Biden is in good company – Several EU nations have imposed at least travel restrictions on the refusenik, and are ramping up the pressure.  CNBC reports crackdowns in Germany, France and… especially… Italy, where the so-called Green Pass is, to some, assuming many of the powers and perversions of the much-feared microchip in the back of the hand that is associated with the Devil.  (See Attachment Four)

“In Italy,” a young Neapolitan refusenik told the network, “many people are organizing peaceful demonstrations — people from all walks of life and economic backgrounds who care about everyone’s freedom, dignity and health — but they are labeled as conspiracy theorists.”

Officials in Deep Red Mississippi, of all places, who have issue an order to imprison vaxxing violators for five years.  (See Attachment Five)

And Phillippine President Rodrigo Duterte who threatened to order the arrest of Filipinos who refuse COVID-19 vaccination and told them to leave the country if they would not cooperate with efforts to end a public health emergency.  (NPR June 22, 2021)

Duterte, who is known for his public outbursts and brash rhetoric, said in televised remarks that he has become exasperated with people who refuse to get immunized amid a health crisis then help spread the coronavirus.

"Don't get me wrong. There is a crisis being faced in this country. There is a national emergency. If you don't want to get vaccinated, I'll have you arrested and I'll inject the vaccine in your butt," Duterte said.

"If you will not agree to be vaccinated, leave the Philippines. Go to India if you want or somewhere, to America," he said, adding (in a little touch of Texas tough) he would order village leaders to compile a list of defiant residents.

 

Short of confinement in state or Federal prisons, there is another remedy… an old one, well known to the populace of Daniel DeFoe’s day in the 17th century when the bubonic plague ravaged London.  That penalty is quarantine… either a mandatory house arrest, or confinement in some facility as differs, in some respects, from the prison system.

The case of one Mary Mallon more than a century ago, as described in a monograph by the Journal of Gastroenterology (See Attachment Six) is illustrative.  After an intensive investigation of typhoid cases in New York… including those in households where she had been employed as a cook… Mary was determined to be a carrier and locked up at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island in 1907.  (See a more detailed account of her travels, travails and tribulations in the Rhode Island Medical Journal, RIMJ, by Dr. Stanley Aronson… in Attachment Seven and a somewhat cinematic account of her pursuit by epidemiological detective George Soper in a pre-pandemic 2020 detective story in National Geographic, Attachment Eight.) 

(An action-adventure detective story, perhaps, the BBC reporting that, while the diligent Mr Soper proved to be Mary's nemesis – when he tracked her down, she chased him out of her kitchen with a carving fork!)

Mary was the first known asymptomatic carrier of a disease in the U.S, noted retired Judge Penny Clute in the Clinton County (Pennsylvania) Press-Republican last Christmas, as CV-19 was findings its legs.  Nothing persuaded Mary that she was dangerous. When she was first suspected of spreading typhoid in 1906, she had cooked in at least eight different households since 1900, and in seven of them the residents came down with typhoid fever. Twenty two in all, and one little girl died from it. This was also at a time when it was extremely rare for wealthy people to contract the disease. Yet “everywhere that Mary went” typhoid was sure to follow.

Released three years later after a change in the public health administration, and with the support of newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst (who, apparently, never tasted her tasty… and toxic… peach ice cream), she returned to work “where, at Sloane Maternity in Manhattan, she contaminated, in three months, at least 25 people, doctors, nurses and staff. Two of them died. She was returned, forthwith to North Brother Island where she remained until her death in 1938. (JoG)

“Soon after her first quarantine,” observed Trevor Hoppe, author of “Punishing Disease”, a 1908 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association labeled her “typhoid Mary”—a moniker that would live on in notoriety long after her death.

“The state’s pursuance and Mary’s stubbornness gave her an awkward place in the history of Medicine,” the authors of the monograph concluded.

Hoppe’s recently published book journeys back from Typhoid Mary to the plagues of Europe in the Middle Ages, and forward through the likes of tuberculosis, the Spanish Flu, and polio to the present-day Coronavirus, with a special emphasis on AIDS, a perfect storm of contagious disease and a despised minority population.  “As the billions of people around the global under shelter in place orders are discovering, public health has significant power to restrict our liberty in times of crisis. But what are the origins of that power? And how has it been used and abused historically?”

Abuse was particularly highlighted in the world’s reaction to the emergence of the HIV/AIDS pandemic which… originally and presently, in some corners of the globe… was deemed a plague spread by homosexuality.  Often, religious doctrine was justified as to the punishment of sinners until the inexplicable and troubling case of Ryan White provided an inkling that transmission was multifaceted – still, the weaponization of the disease to serve an anti-gay agenda compelled Hoppe to opine that “…public health measures have been enforced in deeply discriminatory ways for centuries, with the harshest, most coercive measures reserved for the most marginalized communities and people. It is in these historical moments that coercion becomes punitive.”

The initial chapter of “Punishing Disease”, published by the University of California Press is available online here.

Dr. Aronson (RIMJ) also remarked upon the historical linkage of communicable diseases and disfavored ethnic and socioeconomic classes, writing: “…nativist hostilities to the new immigrants, were translated readily to blanket accusations that the Irish were the cause of these outbreaks. These complaints ignored the fact that the Irish were the chief victims of these contagions, which had been spread exclusively by contaminated water supplies. The spread of poliomyelitis, between 1910 in 1920, was similarly blamed upon immigrant Italians and Jews.”

The National Geographic author, Nina Strochlic, also gave credit to Dr. S. Josephine Baker, an up-and-coming advocate of hygiene and public health and the first American woman to earn a doctorate in public health, who was dispatched to convince Mallon to provide samples, but was also chased away, necessitating the taking of the angry cook by force.  Perhaps anticipating the grip that conspiracy theories and loyalty to Trump have on many vaccine refuseniks, Baker later wrote: “It was Mary’s tragedy that she could not trust us.”

Trust will be at issue, of course, and inasmuch some of Biden’s Republican opponents and a shrinking (34 down to 17% at last polling) but still potent population of refuseniks wouldn’t trust him or the medical professionals or even the reformed sinners croaking out their regrets from their deathbeds if they swore on a stack of cardboard cartons of melting peach ice cream.

“Great numbers of people do not believe what public health physicians and others tell them about the extremely infectious virus COVID-19, and its transmission by asymptomatic carriers,” had declared Judge Clute, above. “Therefore, like Mary, they continue to endanger public health.”

We now already known that more than a few G.O.P. governors are vowing to obstruct, litigate and macerate any strong mask and vax mandates and, with the Supreme Court firmly in the hand of Trump-appointed justices, it would be necessary for the Congress to pass any more restrictive legislation.

And that will not be easy.  See immediate responses from CNN and Fox (Attachments Nine and Ten).

So let me close with this,” President Joe closed this afternoon.  “We’ve made so much progress during the past seven months of this pandemic. The recent increases in vaccinations in August already are having an impact in some states, where case counts are dropping in recent days. Even so, we remain at a critical moment, a critical time. We have the tools. Now we just have to finish the job with truth, with science, with confidence, and together as one nation.”  (Transcript, Attachment Eleven)

One might want to add justice and the American way, but the intent suffices.  Next – the details (and the courts and the Congress)!

But first, this week… the commemoration of Nine Eleven (as the Taliban/Isis/AlQaeda dance in Afghanistan grows more complicated), the prospect of domestic terror at the One Six memorial rally a week from Saturday and an old fashioned voters’ revolt and recall out in fiery Californ

Can we dare say… or even think it… Governor Caitlyn Jenner?

 

 

 

SEPTEMBER 2 – SEPTEMBER 8

 

 

Friday, September 3, 2021

 

Infected: 39,850,256

Dead:  647,549

Dow:  35,372.90

 

 

The ghost of Ida ravages the Northeast, 46 dead so far.  Fires break out because there is no water in hydrant. President Joe is touring New Orleans, promising relief and touting his infrastructure bill.  Nursing home patients evacuated and warehoused in… a warehouse.

    Joe’s poll numbers are down 6 point since the bungled Afghan evacuation.  Taliban jousts with ISIS and AlQaeda for power (see last week’s DJI) and perhaps the only member of ISIS-New Zealand kills six in stabbing rampage before police send him to Allah.

   Daily cases of plague up 984% since July 1st (see above).  The CDC says refuseniks are five times more likely to get it, 29 times more likely to require hospitalization.  Refuseniks give CDC the finger.  ΔV fourth wave sends fleeing sheeple back to the big box stores to buy and hoard toilet paper.

 

 

 

Saturday, September 4, 2021

 

Infected:  39,906,426

Dead:  648,106

 

           

 

Good weather news at last for fire fearful Westerners… moderating temperatures and occasional showers slow Lake Tahoe fire.  On the East Coast, authorities say that 11 of the 13 New Yorkers killed by Ida’s ghost flooding lived in illegal basement apartments.

   Turmoil in Texas – first week of school under masking de-mandates and vaccine refusal finds 20,000 students and 7,500 teachers get it.  Abortions grind to a stop (although the rich can still go to other states… for now… as three more other states join in in introducing similar Roe v. Wade cancel legislation.  Right-to-life advocates urge patriots to unite and form committees of vigilance to hunt down and lock up anybody who supports R v. W.  Democrats call this “inhumane”.  Republicans vow to “press forward” (presumably to outlawing contraception).

 

 

 

Sunday, September 5, 2021

 

Infected:  39,973,912                 Dead:  648,714

                

 

 

Weekend gun fun claims four (including a baby) killed by ex-Marine sharpshooter in Florida.  Five shot (3 killed) in DC, five more in Chicago (the weekend toll will reach six kids in twelve hours there).  South Carolina lawyer shot weeks after his wife and son are murdered.  Disgruntlement suspected.

   Ida’s ghost and Ida’s aftermath: 500,000 still without power in Louisiana as stifling heat settles in and gas for escape vehicles and generators is harder and harder to find (at any price).  Gas line cutters are being shot. 

   Gassings and beatings are plentiful, however, for women protesting Taliban takeover of Afghanistan.  They cancel all flights out with Americans still aboard and demand ransom payments (they want “recognition”).  Four Americans do make perilous overland journey to safety (sort of) in an unnamed bordering country.

 

 

 

 

Monday, September 6, 2021

 

Infected:  40,052,179

Dead:  649,271                            Dow:    No Dow, Labor Day

               

 

It’s Labor Day!  Governments celebrate by cutting off four varieties of unemployment benefits – three million lose some, nine million lose all.  Liberals say the problem is low wages and lack of childcare as schools reopen; conservatives call the complainers “bums” and tell them to go out and get a job.

   Plague gotcha toll tops 40M (U.S.) and doctors are in high dudgeon.  Don Jones warned that backyard barbecues with a few friends, college and NFL games in stadiums packed with refuseniks.  Dr. Jah says that kids going back to school need “better” masks.  Dr. Fauci touts 9/20 rollout for Pfizer boosters, later for Moderna and much later for J&J.  TV Dr. Peter Hotez says “the South is on fire” (with plague) and refuseniks and their adolescent kids are “defiant” and “something needs to be done about that.”  (See above)

   Not on fire – most homes in Lake Tahoe and evacuees are returning to a new danger… insolent and hungry bears have taken over the streets and alleys, breaking into homes and dumpsters and city parks in search of pick-i-nik baskets.

 

 

 

Tuesday, September 7, 2021

Infected: 40,280,001                    Dead:  650,511

Dow:  35,100.00

 

 

It’s National Beer Day.  Raise a big Texas T to Justice Kavanaugh and the other four pro-snitch, anti-abortion, pro-gun and anti-vote justices.

   Chug a few, then back to work and back to school (although 1,400 schools in 35 states are shut down due to the plague).  “We’ve got to get the FDA moving on vaccines for kids,” scowls Doctor Jha, not continuing to be tied up by bureaucracy.  Zip tie mob leader in school storming arrested for assaulting the school principal for mask mandate and vaxxing demand-date.

   9/11 “mastermind” Khalid Shiekh Muhammed will… finally, after twenty years… be hauled out of Gitmo and put on trial along with various subordinates.  Lawyers worry that his confession, after a reported 180 waterboardings, might be called into question.  The K-Man, not visibly worse for wear, seems to have dyed his long beard red.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Infected: 40,456,711

Dead:  652,657

Dow:  35,031.07

 

Texas Governor Abbott defends his prohibition of abortion for rape and incest, declaring that he, alone, can put an end to rape – not by legalizing it, but by putting on his cape (no mask, of course) and roaming the streets, snatching and terminating rapists.  This draws a response from Socialist scold AOC who asserts most rapists “are not predators walking about at night” but domestic abusers.

   President Joe, on his Ida Ghost tour, blames the disasters on climate change and promises that his two infrastsructure bills will solve the problem.  Other Joe (Manchin, swingvote of West Virginia) says he can support only 1T of Biden’s 3.5T “human infrastructure” component, probably dooming both.

   “Dancing With the Stars” 2021 cast announced… full of actors and athletes, of course, most notable names are gymnast Suni Lee, former Spice Girl Sporty, Covid widow (of actor Nick Cordero) Amanda Kloots and convict Lori Loughlin’s daughter, Olivia Jade.

 

 

Thursday, September 9, 2021

 Infected:  40,601,792

 Dead:  654,583

 Dow:  34,879.38

  

 

 

President Joe uncorks his six-point P.P.P. to put an end to the plague (see above).  Los Angeles imposes vaxxing mandate for kids 12 and over or school’s out.  Police spokesman says more cops killed by Covid than by criminals.  Refuseniks double down – Gov. Kristi Noe (R-SD) tells Joe “see you in court”, 13 unvaxxed Miami teachers die, Tennessee school board mob mugs pro-vaxxing student speaker and, oh yeah, flu season is just around the corner.

   Taliban allows one plane with 200 passengers and as many as 30 Americans to leave Afghanisan for Qatar.  Feds and local authorities prepare for more terrorism with 9/11 anniversary, California recall election Tuesday and pro-Capitol riot Super Spreader rally a week from tomorrow.

   Teenage gunslingers spray house with 150 rounds, kill sleeping 3 year old.  Shot lawyer in South Carolina disbarred for stealing from his firm… the PMPED attorneys… and cruel criminals steal identities of Surfside building collapse victims to go on shopping sprees.

 

 

 

 

 

After last week’s employment-related gains, this week’s Don sort of dithered and quacked, finally settling a little bit lower after the Dow posted losses blamed on inflation.  Been to the gas station, a new or used car lot, the grocery store or any big box emporium pricing Christmas gifts a little earlier than usual lately?

 

 

THE DON JONES INDEX

 

CHART of CATEGORIES w/VALUE ADDED to EQUAL BASELINE of 15,000

 

(REFLECTING… approximately… DOW JONES INDEX of June 27, 2013)

 

See a further explanation of categories here

 

ECONOMIC INDICES (60%)

 

 

DON JONES’ PERSONAL ECONOMIC INDEX

 

(45% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CATEGORY

VALUE

BASE

RESULTS

SCORE

SCORE

OUR SOURCES and COMENTS

INCOME

24%

6/17/13

LAST

CHANGE

NEXT

 9/3/21

 9/10/21

SOURCE 

Wages (hourly, per capita)

9%

1350 points

 9/3/21

   +0.50%

 9/17/21

1,462.32

1,469.68

https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/wages  23.83 23.95

Median Income (yearly)

4%

600

 9/3/21

  +0.03%

 9/17/21

673.47

673.68

http://www.usdebtclock.org/   35,622 633

*Unempl. (BLS – in millions

4%

600

 9/3/21

   -3.85%

 9/17/21

386.04

386.04

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS140000005.2%

*Official (DC – in millions)

2%

300

 9/3/21

   -0.14%

 9/17/21

451.28

451.91

http://www.usdebtclock.org/      8,654 642

*Unofficl. (DC – in millions)

2%

300

 9/3/21

   -0.03%

 9/17/21

374.61

374.73

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    15,467 462

Workforce Participtn.

     Number  

     Percent

2%

300

9/3/21

 

 +0.034%

 +0.006%

 9/17/21

 

318.07

 

318.05

In 152,861 913 Out 100,106 102 Total: 253,015

 

http://www.usdebtclock.org/ 60.44

WP %  (ycharts)*

1%

150

 9/3/21

  +0.16%

 9/17/21

152.48

152.48

https://ycharts.com/indicators/labor_force_participation_rate  61.70 nc

OUTGO

(15%)

Total Inflation

7%

1050

 9/3/21

+0.5%

 9/17/21

980.21

980.21

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.5

Food

2%

300

 9/3/21

+0.7%

 9/17/21

276.14

276.14

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.7

Gasoline

2%

300

 9/3/21

+2.4%

 9/17/21

262.35

262.35

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +2.4

Medical Costs

2%

300

 9/3/21

+0.3%

 9/17/21

286.20

286.20

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.3

Shelter

2%

300

 9/3/21

+0.4%

 9/17/21

288.77

288.77

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm     +0.4

WEALTH

(6%)

 

Dow Jones Index

2%

300

 9/3/21

  -1.59%

 9/17/21

384.83

378.70

https://www.wsj.com/market-data/quotes/index/DJIA 34,879.38 inflation blamed

Home (Sales) 

   (Valuation)

1%

1%

150

150

 5/21/21

 +2.22%

  -0.94%

 9/17/21

174.07

181.13             

174.07

181.13             

https://www.nar.realtor/research-and-statistics

     Sales (M):  5.99  Valuations (K):  359.9

Debt (Personal)

2%

300

 9/3/21

 +0.09%

 9/17/21

271.17

270.93

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    64,993 5,050

 

AMERICAN ECONOMIC INDEX (15% of TOTAL INDEX POINTS) 

NATIONAL

(10%)

 

Revenue (trilns.)

2%

300

 9/3/21

+0.26%

 9/17/21

328.81       

329.67       

debtclock.org/       3,845 855

Expenditures (tr.)

2%

300

 9/3/21

+0.13%

 9/17/21

215.66

215.38

debtclock.org/       6,947 956

National Debt tr.)

3%

450

 9/3/21

+0.11%

 9/17/21

320.50

320.15

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    28,714 745

Aggregate Debt (tr.)

3%

450

 9/3/21

+0.11%

 9/17/21

368.27

367.85

http://www.usdebtclock.org/    85,859 957

GLOBAL

(5%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Debt (tr.)

2%

300

 9/3/21

 +0.04%

 9/17/21

290.43           

290.31          

http://www.usdebtclock.org/   7,229 232

Exports (in billions)

1%

150

 9/3/21

 +2.46%

 9/17/21

 189.01

 189.01

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/index.html  212.8

Imports (bl.)

1%

150

 9/3/21

 - 0.18%

 9/17/21

 116.36

 116.36

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/index.html  282.9

Trade Deficit (bl.)

1%

150

 9/3/21

 +9.55%

 9/17/21

100.06            

 100.06            

https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/index.html   69.1

 

SOCIAL INDICES (40%) 

 

ACTS of MAN

(12%)

World Affairs

3%

450

9/3/21

    +0.2

 9/17/21

382.88

383.65

Four Americans finish overland escape from Afghanistan where Taliban sets up their government: no women but plenty of Al Qaeda fugitives with bounties on their heads of up to five million.  Aluminum Can shortage due to coup in Guinea causes Coca Cola panic in UK.  Reclusive NoKo prez Kim appears in public for the first time in weeks and… he’s lost weight!  Looks buff!  Ready to fire off more nukes!

Terrorism

2%

300

9/3/21

    +0.1

 9/17/21

220.52

220.74

President Joe goes on ghost-of-Ida death tour of New Orleans and New Jersey, promises to declassify documents in re: Nine Eleven on its twentieth anniversary.  Saudis are sweating.  Terrorists on trial for Nine Eleven anniversary: Khalid Shiekh Mohammed (U.S), lone coward who threw off his suicide vest after Bataclan massacre (France). 

Politics

3%

450

9/3/21

    -0.2%

 9/17/21

435.98      

435.11      

Liberal celebrities swarm California to support Gavin Newsom in recall next Tuesday, 46 candidates include – Gov. Caitlin Jenner?  GA Senate candidate Herschel Walker accused of stalking ex-girlfriend two decades ago and is promptly endorsed by Djonald Unbowed, who declares 2024 campaign and will hold rally at GA State Fair on 9/25, a week after pro-riot MAGgots return to the Capitol on 18th.  And don’t look now, but America goes broke next month,

Economics

3%

450

9/3/21

    -0.2%

 9/17/21

407.51

406.69

Childcare centers that went broke during plague now in short supply for back-to-workers.  Amazon’s Whole Foods turning to do-it-yourself checkouts (on the premise that liberals are honest).  Texas labor shortage prompts restaurants to “hire” robot servers.  Cars in short supply as Ford and GM shut down for lack of computer chips.  Joe (swingvote) Manchin calls for a “pause” on Joe’s 2 budget bills.

Crime

1%

150

9/3/21

     -0.2%

 9/17/21

240.90

240.42

South Carolina lawyer shot weeks after wife and son are murdered.  Six kids shot over twelve hours in Chicago.

 

ACTS of GOD

 

(6%)

 

Environment/Weather

3%

450

 9/3/21

      -0.1%

 9/17/21

402.06

401.66

Flabby Mindy waddles ashore on Florida panhandle, drops five inches of rain and waddles away; Larry, strong but misdirected, just raises some surf.  More thunderstorms and flooding for the Gulf all week, Northeast dries out for Labor Day, then the storms return.  Search for the missing of Ida’s ghost centers upon New Orleans nursing homes and Northeast basement apartments.

Natural/Unnatural Disaster

3%

450

 9/3/21

     -0.1%

 9/17/21

401.15

400.75

Rescuers save three year old boy after three days in the Australian bush but can’t save six year old girl killed at Colorado’s “Haunted Mine” amusement park.  Acapulco hit by 7.0 EQ, but only one fatality.  41 die in Indonesian prison fire.  Lake Tahoe evacuations – fire moving in, people move out, bears move in.  Fire goes away, people come back, bears disgruntled.  On the hexapods of murder hornets come pretty (but crop destroying) lanternflies.  Government recommendation – “if you see one, squish it.”

 

LIFESTYLE/JUSTICE INDEX   (15%)

 

Science, Tech, Education

4%

600

 9/3/21

-0.1%

 9/17/21

680.70

680.02

Jeff Bezos invests in Fountain-of-Youth immortality tech while FAA grounds rival Virgin Galactic for veering off course for two minutes during ego flight.  Back to School – and TV Dr. Jah wishes unvaxxed kids had “better” masks.  Any mask or vaxx Refuseniks fewer but crazier; school officials attacked on the job and at homes, principal escapes POThead vigilante mob with their zip ties.

Equality (econ/social)

4%

600

 9/3/21

    -0.1 %

 9/17/21

557.63

557.07

Human Rights Campaign fires President for having something or other to do with Andrew Cuomo at sometime or other.  White Chicago cop detains Chicago woman for “dogwalking while black”.

Health

     

           

            Plague

4%

600

 9/3/21

    nc

 

    

 

 

 -0.1%

 

 9/17/21

494.24

 

 

 

 

- 103.02

494.24

 

 

 

 

- 103.12

Author Wendy Suzuki writes “Good Anxiety” saying that “fight or flight” response to stress aids evolution.  Defective metal petfood bowls recalled for shredding canine and pussy teeth.

 

WashPost Poll says vaxx “hesitancy” drops from 32 to 17% under a barrage of bribes and threats.  W.H.O. virtuecrat commands Americans to refuse boosters out of pity for poor, unvaxxed nations.  Dr. Fauci predicts September 20th rollout for Pfizer booster on schedule, Moderna later, J&J much later, also calls crowded football stadiums full of screaming refuseniks not “smart”, while Mu variant is “suppressed” by Delta.   Dr. Jha “assures” world that variants like Mu (Colombia) and Lambda (from Peru) will be followed by more “as long as there is a pandemic” and gabby Dr. Peter Hotez predicts a “shift” in the plague while displaying a copy of “Manson’s Tropical Diseases”.  (Helta, skelta Delta indeed!)

Freedom and Justice

3%

450

 9/3/21

  +0.1

 9/17/21

459.57

460.03

Corporations mandate “tattleware” surveillance tech (like “Sneaker” ™ surveillance cameras) on work-at-home microserfs.  Theranos fraudster Elizabeth Holmes’ trial begins, creepy Cardinal McCarrick (91) also goes on trial for altar boy abuse.  Q-Anon “Shaman” Jacob Chansley pleads guilty, faces 4 years, next Saturday’s pro-riot rally calls insurgents “political prisoners”.   Ethel Kennedy clocks in as opposed to parole for Sirhan Sirhan.

 

MISCELLANEOUS and TRANSIENT INDEX           (7%)

 

Cultural incidents

3%

450

 9/3/21

-0.2%

 9/17/21

 527.75

 526.69

Britney’s mean daddy abandons his conservatorship.  “Shang Chi” has strong b.o. and Broadway reopening with 2019 hit “Hades Town” (not Washington) For sale: Elvis 1972 concert jumpsuit ($375K) and cape (only $50K).  Derek Jeter inducted into MLB Hall of Fame with only  one dissenting vote.  Coco Gauff and Naomi Osaka lose at US Open.  Trolls flood losers and winners with curses, insults and threats.  Soccer player Jean-Pierre Adams dies after 39 years in coma.  Also RIP: Actor Mikes Willians (”The Wire”) and Constantine (My Big Fat Greek Wedding), Weatherman Willard Scott, legacy politician Adlai Stevenson III.   Also media-ignored Euros: Greek composer Mikos (the zithering “Zorba”) Theodorakis and French actor Jean-Paul (“Breathless”) Belmondo.   

Miscellaneous incidents

4%

450

 9/3/21

    nc

 9/17/21

 485.00

 485.00

Gas crunch and airport flooding make for holiday travel nightmares.  Stunt pilot flies plane through two Turkish tunnels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Don Jones Index for the week of September 3rd through September 9, 2021 was DOWN 3.53 points.

 

The Don Jones Index is sponsored by the Coalition for a New Consensus: retired Congressman and Independent Presidential candidate Jack “Catfish” Parnell, Chairman; Brian Doohan, Administrator.  The CNC denies, emphatically, allegations that the organization, as well as any of its officers (including former Congressman Parnell, environmentalist/America-Firster Austin Tillerman and cosmetics CEO Rayna Finch) and references to Parnell’s works, “Entropy and Renaissance” and “The Coming Kill-Off” are fictitious or, at best, mere pawns in the web-serial “Black Helicopters” – and promise swift, effective legal action against parties promulgating this and/or other such slanders.

Comments, complaints, donations (especially SUPERPAC donations) always welcome at feedme@generisis.com or: speak@donjonesindex.com

 

ATTACHMENT ONE – 2021 infections and deaths

From Johns Hopkins University

Compiled by DJI

 

Infections

New Infect.

Deaths

New Deaths

Dow

Don

 

January 1, 2021

20,128,359

347,202

30,606.48

13,930.44

 

January 8, 2021

21,861,248

1,732,889

368,013

20,811

30,991.47

13,922.36                                   

 

January 15, 2021

23,520,561

1,659,353

387,986

20,775

31,097.97

13,839.52                                   

 

January 22, 2021

24,771,973

1,251,412

413,059

25,073

31,176.01

13,839.03                                   

 

January 29, 2021

25,923,041

1,161,068

435,765

22,706

30,603.36

13,832.16

 

February 5

26,691,738

768,697

455,881

20,116

31,148.24

13,847.97                                   

 

February 12

27,392,512

700,774

475,444

19,563

30,982.22

13,841.94                                      

 

February 19

28,003,315

610,803

495,693

20,259

31,493.34

13,833.35                                 

 

February 26

28,488,166

484,851

510,458

14,765

31,402.01

13,820.84

 

March 5

28,889,907

401,741

522,761

12,303

30,924.14

13,926.57                                

 

March 12

29,343,690

453,783

530,821

8,060

32,640.11

13,932.67                                   

 

March 19

29,726,580

482,890

541,143

10,322

32,862.80

13,930.56                                   

 

March 26

30,141,124

414,544

547,463

6,320

32,618.48

13,913.34                                   

 

April 2

30,608,366

467,242

554,074

6,611

33,101.48

13,913.18                                   

 

April 9

30,922,586

314,220

559,116

5,042

33,503.39

14,225.39                                   

 

April 16

31,495,649

573,063

565,289

6,173

34,035.99

14,206.98

 

April 23

31,992,407

497,758

571,200

5,911

33,815.90

14,210.58

 

April 30

32,274,941

282,534

575,193

3,997

32,862.30

14,210.23

 

May 7

32,345,062

70,121

575,921

728

34,548.43

14,234.68

 

May 14

Disk Stolen by common thief – data hacked and destroyed… perhaps deliberately, perhaps not.

 

May 21

32,894,616

549,554 (2)

585,225

9,304 (2)

34,021.55

14,204.82

 

May 28

33,085,106

190,590

589,223

3,998

34,548.43

14,210.59

 

June 4

33,246,635 

138,471

594,087

4,864

34,464.64

14,204.48

 

June 11

33,362,535

115,900

597,628

3,541

34,446.24

14,233.17

 

June 18

33,437,746

75,211

599,180

1,552

33,823.45

14,229.90

 

June 25

33,516,175

78,429

601,571

2,391

34,119.22

14,297.67  

 

July 2

33,603,148

93,027

603,527

1,956

34,633.53

14,304.62  

 

July 9

33,709,131

94,017

605,524

1,997

34,421.93

14,282.15

 

July 16

33,831,389

122,258

606,888

1,364

34,963.45

14,282.28

 

July 23

34,067,699

136,310

608,882

1,994

34,823.35

14,307.39

 

July 30

34,945,408

877,709

613,013

4,131

35,084.53

14,281.79 

 

August 6

35,695,469

750,061

616,493

3,480

35,064.25

14,296.17 

 

August 13

36,597,564

902,095

621,016

4,523

35,499.85

14,288.94 

 

August 20

37,613,822

1,006,258

627,844

6,828

35,064.25

14,285.60 

 

August 27

38,707,475

1,097,653

636,720

8,876

35,213.12

14,280.33 

 

September 3

39,850,256

1,142,781

647,549

10,829

35,443.86

14,361.00 

 

September 10

40,601,792

 

751,536

654,583

7,034

34,879.38

14,357.47 

 

September 11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENT TWO – From an Atlantic podcast (excerpted)

 

Moderator: Julia Longoria.  Guests: Pastor Robin Lutjohann, who today leads the church that Jacobson founded, originally a haven for Swedish immigrants, law professor Wendy Parmet and Willrich.

WillrichThere was pretty good reason. Public-health departments would send out teams of vaccinators—very often in the middle of the night—into tenement districts usually inhabited by, you know, immigrant, working-class people. They go door-to-door on these sort of vaccine raids, and they’d inspect the arms of everyone who lived in these homes to see that they had been recently vaccinated, that they had a kind of vaccine scar on their upper arms. In his own community of Cambridge, people are jumping out of windows and running the other way, or are getting doctors to sign phony vaccination certificates. I found one episode in the historical record from Kentucky, where the vaccinators went into an African American neighborhood of this community, and ordered everybody to get vaccinated, and those who refused were handcuffed and vaccinated at gunpoint.  

Longoria: (Quietly.) Wow.

WillrichThere was outright violence used to compel people to be vaccinated, and Jacobson certainly would have been aware of that.

Longoria: (Lightly.) I mean, call me an anti-vaxxer, but that sounds really extreme.

Willrich: It’s the very extreme edge of this.

Longoria: Though most Americans did accept vaccines at the time, this kind of forcible vaccination was part of the reason there was a healthy transatlantic anti-vaccination movement already in motion.

WillrichEvery local community of any significant size might have an anti-vaccination league or society. Typically they’d form during an epidemic or during some period when compulsion was on the rise. They’d meet in small meeting places. They would publish leaflets that they’d circulate on the city streets.

Longoria: Jacobson attended at least one anti-vax meeting, but he wasn’t officially part of the movement. All he did was, for himself, refuse to get vaccinated.

WillrichThis sort of set this chain of events in motion in which he ended up being brought before a local criminal court, and the charge was “the crime of refusing vaccination.”

Longoria: Eventually, a team of lawyers took on Jacobson’s case and fought it in court.

Jacobson was found guilty and appealed all the way up to the Supreme Court, where he was again found guilty and forced to pay a fine of five dollars.

 

Longoria: To help us understand Jacobson, the case, we called law professor Wendy Parmet.

ParmetOne of my strange pandemic outings over the summer was in search of the graveyard of one of Jacobson’s lawyers.

Longoria: She lives in Boston, where she’s the director of Northeastern’s Center for Health Policy and Law.

ParmetI think I found what is his tombstone only a few miles away from my house.

Longoria: (Surprised.) Really?

ParmetAnd I went “Wow!” And then went, you know, Nobody else knows what the hell I’m doing. (Both laugh heartily.) But it was something to do on a pandemic Saturday, right?

Longoria: She is completely obsessed with this case. Like, dedicated much of her career to understanding it.

ParmetJacobson, to me, is this incredibly rich case. It is so Delphic.

(A heavy, echoey, infrequent sound plays in the background.)

Longoria: Delphic, like—as in, like, a Greek oracle?

ParmetYeah, in the sense that different people read it differently because you can see in it what you want to see in it. And I think, as with many texts, we bring our own worldviews into what we see in Jacobson.  

(The music becomes more elaborate, percussive.)

Longoria: You can see this in the arguments that Jacobson’s lawyers made. They were all over the map, laying out almost like a menu of options for why someone might object to a vaccine.

WillrichThey sort of threw the whole constitutional kitchen sink at this case. They argued that vaccination was dangerous, that compulsion was unnecessary, that this was a violation of every individual’s right to make choices about their own bodies.  

Longoria: Religious ideas also made their way into some of their arguments.

(Music stops.)

ParmetThere’s a lot of religious terminology in the briefs. I don’t have the exact quote up. My computer went to bed. Can you give me one second to wake up my computer?

Longoria: Yeah, of course.

(Music starts.)

Parmet(Searchingly stretches out each syllable before “Okay.”) And I will find it. Okay. So this is from the brief before the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, filed on behalf of Jacobson, asked, quote, “Can the free citizen of Massachusetts, who is not yet a pagan nor an idolater, be compelled to undergo this rise and to participate in this new—no, revived form of worship of the sacred cow?”

Longoria: As in, vaccines are a worship of the sacred cow?

ParmetWell, there was this view … The word vaccine itself is from the Latin for “cow.”

Longoria: The word vaccine comes from vacca, or “cow.” Cows were a key part of the first vaccines ever made for smallpox.

WillrichA country doctor might keep a cow on hand for the purpose of producing vaccine.

Longoria: Scientists found that people who were exposed to cowpox from cows had immunity to smallpox.

WillrichSmallpox vaccine, as material, was live viruses taken from oozing sores on the bellies of calves.

Longoria: Vaccines and their precursors injected the material from boils.

(The music slowly distorts.)

Parmet… The pus … And put it under the skin of somebody who had not had smallpox. [A beat.] I’m probably telling you more than you want to know.

Longoria: That just, like, opened up a new room in my brain. I had no idea that it …

ParmetAnd you can find similar language in contemporary anti-vaccinationist websites. “It’s pagan. You’re putting something of the cow in you. You’re worshipping the cow in the revering of vaccination.”

Longoria: Wow.

ParmetThis fear and anger towards vaccination goes way back. This sense that it is somehow unnatural and ungodly goes way back.

Longoria: These are the arguments that Jacobson’s lawyers made to a judge. But the court struck all those arguments down. Jacobson lost his case at the local level—and then his lawyers appealed all the way to the Supreme Court.

(Wispy, ethereal music begins to play underneath the dialogue.)

Parmet: Jacobson is the first case where the Supreme Court took a claim of sovereignty over one’s body in terms of medical treatment seriously.

Longoria: This was one of the first times the Court was presented with this big question: Where do our rights over our bodies end, and our duty to the common good begin? And for Jacobson, the question was could he be fined for choosing his rights over his own body over his duty to the people of Massachusetts?

ParmetThe Court held that he could be.

Longoria: The Supreme Court said, “Yes, Jacobson. You have to pay the fine.”

WillrichThe Court’s decision was really pretty interesting.

Longoria: Historian Michael Willrich again.

(Music stops.)

WillrichThe opinion of the court was written by Justice John Marshall Harlan, who was a Civil War veteran. And for him, it was clear that this case was a legitimate exercise of the police power of the state. Smallpox was extremely dangerous, and he insisted that, by the same logic that a government can raise an army to prevent a military invasion and can compel individual citizens to take up arms and risk being shot down in the defense of their country, by that same sort of rationale, the government can fight off a deadly disease and demand individuals to be vaccinated, even if it violated their sense of personal liberty or conscience or whatever.

LutjohannWhen there is a virus or some other disease coming in, personal liberty has to take a back seat to public safety.

Longoria: Pastor Robin Lutjohann again.

LutjohannAnd this is a sticky and tricky thing to argue and to try to get right. And it turns out that he was on the losing side of history there.

(Soft, solemn piano music plays.)

Longoria: Since 1900, an estimated 300 million people in the world have died from smallpox. It was because of these mass vaccination campaigns that the very last known natural case of smallpox was recorded in 1977. It’s the first human disease to have been completely eradicated from the planet because of vaccines.

ParmetThere was this very short period—this wisp of history—where humanity thought we had conquered infection.

Longoria: After the smallpox outbreak that Jacobson lived through, and the influenza pandemic of 1918, there weren’t very many large epidemics in the U.S. until 60 years later, when we started to battle AIDS.

ParmetWe just sort of assumed that contagion was only the stuff of horror films and movies. It was behind us.

Once you recognize contagion’s ubiquity, you realize that so much of human history has been forged by battles over contagion. Contagion and epidemics have brought out the best in humanity and the worst in humanity. Contagions have been the excuse for so many atrocities in the world and so much discrimination. You know, plague came, and Jews were killed, and witches were burned. And we see this throughout history.

And so it’s a very delicate balance.

Longoria: Contagion brings out fear in all of us. In the times we’re living right now, it’s not hard to get inside of Henning Jacobson’s head when he refused the vaccine. He did it because he was scared.

(The piano music quietly slips off and ends.)

LutjohannI think I mentioned Henning Jacobson and his legacy in my sermon.

Longoria: Pastor Lutjohann has thought a lot about Jacobson’s fear. At the very beginning of coronavirus, when everything was just starting to shut down, he thought about what to say to his congregation. He didn’t want them to be afraid. And so he preached about a story in the Bible that he thought could help.

LutjohannIt was about how, like, there are these poisonous snakes.

Longoria: In the Book of Numbers, God sent down a plague of poisonous snakes on the people of Israel.

LutjohannThe disobedient people of God wandering through the desert are punished by God.

Longoria: And Moses—who was chosen by God to lead these people through the desert—watched as deadly snakes killed them, one by one. They were dying in droves, and people were terrified.

LutjohannAnd then Moses does this strange thing where he has a bronze snake made, and he puts it up on a pillar, and he displays it in front of everyone. And everybody who looks at the bronze snake on the pillar gets healed. So that’s the story.

Berbey: Okay.

LutjohannAnd there’s a number of different ways to interpret that.

Berbey: Yeah! I’m like, “What’s the message of that?” (Laughs.)

Lutjohann“What’s the message?” Right?  

(Lush, atmospheric electronic lounge music plays.)

LutjohannThe healing is going to come from the poison itself. How do the people bitten by the snake get healed? By looking at an image of the very snake.

I also mentioned to the congregation, you know, it’s also reminiscent of a very famous image that we see so often in medical sciences, which is also a serpent around the staff.

Berbey: Right.

LutjohannThis idea that somehow the deadly poison of the snake is also a way to unlock the possibility of healing. And it’s come true in modern vaccinations!

Most of the way we get vaccinations is by somehow altering the disease itself and, ironically, injecting the disease into a human being.

I mentioned Henning, and I said, “Look, this is not just true about medicine. This is true about a lot of our lives, you know? Do you want to overcome your deepest fears and your most profound hang-ups? Well, often it is by actually going to the root of where they come from and facing up to them, rather than running away from them.” You know, you can’t keep running away. You got to go back to where the disease started, and that’s where the key is.

Longoria: Jacobson’s case paved the way for governments to require vaccination for kids in schools. It’s been cited in New York and California recently to strike down people’s religious objections to vaccines.

Pastor Lutjohann is glad that Jacobson lost this case—even if it means he’s not sure where to put up that portrait of Jacobson in his church.

(Music fades out.)

LutjohannWe can be grateful for his work here.

Berbey: Yeah.

LutjohannAt the same time, also saying the dude was terribly mistaken—

Berbey: Yeah.

Lutjohann—about this one thing for which, unfortunately, he’s most famous now. And I think, in a way, maybe that’s beautiful, because it then means that we don’t get to make an idol of him. We don’t get to make this perfect, pristine founding father of him. You know, he was complicated!

(Fluttering, flitting electric-guitar chords play.)

Longoria: Henning Jacobson was complicated. And so is the legacy of his case. Twenty years after his case was decided, the government used the same argument that it used against Jacobson to make one of the darkest, most infamous decisions in U.S. history.

Longoria: Have you heard of Buck v. Bell?

LutjohannNo. [A beat.] Tell me about it.

Longoria: That, after the break.

(The music plays, quiets, then goes out.)

(Midroll.)

(Symphonic electronic music plays, then fades out.)

Longoria: Over the years, people keep reaching back into Henning Jacobson’s case, looking for answers—not just to vaccination questions, but to bigger questions about how much power the government should have over our bodies. And the line between liberty and duty to others is not always so easy to draw.

WillrichIt’s just an incredibly complicated legacy because, on the one hand, you want governments to be able to respond quickly and effectively in the public interest during a deadly epidemic. On the other hand, you want that to be carefully measured.

Longoria: Historian Michael Willrich again. The first time he read about the Jacobson case was actually as a footnote in a very different case.

WillrichI knew about this case because I had written an earlier book that dealt a lot with eugenics. And Jacobson, the case, was the only precedent cited by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1927 in the case of Buck v. Bell. Buck v. Bell is, you know, one of the sort of scariest U.S. Supreme Court decisions of all time.

(Distant music plays, humming on a loop like a skipping record.)

Longoria: At the center of Buck v. Bell is a woman named Carrie Buck. She was born in 1906, one year after the Supreme Court handed down Jacobson’s case.

Carrie was just 3 years old when her mom, Emma Buck, was institutionalized for being, quote, “feeble-minded” and “sexually promiscuous.” Her dad wasn’t in the picture, so officials put Carrie in foster care with a family called Dobbs.

She stayed with that family for 14 years until, one day, she learned that she was pregnant. She said the Dobbses’ nephew had raped her, but the family put her in an institution—the same one where her mom was.

The baby, Vivian, was born in 1924.

(A moment without narration—only music.)

Longoria: In that same year, Virginia passed a law that allowed the forced sterilization of people who were unfit, or, quote, “afflicted with hereditary forms of insanity that are recurrent.”

The institution where Carrie and Emma were living chose Carrie as the first one to be sterilized.

Carrie got a lawyer and took her case to the Supreme Court. The opinion was written by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.

ParmetOliver Wendell Holmes [Speaking haltingly.] writes an opinion that’s just very painful to read today. It’s a short, pithy, appalling opinion.

WillrichHe said that—you know, in the most famous line of that case—“three generations of imbeciles are enough.”

(The music fades out.)

Longoria: The court ruled that the state did have the power to sterilize Carrie Buck against her will.

ParmetIt’s—it’s just a horrific opinion. And his only citation in that case is Jacobson v. Massachusetts.

Longoria: Can you walk me through the logic there? How do you get from “Yes, the state can vaccinate you in a smallpox epidemic” to “You can sterilize a woman against her will”?

ParmetWell, it’s the dangerous far end of the idea that we need to sacrifice ourselves for the common good. This is a eugenicist opinion. And it assumes that her children would be equally “degenerate,” equally “impaired mentally.” To be clear, none of this was true. None of this was true about her.

To Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes’s point of view, Jacobson stands for the proposition that people need to sacrifice their individual—you know, we all need to give up something for the common good. He talks about how the best people are conscripted into the army to fight for the nation, and giving up your fallopian tubes is no big deal.

It’s the dangerous perversion of Jacobson, and Jacobson’s calling to the common good and Jacobson’s invocation of the social contract.

Longoria: Pastor Lutjohann had always thought that Jacobson was wrong to refuse the vaccine, and that the Supreme Court was right. But he did not know about this part of Jacobson’s legacy.

LutjohannTell me about it.

Longoria: So, Jacobson’s case was cited in this ruling. Basically, it said that there was a state interest in … cutting fallopian tubes of someone …

LutjohannOh, yeah. I did hear about this. Yeah. Forced sterilization of—

Longoria: Exactly.

Lutjohann—people who had mental illnesses, or … ?

Longoria: Yeah. Can I read you a little excerpt from the Supreme Court ruling?

Lutjohann: Please.

Longoria: It says, “The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes.” And then it references Jacobson v. Massachusetts. And then the opinion goes on to say, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”

LutjohannOh my goodness. That’s heartbreaking.

Longoria: The—the case was used in one of the most infamous Supreme Court cases we’ve ever had.

 

ParmetOne of my strange pandemic outings over the summer was in search of the graveyard of one of Jacobson’s lawyers.

Longoria: She lives in Boston, where she’s the director of Northeastern’s Center for Health Policy and Law.

ParmetI think I found what is his tombstone only a few miles away from my house.

Longoria: (Surprised.) Really?

ParmetAnd I went “Wow!” And then went, you know, Nobody else knows what the hell I’m doing. (Both laugh heartily.) But it was something to do on a pandemic Saturday, right?

Longoria: She is completely obsessed with this case. Like, dedicated much of her career to understanding it.

ParmetJacobson, to me, is this incredibly rich case. It is so Delphic.

(A heavy, echoey, infrequent sound plays in the background.)

Longoria: Delphic, like—as in, like, a Greek oracle?

ParmetYeah, in the sense that different people read it differently because you can see in it what you want to see in it. And I think, as with many texts, we bring our own worldviews into what we see in Jacobson.  

(The music becomes more elaborate, percussive.)

Longoria: You can see this in the arguments that Jacobson’s lawyers made. They were all over the map, laying out almost like a menu of options for why someone might object to a vaccine.

WillrichThey sort of threw the whole constitutional kitchen sink at this case. They argued that vaccination was dangerous, that compulsion was unnecessary, that this was a violation of every individual’s right to make choices about their own bodies.  

Longoria: Religious ideas also made their way into some of their arguments.

(Music stops.)

ParmetThere’s a lot of religious terminology in the briefs. I don’t have the exact quote up. My computer went to bed. Can you give me one second to wake up my computer?

Longoria: Yeah, of course.

(Music starts.)

Parmet(Searchingly stretches out each syllable before “Okay.”) And I will find it. Okay. So this is from the brief before the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, filed on behalf of Jacobson, asked, quote, “Can the free citizen of Massachusetts, who is not yet a pagan nor an idolater, be compelled to undergo this rise and to participate in this new—no, revived form of worship of the sacred cow?”

Longoria: As in, vaccines are a worship of the sacred cow?

ParmetWell, there was this view … The word vaccine itself is from the Latin for “cow.”

Longoria: The word vaccine comes from vacca, or “cow.” Cows were a key part of the first vaccines ever made for smallpox.

WillrichA country doctor might keep a cow on hand for the purpose of producing vaccine.

Longoria: Scientists found that people who were exposed to cowpox from cows had immunity to smallpox.

WillrichSmallpox vaccine, as material, was live viruses taken from oozing sores on the bellies of calves.

Longoria: Vaccines and their precursors injected the material from boils.

(The music slowly distorts.)

Parmet… The pus … And put it under the skin of somebody who had not had smallpox. [A beat.] I’m probably telling you more than you want to know.

Longoria: That just, like, opened up a new room in my brain. I had no idea that it …

ParmetAnd you can find similar language in contemporary anti-vaccinationist websites. “It’s pagan. You’re putting something of the cow in you. You’re worshipping the cow in the revering of vaccination.”

Longoria: Wow.

ParmetThis fear and anger towards vaccination goes way back. This sense that it is somehow unnatural and ungodly goes way back.

 

ATTACHMENT THREE    From Verify        

VERIFY: YES, STATES CAN LEGALLY MANDATE A VACCINE, AND FINE OR JAIL YOU FOR REFUSING IT, BUT CONTEXT IS NEEDED

The Verify team looked into a viral post claiming that states have the authority to mandate a vaccination under a 1905 legal precedent.

 

Author: Evan Koslof   Published: 2:47 PM EDT September 10, 2020   Updated: 10:42 PM EDT September 10, 2020

Facebook Twitter

WASHINGTON — 

 

Question:

Do states have the authority to mandate vaccinations, and institute punishments for those who refuse, due to a 1905 legal decision, as claimed in viral posts?

Answer:

Technically, yes.

Legal experts confirmed for the Verify team that the 1905 Supreme Court decision, Jacobson V. Massachusetts, gives states the authority to not only mandate vaccinations but also institute punishments like fines or jail time. 

This legal decision made an exemption for people with possible adverse health reactions. Most states also offer exemptions for those with religious or philosophical objections. 

But our experts also emphasized that this type of enforcement method seems unlikely. 

Sources:

Lawrence Gostin, Georgetown University Professor; Director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law; Director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law

Peter H. Meyers, Professor of Law Emeritus at The George Washington University Law School

Jacobson V. Massachusetts, 1905

Process:

To find out whether the viral posts are accurate, The Verify team turned to two legal scholars in the D.C. area. Both Lawrence Gostin from Georgetown University and Peter Meyers from The George Washington University confirmed that the landmark 1905 Supreme Court decision remained a strong legal precedent. 

"I think that case is still good law," said Meyers. "Even though it’s like 100 years old.”

This case focused on a regulation put into law in Cambridge, Massachusetts back in 1902. This regulation required residents to get vaccinated for Smallpox, threatening a fine for those who refused. 

A man named Henning Jacobson refused the vaccine and was convicted and fined as a result. Jacobson took his fight against this regulation all the way to the Supreme Court. 

In a landmark decision, the court ruled that these mandatory vaccinations were allowed and that punishments such as fines and jail-time were appropriate. 

Gostin said that this decision, now 115 years old, has been validated numerous times. 

"States are empowered by the Constitution," he said. "To mandate vaccinations.”

"Legal, but unlikely"

Our experts emphasize that there is an important nuance to this story. 

This Supreme Court decision makes such a punishment legal, but that doesn't mean it's likely. 

"That’s not how we enforce vaccine laws these days,” said Meyers. "There are no criminal statutes in the states mandating children or adults get the flu vaccine for example."

According to Meyers, the more typical approach is for schools and workplaces to require a vaccine before a person may enter their facilities. Threatening jail-time or fines is less likely, our experts said. 

"States do have the power to compel vaccination," Gostin said. "The question is whether they should." 

Our experts also point out that there are some important exemptions. People who have a medical issue, like an allergy or a low immune system were explicitly exempted in that 1905 legal decision.

Gostin said that most states also have exemptions for people with religious or philosophical objections to vaccinations.

"It's not a constitutional requirement," he said. "States have these exemptions because they want to politically. They think it's the right thing to do."

So, what's the final verdict?

We can Verify that yes, states do have the authority to mandate vaccinations and enforce these mandates with fines or jail time. 

However, there are multiple important exemptions,

 

ATTACHMENT FOUR – From CNBC

 

 ‘BREAKING SOCIETY APART’: UNVACCINATED PEOPLE ARE ANGRY AS THEY FACE MORE COVID RESTRICTIONS

 

By Holly Ellyatt  PUBLISHED FRI, AUG 13 2021 4:11 AM EDTUPDATED FRI, AUG 13 202111:09 AM EDT

 

The divide between the vaccinated and unvaccinated when it comes to Covid is likely to become even deeper as time goes on.

An increasing number of restrictions on those yet to receive a Covid shot are being introduced in Europe and the U.S.

The ease or freedom to travel, work, socialize and engage in leisure activities is increasingly determined by one’s Covid vaccination status. Thousands of protesters took to the streets in Toulouse against France’s mandatory health pass on July 12th 2021. More than 234,000 people demonstrated across France against the pass which will be mandatory for entry to a wide array of public venues such as cafes, theaters, concerts hall, cinemas, shopping malls, public transportation, public swimming pools, and even hospitals unless there’s a critical situation.

The divide between the vaccinated and unvaccinated when it comes to Covid-19 is likely to become even deeper, with officials in the U.S. and Europe planning, or introducing, an increasing number of restrictions on people who haven’t gotten a Covid shot.

Almost all governments around the world have so far resisted making Covid vaccination mandatory for their citizens, although many have introduced forms of Covid vaccination certificates, passes or passports that allow the immunized bearer more freedoms and work opportunities than unvaccinated people.

Aspects of daily life are increasingly complicated for anyone who is not vaccinated against Covid, and there is a rising sense of anger and injustice among those who reject the vaccine.

Despite protests among groups against such moves, the freedom to travel, work, socialize and engage in leisure activities is increasingly determined by our Covid vaccination status.

Nationally the U.S. has ruled out making Covid vaccination mandatory, rejecting the concept of vaccination passports back in April due to concerns over privacy and citizens’ rights. But some states are moving toward more restrictions for unvaccinated people.

Covid vaccinations are now mandatory for New York City’s municipal workers, and from mid-September proof of inoculation will be required from employees and customers of indoor eateries, gyms and entertainment centers. Meanwhile, workers in health care facilities in California will be required to provide proof that they’ve been fully vaccinated against Covid from October. On Monday, the Pentagon said it plans to make Covid vaccination mandatory for military service members no later than mid-September.

France, Greece and the U.K. are among European countries mandating vaccinations for health professionals or home care staff. In China, some local governments have reportedly said students will not be allowed back to school in September unless their entire family is fully vaccinated. In Australia, some states in lockdown are allowing only vaccinated people back to work and have said restrictions will be lifted only when a majority of people are immunized.

A large number of European countries now require travelers to show they are fully vaccinated, provide proof of a negative Covid test, or show that they have recovered from a recent infection. Otherwise, they must quarantine.

“I ask all those who have been vaccinated to encourage their friends, acquaintances and family members to also get vaccinated,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Tuesday, shortly after new measures were announced in that country. “This is not only a protection for us, but also for others who cannot be vaccinated — children or people with previous illnesses.”

There are many individuals who are unhappy about the trend toward differentiating between the vaccinated and unvaccinated. Marco De Matteo, a young Neapolitan man who is a travel enthusiast, is angry about the situation in Italy where a “green pass” has been introduced, likening the situation to a “health and economic dictatorship.”

“Those in power are limiting, by law, individuals’ freedom and dignity,” he said. “The imposition of the green pass in the world of work, both in the public and in the private sector ... is breaking society apart,” he told CNBC.

The pass is a digital or paper certificate that shows if someone has received at least one shot of a vaccine, has tested negative or has recently recovered from the coronavirus. The pass is now needed for any Italian citizen to access indoor bars and restaurants, cinemas, museums or gyms and will soon be required for travel and some jobs, such as teachers. Those who refuse will be suspended.

De Matteo, and many others who are also concerned about encroachment on civil liberties, recognizes the need to protect the health of the community. But he says that for him “there are many doubts both about the nature of the virus and about the vaccine.” He also regrets negative stereotypes attributed to people that object to Covid vaccines.

“In Italy, many people are organizing peaceful demonstrations — people from all walks of life and economic backgrounds who care about everyone’s freedom, dignity and health — but they are labeled as conspiracy theorists,” he said.

Vaccine skepticism and outright anti-vaccination sentiment have become rife since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, coinciding with disinformation and misinformation on social media that can ultimately endanger lives. Clinical trialspeer-reviewed by international medical journals, have shown that vaccination reduces the spread of the virus and contributes to reducing deaths and severe illness.

Medical professionals, such as Dr. Scott Gottlieb, have repeatedly spoken of the benefits of vaccination. Gottlieb, a former Food and Drug Administration commissioner, also told CNBC last month that people who have previously been infected with the coronavirus would still benefit from receiving Covid vaccines.

French yoga teacher Amel Lamloum told CNBC back in January that she didn’t see the advantages of having the Covid vaccine, given her young age (30) and good health.

Speaking to CNBC again Thursday, Lamloum said she still had not received the vaccine and was even more reluctant to do so now, given what she saw as “blackmail” by the French government to do so.

“I really think society has changed and that there is no justice anymore,” she said, adding that she no longer trusted the government and had prepared herself to adjust how she lived.

“Many, many people will not get the vaccine, for sure, and we will have to live in a side society and we are ready for it, we are ready for everything.”

For millions of people who have been happy and willing to receive a Covid vaccine, the rollout of vaccination programs has offered protection against a highly transmissible virus. It’s also allowed a return to much-missed freedoms, from seeing loved-ones and socializing to shopping and traveling.

But others across the U.S. and Europe see vaccination programs with ambivalence or worse.

Some have been critical of the speed of Covid vaccine development, distrusting clinical data on the efficacy and long-term safety credentials of Covid vaccines. Others have questioned why they need a shot when Covid can be a mild or asymptomatic illness for many people, especially the young.

Public bodies like the World Health Organization have repeatedly reaffirmed the importance of vaccinating as many people as possible against Covid to curb the spread of the disease and allow a return to a normal societal functioning. Covid vaccines have been proven in extensive clinical trials involving hundreds of thousands of people to be safe and highly effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death.

What’s less certain for experts is how long immunity lasts and whether future Covid variants could undermine vaccine efficacy. Many governments are weighing up the merits of booster vaccines too but for now, the main priority is to encourage vaccine uptake among the completely unvaccinated.

Public confidence in vaccines, or the flipside of vaccine hesitancy, differs wildly from country to country and is often informed by the public’s trust in government and health care systems. France, for example, is renowned for a high rate of vaccine hesitancy, while vaccine uptake in the U.K. has traditionally been high.

One survey showed vaccine opposition highest in Russia, followed by the U.S., according to a global poll of 15 countries carried out by data intelligence company Morning Consult in July and August. With 43,054 interviews conducted in the U.S. alone, the percentage of people unwilling or uncertain about getting a Covid vaccine stood at 30%.

Young adults have a lower vaccine rate in every country that was tracked except in China, the poll also found, although that data could also reflect the speed and breadth of vaccination programs; some young adults are yet to be fully vaccinated in a number of countries polled.

Adults in the U.S. appear to be the most consistent when it comes to vaccine skepticism; the share of vaccine skeptics in the U.S. has remained at 30% for the past four weeks, Morning Consult said, and that share has only fallen by 4 percentage points since it began tracking in mid-April.

“Over that same time period, in the other 14 countries tracked, the share of skeptics has dropped by an average of 13 points, more than triple the decline in skepticism seen in the U.S.. No other country has seen a smaller decline,” Morning Consult noted.

The top reasons given for uncertainty over vaccines were concerns over side effects and worries that clinical trials had been conducted too fast.

Back in Europe, parts of the leisure sector are being affected directly by the new rules. In Belgium, for instance, some soccer clubs are opening separate spectator stands for those who are unvaccinated. In the U.K., only the fully vaccinated will soon be able to enter a nightclub.

A number of countries have gone further, introducing types of Covid vaccination “passes” or “passports” at the national level, prompting criticism from some quarters.

France has introduced a “health pass,” meaning that individuals have to prove they are fully vaccinated, recently tested negative, or have recently recovered from the virus if they want to access cafes, restaurants, cinemas, museums and theaters. The pass has proved controversial, stoking protests attracting thousands of people who say the pass restricts civil liberties.

Germany looks to be heading in a similar direction, aiming to encourage vaccine uptake by ending free, government-paid Covid tests while requiring anyone who’s not fully vaccinated (excluding children) to present a negative Covid test in order to access indoor spaces and events.

“Tests are therefore becoming a prerequisite, for example, for access to hospitals, old people’s and nursing homes, indoor catering, events and celebrations, but also for visits to the hairdresser or the cosmetic studio. The same applies to indoor sports or accommodation, for example in hotels and guest houses,” the government said on Tuesday.

 

ATTACHMENT FIVE    From NewsNation

 

MISSISSIPPI WARNS UP TO 5 YEARS IN JAIL FOR THOSE WHO REFUSE TO ISOLATE

 

By Tiffany Hudson Posted: AUG 23, 2021 / 10:11 AM CDT Updated: AUG 23, 2021 / 10:11 AM CDT

 

MISSISSIPPI (NewsNation Now)— Those who violate a COVID-19 quarantine could face five years in jail or a $5,000 fine as the state attempts to contain a delta variant-fueled COVID-19 spike.

The Mississippi State Health Department order requires anyone with a positive test must remain in residential isolation until their symptoms have cleared and they show no signs of fever.

“If a life-threatening disease is involved, failure or refusal to obey the lawful order of a health officer is a felony, punishable by a fine of up to $5,000.00 or imprisonment for up to five years or both (41-23-2),” the order reads.

A negative test result is not required to end isolation, but individuals must be fever-free for 24 hours and display improved symptoms.

Mississippi schools are required by this new order to exclude all faculty and students until isolation ends.

A copy of the order can be viewed here.  In summary:

All persons, including fully vaccinated individuals, infected with COVID-19 must remain in the home or other appropriate residential location for 10 days from onset of illness (or 10 days from the date of a positive test for those who are asymptomatic). A negative test for COVID-19 is not required to end isolation at the end of 10 days, but you must be fever free for at least 24 hours withimprovement of other symptoms. Mississippi K-12 schools are required to exclude all students and faculty diagnosed with COVID-19 from the school setting during the isolation period (as above).

The failure or refusal to obey the lawful order of a health officer is, at a minimum, a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of $500.00 (41-3-59) or imprisonment for six months or both. If a life-threatening disease is involved, failure or refusal to obey the lawful order of a health officer is a felony, punishable by a fine of up to $5,000.00 or imprisonment for up to five years or both (41-23-2).

This order applied to fully vaccinated individuals as well as the unvaccinated.

The Mississippi State Health Department passed a similar measure in August 2020, with even longer recommendations for at-home isolation. The previous order stipulated that anyone diagnosed with COVID-19 must immediately isolate at home for 14 days.

Friday, a single-day record of 5,048 new COVID-19 cases was reported in Mississippi according to the state’s department of health. The rise in cases is fueled by the delta variant, which has heavily impacted both the vaccinated and unvaccinated in the state and around the country.

NewsNation affiliate WREG contributed to this report

 

ATTACHMENT SIX    From the Journal of Gastroenterology

MARY MALLON (1869-1938) AND THE HISTORY OF TYPHOID FEVER

By Filio Marineli, Gregory Tsoucalas, Marianna Karamanou, and George Androutsos, Ann Gastroenterol. 2013; 26(2): 132–134.

 

Mary Mallon was born in Ireland in 1869 and emigrated to the United States in 1883 or 1884. She was engaged in 1906 as a cook by Charles Henry Warren, a wealthy New York banker, who rented a residence to Oyster Bay on the north coast of Long Island for the summer. From 27 August to 3 September, 6 of the 11 people present in the house were suffering from typhoid fever. At this time, typhoid fever was still fatal in 10% of cases and mainly affected deprived people from large cities [5,6].

The sanitary engineer, committed by the Warren family, George Sober, published the results of his investigation on the 15th of June 1907, in JAMA. Having believed initially that freshwater clams could be involved in these infections, he had hastily conducted his interrogation of the sick people and also of Mary who had presented a moderate form of typhoid [7]. Mary continued to host the bacteria, contaminating everything around her, a real threat for the surrounding environment. Although Sober initially feared that the soft clams were the culprits, this proved to be incorrect as not all of those stricken had eaten them. Finally Sober had solved the mystery and became the first author to describe a “healthy carrier” of Salmonella typhi in the United States. From March 1907, Sober started stalking Mary Mallon in Manhattan and he revealed that she was transmitting disease and death by her activity. His attempts to obtain samples of Mary’s feces, urine and blood, earned him nothing but being chased by her. Sober reconstituted the puzzle by discovering that previously the cook had served in 8 families. Seven of them had experienced cases of typhoid. Twenty-two people presented signs of infection and some died [5,6].

That year, about 3,000 New Yorkers had been infected by Salmonella typhi, and probably Mary was the main reason for the outbreak. Immunization against Salmonella typhi was not developed until 1911, and antibiotic treatment was not available until 1948 [4]. Thus, a dangerous source like Mary had to be restrained. Mary was then frequently accused of being the source of contact for hundreds of the ill. Sober, after enlisting the support of Dr. Biggs of the N.Y. Department of Health, persuaded Dr. Josephine Baker, who along with the police, was sent to bring Mary Mallon in for testing. Baker and the police were met by an uncooperative Mary, who eluded them for five hours. At the end she was forced to give samples. Mary’s stool was positive for Salmonella typhi and thus she was transferred to North Brother Island to Riverside Hospital, where she was quarantined in a cottage [5].

In 1909, Mary unsuccessfully sued the health department. During her two-year period of confinement, she had 120/163 stool samples test positive. No one ever attempted to explain to Mary the significance of being a “carrier”, instead they had offered to remove her gallbladder, something she had denied. She was unsuccessfully treated with Hexamethylenamin, laxatives, Urotropin, and brewer’s yeast. In 1910, a new health commissioner vowed to free Mary and assist her with finding suitable employment as a domestic but not as a cook. Mary was released but never intended to abide by the agreement. She started working again in the cuisines of her unsuspecting employers, threatening public health once more [4].

As a cook of Sloane Maternity in Manhattan, she contaminated, in three months, at least 25 people, doctors, nurses and staff. Two of them died. She had managed to be hired as “Mary Brown” [8]. Since then she was stigmatized as “Typhoid Mary” (Fig. 1) and she was the butt of jokes, cartoons, and eventually “Typhoid Mary” appeared in medical dictionaries, as a disease carrier. Mary was placed back on North Brother Island where she remained until her death. On Christmas morning, 1932, a man who came to deliver something to her found Mary on the floor of her bungalow, paralyzed. She had had a stroke of apoplexy and never walked again. Thereafter, for six years, she was taken care of in the “Riverside Hospital” (Fig. 2). She died in November 1938. Her body was hurried away and buried in a grave bought for the purpose at St. Raymond’s Cemetery in Bronx. A post mortem revealed that she shed Salmonella typhi bacteria from her gallstones raising the issue of what would have happened if she had accepted the proposed operation. Some other researchers insisted that there was no autopsy and that this was another urban legend, whispered by the Health Center of Oyster Bay, in order to calm ethical reactions [5].

CONCLUSION

 The history of Mary Mallon, declared “unclean” like a leper, may give us some moral lessons on how to protect the ill and how we can be protected from illness. Mary had refused the one operation which might have cured her. In later years she lost much of her bitterness and lived a fairly contented if necessarily restricted life. She evidently found consolation in her religion and she was then at perfect peace in the bosom of the church to which she gave the last years her faith and loyalty. By the time she died New York health officials had identified more than 400 other healthy carriers of Salmonella typhi, but no one else was forcibly confined or victimized as an “unwanted ill”. Mary Mallon is always a reference when mentioning the compliance of the laws concerning public health issues. The state’s pursuance and Mary’s stubbornness gave her an awkward place in the history of Medicine.

 

ATTACHMENT SEVENFrom rimj (rhode island medical journal)

 

THE CIVIL RIGHTS OF MARY MALLON

by STANLEY M. ARONSON, MD

 

No one disputes the events after August 1906; the facts prior to this date, however, remain conjectural. Gen. William Henry Warren, a prominent New York City banker, rented a summer house for his family of three in Oyster Bay, Long Island. In July 1906 they moved in, bringing with them a complement of seven live-in servants. On August 27, one of the servants became acutely ill with typhoid fever, and by September 3, five more cases of typhoid had arisen within the household, including the general’s wife and daughter. There were no further cases but the owner of the home, fearing that the value of her property was now in jeopardy, recruited an established epidemiologist and sanitarian, Dr. George A. Soper, to seek out the origins of the contagion. He quickly eliminated the usual sources of enteric fever (faulty privies, deteriorating sewer systems, contaminated water supply), leaving him with the uneasy likelihood that a healthy human might be the carrier of the pathogen. By bacteriologic assays, he eliminated from suspicion Mr. Warren and six of the seven servants. The seventh, a Mary Mallon, had quietly resigned her job as the family cook shortly after the first case of typhoid had emerged and had then disappeared. She was described by her fellow house servants as remote, unfriendly, at times violently hostile and a “rather dirty person.” Soper felt obliged to pursue his one remaining lead and he sought out a Mrs. Stricker whose employment agency in Manhattan had originally recruited Mary Mallon as the family cook.

Slowly and deliberately Soper reconstructed Mallon’s employment history as a family cook, going back many years. He then interviewed most of these families. Beginning in 1900 there had been a household in Mamaroneck, then several in Manhattan, then one in Maine, then Sands Point in Long Island, then Tuxedo Park, New York. In each instance, one or more individuals in the household had developed typhoid, and in each instance, Mallon was said to have discretely departed to seek employment elsewhere. In the seven households investigated, Soper identified 53 cases of acute typhoid fever (with three deaths), all temporarily associated with Mallon’s employment as cook. Soper readily admitted that these statistics were quite conservative since many of Mallon’s known places of previous employment could no longer be investigated and not all of her tours of duty had been obtained through the Stricker employment agency. Furthermore, Soper counted only those primary cases of typhoid ascribable to direct contact with Mallon’s food preparations while not considering the many secondary cases stemming from the momentum of the initial outbreaks. Soper fully acknowledged that the true number most likely exceeded 1,000. Armed with circumstantial evidence of a compelling association between Mallon’s cooking and multiple outbreaks of typhoid, Soper tracked her finally to a new sight of employment, confronted her with the epidemiologic data and requested her voluntary cooperation in verifying her carrier state. Mallon’s pathologic temper was amply demonstrated and he barely escaped her wrath. Undeterred however, he appealed to the New York Department of Health and eventually Mallon was arrested, but only after a violent struggle in which two policemen suffered injuries, one losing most of one ear.

Mallon was kept in an isolation ward at Willard Parker Hospital where she exhibited no ill health, but repeated stool cultures nevertheless demonstrated an abundance of S. Typhi. By order of the health authorities, she was then remanded to a small bungalow next to Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island in the East River. Her cottage was provided with all necessary amenities and she was free to roam the island and use its facilities, including the local chapel.

In 1908, G.F. O’Neill, a local attorney, took on her case as an instance of imprisonment without due process of law, without legal representation, indeed, without even a trial. The judge dismissed a request for release, pointing to a 1905 Supreme Court judgment regarding compulsory vaccination, which declared that prudent measures undertaken to protect the public were a legitimate exercise of the state police powers. By this time Mary Mallon’s story became widely publicized and the June 20, 1909 edition of William Randolph Hearst’s New York American vividly elaborated on the morbid events, labeling her as “…the most dangerous woman in America.” The newspaper also provided her with a new name: “Typhoid Mary.” In February 1910, after 35 months of isolation (during which time she repeatedly asserted her innocence claiming that her imprisonment was a British plot to suppress her activities (HERITAGE – RIMJ NOVEMBER 1995) Mary Mallon’s story became widely publicized and the June 20, 1909 edition of William Randolph Hearst’s New York American vividly elaborated on the morbid events, labeling her as “…the most dangerous woman in America.” The newspaper also provided her with a new name: “Typhoid Mary.” (74 75 EN HERITAGE – RIMJ NOVEMBER 1995 RIMJ ARCHIVES | MAY ISSUE WEBPAGE | RIMS MAY 2020 R H O D E I S L A N D M E D I C A L J O U R N A L 75 on behalf of Irish independence)

Mallon was offered her freedom on two conditions: that she refrain from any employment requiring direct contact with food and that she report to the Department of Health at three-month intervals. She was then released and promptly broke both promises, disappearing into the urban sprawl of municipal New York. For the next five years she held various cooking posts at numerous homes and in restaurants, under a number of aliases, producing a further series of typhoid fever outbreaks. In 1915, there was an unexplained cluster 20 cases of typhoid among the patients at the Sloane Hospital for Women. Soper was called, and he immediately recognized the chef as Mary Mallon, now under the assumed name of Brown. She was promptly remanded to the same East River cottage. Some 17 years later, on Christmas morning 1932, Mallon suffered a severe stroke, remaining in a semicomatose state for another six years, ultimately dying on November 11, 1938. In what some regarded as undue haste, she was buried in a Bronx cemetery within hours of her death.

These, then, are the accepted details in the tragic life of Mary Mallon. Civil liberties vs. population safety The New York Department of Health had been accused of abridging Mallon’s civil liberties; indeed, banishing her without trial to life imprisonment. Many claimed that a mere quirk of microbial happenstance, ultimately beyond her control, had somehow converted her into an unwilling chronic carrier. The department, on the other hand, pointed to as many attempts to work out some sort of compromise with Mallon; it insisted, nevertheless, that it could never abdicate its obligation to protect the health of the larger community. It claimed that all society represents an uneasy equilibrium between private autonomy and the needs of the community and that no system of government can prevail for long without some visible authority in matters of health and social stability. (Plato describes an important trial in Athens: “The judges: Tell us Socrates, do you suppose a city can exist and not be overthrown, in which the decisions of law are powerless, set aside and trampled upon by individuals?”)

The debate regarding the civil liberties of the innocent carrier may have obscured yet another area of contention. The arrival to the shores of some 36 million immigrants between 1880 and 1920 was greeted with varied emotions, particularly so since most newcomers were poor, under-educated and with a greater vulnerability to such infectious diseases as cholera, typhoid, tuberculosis and poliomyelitis. The waves of arriving Irish that, for example, coincided with major outbreaks of cholera and typhoid in East Coast cities, and nativist hostilities to the new immigrants, were translated readily to blanket accusations that the Irish were the cause of these outbreaks. These complaints ignored the fact that the Irish were the chief victims of these contagions, which had been spread exclusively by contaminated water supplies. The spread of poliomyelitis, between 1910 in 1920, was similarly blamed upon immigrant Italians and Jews. Newspaper reports invariably mentioned Mary Mallon’s Irishness, as well as her alleged temper, suggesting that a Celtic heritage and a confronting personality were somehow the necessary preludes to the carrier state. Epidemiologists, on the other hand, concluded that at least five percent of those exposed to the typhoid bacillus became chronic carriers, meaning that they were at least 20,000 carriers of all ages and persuasions wandering the streets and country roads of the United States in 1906. Yet only Mary Mallon’s name crops up as the evil exemplar of the carrier state. Some further observations need to be offered: without any help from carrier immigrants, typhoid fever had continued to flourish throughout the United States, including those heartland cities where few if any immigrants had ventured. Indeed, in the United States Army of 1898 to 1900 with approximately 107,000 officers and men, most of whom were native-born, there were 20,738 cases of typhoid, with 1,580 deaths. Even if all immigrants had somehow been excluded from this nation, typhoid would nevertheless have continued to exert its toll until American society could instill better personal hygiene habits in its residents and until local communities were sufficiently motivated to establish water supplies free of fecal contamination.

 

ATTACHMENT EIGHT  From nationalgeographic.com

 

TYPHOID MARY'S TRAGIC TALE EXPOSED THE HEALTH IMPACTS OF 'SUPER-SPREADERS'

Tracking down the culprit behind an outbreak of typhoid fever in 1900s New York was a breakthrough in how symptom-free carriers can spread sickness.

 

By Nina Strochlic   Published March 17, 2020

 

George Soper was not your typical detective. He was a civil engineer by training, but had become something of an expert in sanitation. So when, in 1906, a landlord in Long Island was struggling to trace the source of a typhoid outbreak, Soper was called in. The landlord had rented his Long Island house to a banker’s family and servants that summer. By late August, six of the house’s 11 inhabitants had fallen ill with typhoid fever.

Soper had been previously hired by New York state to investigate disease outbreaks—“I was called an epidemic fighter,” he later wrote—and believed that typhoid could be spread by one person serving as a carrier. In Long Island, he focused his attention on the cook, Mary Mallon, who had arrived three weeks before the first person became ill.

What Soper discovered would demonstrate how an unwitting carrier could be the root of disease outbreaks, and, later, spark a debate about personal autonomy when it’s pitted against public health.

Combing through the roster of wealthy New Yorkers who had employed Mallon in their summer homes between 1900 and 1907 he found a trail of 22 infected people. Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection typically spread through food and water contaminated by salmonella. Patients fall ill with high fever, diarrhea—and, before antibiotics were developed to treat it, sometimes delirium and death.

At that time, without regulated sanitation practices in place, the disease was fairly common and New York had battled multiple outbreaks. In 1906, the year Soper began his investigation, a reported 639 people had died of typhoid in New York. But never before had an outbreak been traced to a single carrier—and certainly not one without any symptoms themselves.

Soper learned that Mallon would often serve ice cream with fresh peaches on Sunday. Compared to her hot, cooked meals, he deduced that “no better way could be found for a cook to cleanse her hands of microbes and infect a family.”

Hunting the carrier

Four months after he started the investigation, Soper found Mallon working in a Park Avenue brownstone. The 37-year-old Irish cook, he later described, was “five feet six inches tall, a blond with clear blue eyes, a healthy color and a somewhat determined mouth and jaw.” When confronted with his evidence and a request for urine and feces samples, she surged at Soper with a carving fork.

Mallon (fourth from right) was quarantined with other inmates for more than a third of her life. It's likely that Mallon never fully understood how typhoid spread. In two separate outbreaks, she is estimated to have infected 51 people, three of whom died.

Dr. S. Josephine Baker, an up-and-coming advocate of hygiene and public health, was dispatched to convince Mallon to provide samples, but was also chased away. Baker, whose father had died of typhoid, later made it her mission to promote preventative medicine (and became the first woman to earn a doctorate in public health). “It was Mary’s tragedy that she could not trust us,” Baker later wrote.

Finally, Mallon was escorted by Baker and five policemen to a hospital where—after a nearly successful escape attempt—she tested positive as a carrier for Salmonella typhi, a bacteria that causes typhoid. This would later be confirmed by more tests. She was quarantined in a small house on the grounds of Riverside Hospital. The facility was isolated on North Brother Island, a tiny speck of land off the Bronx.

Mallon herself had no symptoms of typhoid and didn’t believe she could be spreading it. It’s likely Mallon never understood the meaning of being a carrier, particularly since she exhibited no symptoms herself. The only cure, doctors told Mallon, was to remove her gallbladder, which she refused. She was dubbed “Typhoid Mary” by the New York American in 1909 and the name stuck.

In a hand-written letter to her lawyer that June, Mallon complained. “I have been in fact a peep show for everybody. Even the interns had to come to see me and ask about the facts already known to the whole wide world. The tuberculosis men would say ‘There she is, the kidnapped woman,’” she wrote. “Dr. Park has had me illustrated in Chicago. I wonder how the said Dr. William H. Park would like to be insulted and put in the Journal and call him or his wife Typhoid William Park.”

In 1909, she sued the New York City Department of Health and the case was brought to the Supreme Court. In the court of public opinion, Mallon had stirred a debate over individual autonomy and the state’s responsibility in a public health crisis. In the court of law, her lawyer argued she had been imprisoned without due process.

The court declined to release her, saying “it must protect the community against a recurrence of spreading the disease,” but Mallon was freed early the following year by the city’s new health commissioner. He agreed on the condition that she stop cooking.

Without other skills and unconvinced that her condition was a danger, Mallon drifted back to her old job around New York and New Jersey. She prepared meals for a hotel, a Broadway restaurant, a spa, and a boarding house. When, in 1915, a typhoid outbreak sickened 25 people at Sloane Maternity Hospital, George Soper was again called to investigate. The cook, “Mrs. Brown,” was discovered to be Mallon.

A life in exile

Mallon was sent back to North Brother island—permanently. She spent her days reading and working in the laboratory preparing medical tests. She died there of a stroke in 1938, after a quarter-century of quarantine. She never admitted to being a carrier of typhoid, and perhaps without the education to understand it, actually never believed it. Nine people attended her funeral at St. Luke’s in the Bronx.

During the course of two outbreaks, at least 51 people caught typhoid through Mallon, and three died. The number of cases was probably much higher. “The story of Typhoid Mary indicates how difficult it is to teach infected people to guard against infecting others,“ Soper warned. But the authorities had already changed the way they responded to such threats. At the time of Mallon’s death, more than 400 healthy carriers of typhoid who had been identified by New York officials, and none had been forced into confinement.

The legacy of “Typhoid Mary” as an asymptomatic vessel for disease led to the theory of “superspreaders” that has surfaced in disease outbreaks ever since. “Since ‘Typhoid Mary’ was discovered, the whole problem of carriers in relation to infectious diseases has assumed an immense importance,” Soper said in a speech in 1913, “an importance which is recognized in every country where effective public health work is done and in every army where communicable disease has been brought under control.”

 

ATTACHMENT NINE – From CNN

 

BIDEN ANNOUNCES NEW VACCINE MANDATES THAT COULD COVER 100 MILLION AMERICANS

By Kevin Liptak and Kaitlan Collins,   Updated 9:01 PM ET, Thu September 9, 2021

 

 (CNN)President Joe Biden on Thursday imposed stringent new vaccine rules on federal workers, large employers and health care staff in a sweeping attempt to contain the latest surge of Covid-19.

The new requirements could apply to as many as 100 million Americans -- close to two-thirds of the American workforce -- and amount to Biden's strongest push yet to require vaccines for much of the country.

"We've been patient, but our patience is wearing thin, and your refusal has cost all of us," Biden said, his tone hardening toward Americans who still refuse to receive a vaccine despite ample evidence of their safety and full approval of one -- the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine -- from the US Food and Drug Administration.

He said vaccinated America was growing "frustrated" with the 80 million people who have not received shots and are fueling the spread of the virus. And he acknowledged the new steps would not provide a quick fix.

"While America is in much better shape than it was seven months ago when I took office, I need to tell you a second fact: We're in a tough stretch and it could last for awhile," Biden said in an early evening speech from the White House.

At the center of Biden's new plan is directing the Labor Department to require all businesses with 100 or more employees ensure their workers are either vaccinated or tested once a week, an expansive step the President took after consultation with administration health officials and lawyers. Companies could face thousands of dollars in fines per employee if they don't comply.

US Postal Service workers would fall under that rule, a senior administration official told CNN, and employees will be required to be vaccinated or face mandatory weekly testing. The Postal Service, a quasi independent agency, employees more than 640,000 people.

Biden also signed an executive order requiring all government employees be vaccinated against Covid-19, with no option of being regularly tested to opt out. The President signed an accompanying order directing the same standard be applied to employees of contractors who do business with the federal government.

He said 300,000 educators in federal Head Start programs must be vaccinated and called on governors to require vaccinations for schoolteachers and staff.

And Biden announced he would require the 17 million health care workers at facilities receiving funds from Medicare and Medicaid to be fully vaccinated, expanding the mandate to hospitals, home care facilities and dialysis centers around the country.

"We have the tools to combat the virus if we come together to use those tools," Biden said at the outset of what was billed as a major speech to tackle the latest phase of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The new rules amount to the most dramatic steps to date to get more Americans vaccinated. Once cautious of vaccine mandates, the Biden administration is now wholly embracing them as vaccine hesitancy persists among certain groups.

Administration officials acknowledged the requirement for large employers could be challenged in court. But they said their hope was to provide cover of federal rules to businesses who want to require vaccines for employees.

The new rules come as the Delta variant tears through communities across the country, causing upticks in hospitalizations and deaths particularly in areas where vaccination rates remain low.

A potentially massive impact on the US workforce

Wide swaths of the American workforce could be impacted by the new rules, which would take effect over the coming weeks. The new "emergency temporary standard" from the Labor Department will require large employers to give their workers paid time off to get vaccinated. If businesses don't comply, the government will "take enforcement actions," which could include "substantial fines up to nearly $14,000 per violation, according to officials.

Officials said the standard was a "minimum," and some companies may choose to go further, including by mandating the vaccine instead of offering a test-out alternative.

"Each employer will decide exactly what they want to do, but what we're saying through the Department of Labor rule making process is a minimum of testing once a week or full vaccination," a senior administration official said.

The new announcements move beyond what Biden announced earlier this summer, when he required federal workers be vaccinated but allowed for those who opted out to be subject to stringent mitigation measures. Now, federal employees will have 75 days to get vaccinated or risk being fired.

"The expectation is if you want to work in the federal government or want to be a contractor, you need to be vaccinated," press secretary Jen Psaki said, adding the number of unvaccinated federal workers was still being compiled. Officials said limited exemptions would apply to workers claiming medical or religious reasons for not getting vaccinated.

The White House has said the federal government should act as a model for other businesses in their own vaccine mandates, and has praised large companies that require employees to be vaccinated.

President takes other measures to tackle Delta

Biden on Thursday also announced a major expansion to free testing, a step public health officials have said is critical to containing the virus, particularly as children return to school and some workers return to offices.

The Defense Production Act, a wartime measure used to compel companies to manufacture essential supplies, will be evoked to accelerate the production of rapid tests and the administration is planning to send 25 million free tests to US health clinics, officials said. Some retailers, like Amazon, Kroger and Walmart, will sell the at-home tests at cost.

In addition, Biden called on large entertainment venues to require proof of vaccination or negative tests for patrons seeking entry. And he said the Transportation Safety Administration would double fines on passengers who refuse to wear masks on planes.

"If you break the rules, be prepared to pay — and by the way, show some respect," he said, chastising recent incidents of "air rage" directed toward hard-working cabin crews.

The six-pronged plan Biden unveiled was finalized by the President and members of his public health team on Wednesday afternoon. He received a briefing in the Oval Office from his Covid-19 response team on the anticipated new steps.

The six pillars of Biden's plan include: vaccinating the unvaccinated; further protecting the vaccinated through booster shots; keeping schools open; increasing testing and requiring masks; protecting the economic recovery; and improving care for those with Covid-19.

Biden's approval on handling of Covid is slipping

Officials said they hope the new approach will provide Americans a clearer view of how the pandemic will end after 18 months of Covid-dampened life. The White House has watched as the President's approval ratings on Covid have slipped, and feel part of the problem is the backward motion felt this summer: a spike in cases led to a return to masks and continued working from home.

An ABC News/Washington Post poll conducted at the end of August found 52% of respondents approve of how Biden is handling the pandemic, a 10-point drop from June. Still, more respondents said they approved of his handling of Covid than disapproved.

At the same time, Biden's overall approval has slipped into negative territory amid a chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan and the Delta variant's drag on the economic recovery. The President's aides view combating the pandemic as the single most important issue of his presidency, and the one that will determine his political fate.

This story has been updated with additional reporting and developments from Biden's speech.

CNN's Jeff Zeleny contributed to this report.

 

ATTACHMENT TEN – from Fox News

 

BIDEN DECLARES WAR ON DESANTIS AND ABBOTT: 'GET THEM OUT OF THE WAY'

Biden promised to use his powers as president to resist them

By Jon Brown |

 

President Biden condemned Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., Greg Abbott, R-Texas, and other Republican governors on Thursday for their responses to COVID-19 and threatened to use his presidential powers to overrule their authority.

During a speech at the White House regarding his executive order to boost COVID-19 vaccinations, Biden called out the Americans who have not been vaccinated.

"This is a pandemic of the unvaccinated," said Biden. "And it's caused by the fact that despite America having [an] unprecedented and successful vaccination program, despite the fact that for almost five months, free vaccines have been available in more than 80,000 different locations, we still have nearly 80 million Americans who have failed to get the shot."

Biden then pivoted to go after governors who he believes are not enforcing adequately strict COVID-19 protocols.

 

BIDEN DECLARES SWEEPING NEW VACCINE MANDATE: 'THIS IS NOT ABOUT FREEDOM'

Companies with 100 employees or more ordered to vaccinate workers or test them weekly

President Joe Biden formally announced his plan to force companies with more than 100 employees to vaccinate workers against the coronavirus or test them weekly and dismissed concerns about encroaching on personal freedoms. 

"This is not about freedom or personal choice," Biden said during a Thursday address to the nation. "It's about protecting yourself and those around you, the people you work with, the people you care about, the people you love. My job as president is to protect all Americans."

In his speech, Biden expressed frustration with unvaccinated Americans multiple times and said that he "understands" the "anger" that the vaccinated have against those who have not taken the vaccine.

"We've been patient but our patience is wearing thin and your refusal has cost all of us," Biden told the tens of millions of unvaccinated people in the country. 

placeholder"Many of us are frustrated with the nearly 80 million Americans who are still not vaccinated, even though the vaccine is safe, effective and free," Biden added. "You might be confused about what is true and what is false about COVID-19."

The president also pointed a finger at Republican officials across the country who have opposed mask and vaccine mandates.

"We have the tools to combat COVID-19, and a distinct minority of Americans, supported by a distinct minority of elected officials, are keeping us from turning the corner," Biden said. "These pandemic politics are making people sick, causing unvaccinated people to die."

The president urged parents of children 12 and older to get vaccinated.

"They get vaccinated for a lot of things. That's it. Get them vaccinated."

Biden officially confirmed that he has instructed the Department of Labor to mandate employers with over 100 workers to either vaccinate them or force them to test for the virus weekly. 

The rule could affect up to 100 million workers and will also levy substantial fines, up to $14,000 per infraction, against companies that refuse to comply. 

In addition to the vaccination requirements, Biden is moving to double federal fines for airline passengers who refuse to wear masks on flights or to maintain face-covering requirements on federal property in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

The rule would also require that large companies provide time off.

 

"And to make matters worse, there are elected officials actively working to undermine the fight against COVID-19," he said. "Instead of encouraging people to get vaccinated and mask up, they’re ordering mobile morgues for the unvaccinated dying from COVID in their communities.

"Right now, local school officials are trying to keep children safe in a pandemic while their governor picks a fight with them and even threatens their salaries or their jobs. Talk about bullying in schools," Biden also said.

"If they’ll not help, if these governors won’t help us beat the pandemic, I’ll use my power as president to get them out of the way," he added.

Biden specifically promised to reimburse teachers "whose pay is withheld from doing the right thing" by enforcing his administration's mask mandates. "We will have that pay restored by the federal government, 100 percent. I promise you. I will have your back," he said.

DeSantis, who ordered masks to remain optional in Florida schools, filed an emergency appeal after a circuit court judge ruled that schools be allowed to impose mask mandates. School boards in 13 Florida districts have voted to require masks in defiance of the governor's order, to which the governor has responded by threatening to withhold their salaries.

Explaining he had no intention of immediately responding to Biden's speech, a spokesperson for DeSantis said the governor "is focused on working for the people of Florida and not getting into petty food fights," and directed Fox News to remarks he gave earlier Thursday laying out his views about federal COVID mandates.

"And I think that the more and more this has become coercive, where people have threatened mandates and firing and business consequences, the more it does that, I think the more people it alienates," DeSantis said in part. "I don't think it actually helps to get more people to ultimately do it, but I do not believe that people should lose their jobs over this issue, and we will fight that."

"If they try to do that through a rule like the Department of Labor, I don't think they have the legal authority to do that, but we obviously would want to support protections for people who were just trying to earn a living," he added.

In Texas, Abbott issued an executive order banning schools from imposing mask mandates, allowing individuals to choose whether they want to wear masks, a move met with backlash in the legal system.

Abbott responded to Biden's move on Thursday by tweeting, "Biden’s vaccine mandate is an assault on private businesses. I issued an Executive Order protecting Texans’ right to choose whether they get the COVID vaccine & added it to the special session agenda. Texas is already working to halt this power grab."

Biden's speech was immediately met with pushback from several other Republican governors who threatened to sue if his administration attempts to intrude on state sovereignty.

"My legal team is standing by ready to file our lawsuit the minute @joebiden files his unconstitutional rule," tweeted Gov. Kristi Noem, R-S.D. "This gross example of federal intrusion will not stand."

"I will pursue every legal option available to the state of Georgia to stop this blatantly unlawful overreach by the Biden administration," wrote Gov. Brian Kemp, R-Ga.

Gov. Henry McMaster, R-S.C., tweeted: "The American Dream has turned into a nightmare under President Biden and the radical Democrats. They have declared war against capitalism, thumbed their noses at the Constitution, and empowered our enemies abroad. Rest assured, we will fight them to the gates of hell to protect the liberty and livelihood of every South Carolinian."

Gov. Doug Ducey, R-Ariz., wrote, "This is exactly the kind of big government overreach we have tried so hard to prevent in Arizona — now the Biden-Harris administration is hammering down on private businesses and individual freedoms in an unprecedented and dangerous way. This will never stand up in court.

"This dictatorial approach is wrong, un-American and will do far more harm than good. How many workers will be displaced? How many kids kept out of classrooms? How many businesses fined? The vaccine is and should be a choice. We must and will push back."

 

ATTACHMENT ELEVEN – from the White House via New York Times

BIDEN’S SPEECH ON VACCINE MANDATES AND THE DELTA VARIANT: FULL TRANSCRIPT

“My message to unvaccinated Americans is this: What more is there to wait for?” President Biden said on Thursday. “We’ve been patient, but our patience is wearing thin.”

Published Sept. 9, 2021  Updated Sept. 10, 2021, 3:03 p.m. ET

 

The following is a transcript of President Biden’s remarks on Thursday about his administration’s push to mandate coronavirus vaccines for two-thirds of American workers as the Delta variant surges across the United States.

 

Good evening, my fellow Americans. I want to talk to you about where we are in the battle against Covid-19 — the progress we’ve made and the work we have left to do, and it starts in understanding this: Even as the Delta variant 19 has — Covid-19 has been hitting this country hard, we have the tools to combat the virus, if we can come together as a country and use those tools. If we raise our vaccination rate, protect ourselves and others with masking, expanding testing and identify people who are infected, we can and we will turn the tide on Covid-19.

It will take a lot of hard work, and it’s going to take some time. Many of us are frustrated with the nearly 80 million Americans who are still not vaccinated, even though the vaccine is safe, effective and free. You might be confused about what is true and what is false about Covid-19. So, before I outline the new steps to fight Covid-19 that I’m going to be announcing tonight, let me give you some clear information about where we stand.

First, we’ve made considerable progress in battling Covid-19. When I became president, about two million Americans were fully vaccinated. Today, over 175 million Americans have that protection. Before I took office, we hadn’t ordered enough vaccine for every American. Just weeks in office, we did. The week before I took office on Jan. 20 of this year, over 25,000 Americans died that week from Covid-19.

Last week, that grim weekly toll was down 70 percent. And then three months before I took office, our economy was faltering, creating just 50,000 jobs a month. We’re now averaging 700,000 new jobs a month in the past three months. This progress is real. But while America is in much better shape than it was seven months ago, when I took office, I need to tell you a second fact. We’re in the tough stretch, and it could last for a while.

Highly contagious Delta variant that I began to warn America back in July, spread late summer, like it did in other countries before us. While the vaccines provide strong protection for the vaccinated, we read about and hear about and we see the stories of hospitalized people, people on their death beds among the unvaccinated over the past few weeks. This is a pandemic of the unvaccinated.

And it’s caused by the fact that despite America having unprecedented and successful vaccination program — despite the fact that for almost five months, free vaccines have been available in 80,000 different locations — we still have nearly 80 million Americans who have failed to get the shot. And to make matters worse, there are elected officials actively working to undermine the fight against Covid-19. Instead of encouraging people to get vaccinated and mask up, they are ordering mobile morgues for the unvaccinated dying from Covid in our communities. This is totally unacceptable.

Third, if you wonder how all this adds up, here’s the math. The vast majority of Americans are doing the right thing. Nearly three-quarters of the eligible have gotten at least one shot. But one-quarter has not gotten any. That’s nearly 80 million Americans not vaccinated. In a country as large as ours, that’s 25 percent minority. That 25 percent can cause a lot of damage, and they are. The unvaccinated overcrowd our hospitals or overrun the emergency rooms and intensive care units, leaving no room for someone with a heart attack or pancreatitis or cancer.

And fourth, I want to emphasize that the vaccines provide very strong protection from Covid-19. I know there’s a lot of confusion and misinformation, but the world’s leading scientists confirm that if you’re fully vaccinated, your risk of severe illness from Covid-19 is very low. In fact, based on available data from the summer, only one out of every 160,000 fully vaccinated Americans was hospitalized for Covid per day. These are the facts.

So here’s where we stand. The path ahead, even with the Delta variant, is not nearly as bad as last winter. What makes it incredibly more frustrating is that we have the tools to combat Covid-19, and a distinct minority of Americans, supported by a distinct minority of elected officials, are keeping us from turning the corner. These pandemic politics, as I refer to, are making people sick, causing unvaccinated people to die.

We cannot allow these actions to stand in the way of the large majority of Americans who have done their part and want to get back to life as normal. As your president, I’m announcing tonight a new plan to require more Americans to be vaccinated to combat those blocking public health. My plan also increases testing, protects our economy and will make our kids safer in schools.

It consists of six broad areas of action and many specific measures of each of those actions that you can read more about at Whitehouse.govWhitehouse.gov. The measures, these are going to take time to have full impact. But if we implement them, I believe and the scientists indicate that the months ahead, we can reduce the number of unvaccinated Americans, decrease hospitalizations and deaths, and allow our children to go to school safely, and keep our economy strong by keeping businesses open.

First, we must increase vaccinations among the unvaccinated with new vaccination requirements. With nearly 80 million eligible Americans who have not gotten vaccinated, many said they were waiting for approval from the Food and Drug Administration, the F.D.A. Well, last month the F.D.A. granted that approval. So, the time for waiting is over.

This summer, we made progress through a combination of vaccine requirements and incentives as well as the F.D.A. approval. Four million more people got their first shot in August than they did in July. But we need to do more. This is not about freedom or personal choice. It’s about protecting yourself and those around you — the people you work with, the people you care about, the people you love.

My job as president is to protect all Americans. So tonight, I’m announcing that the Department of Labor is developing an emergency rule to require all employers with 100 or more employees that together employ over 80 million workers to ensure their work forces are fully vaccinated or show a negative test at least once a week.

Some of the biggest companies are already requiring this: United Airlines, Disney, Tyson Foods and even Fox News. The bottom line: We’re going to protect vaccinated workers from unvaccinated co-workers. We’re going to reduce the spread of Covid-19 by increasing the share of the work force that is vaccinated in businesses all across America.

My plan will extend the vaccination requirements that I previously issued in the health care field. Already, I’ve announced we’ll be requiring vaccinations that all nursing home workers who treat patients on Medicare and Medicaid, because I have that federal authority.

Tonight I’m using that same authority to expand that to cover those who work in hospitals, home health care facilities or other medical facilities. A total of 17 million health care workers. If you’re seeking care at a health facility, you should be able to know that the people treating you are vaccinated — simple, straightforward, period.

Next, I will sign an executive order that will now require all executive branch federal employees to be vaccinated — all. I’ve signed another executive order that will require federal contractors to do the same. If you want to work with the federal government and do business with us, get vaccinated. If you want to do business with the federal government, vaccinate your work force.

And tonight I’m removing one of the last remaining obstacles that make it difficult for you to get vaccinated. The Department of Labor will require employers with 100 or more workers to give those workers paid time off to get vaccinated. No one should lose pay in order to get vaccinated or take a loved one to get vaccinated.

Today, in total, the vaccine requirements in my plan will affect about 100 million Americans — two-thirds of all workers. And for other sectors, I issue this appeal: To those of you running large entertainment venues from sports arenas to concert venues to movie theaters, please require folks to get vaccinated or show a negative test as a condition of entry.

And to the nation’s family physicians, pediatricians, G.P.s — general practitioners — you’re the most trusted medical voice to your patients. You may be the one person who can get someone to change their mind about being vaccinated. Tonight, I’m asking each of you to reach out to your unvaccinated patients over the next two weeks and make a personal appeal to them to get the shot. America needs your personal involvement in this critical effort.

My message to unvaccinated Americans is this: What more is there to wait for? What more do you need to see? We’ve made vaccinations free, safe and convenient. The vaccine is F.D.A. approved. Over 200 million Americans have gotten at least one shot. We’ve been patient, but our patience is wearing thin. And your refusal has cost all of us.

So, please, do the right thing. But don’t just take it from me. Listen to the voices of unvaccinated Americans who are lying in hospital beds, taking their final breath, saying, “If only I had gotten vaccinated.” If only. It’s a tragedy. Please don’t let it become yours.

The second piece of my plan is continuing to protect the vaccinated. The vast majority of you who have gotten vaccinated, I understand your anger at those who haven’t gotten vaccinated. I understand the anxiety about getting a breakthrough case. But as the science makes clear, if you’re fully vaccinated, you’re highly protected from severe illness even if you get Covid-19.

In fact, recent data indicates there’s only one confirmed positive case per 5,000 fully vaccinated Americans per day. You’re as safe as possible, and we’re doing everything we can to keep it that way — keep it that way and keep you safe. That’s where boosters come in — the shots that give you even more protection than after your second shot.

Now, I know there’s been some confusion about boosters, so let me be clear. Last month, our top government doctors announced an initial plan for booster shots for vaccinated Americans. They believe that a booster is likely to provide the highest level of protection yet. Of course, the decision of which booster shots to give or when to start them and who will give them will be left completely to the scientists at the F.D.A. and the Centers for Disease Control.

But while we wait, we’ve done our part. We bought enough boosters, enough booster shots, and the distribution shot is ready to administer them. As soon as they are authorized, those eligible will be able to get a booster right away at tens of thousands of sites across the country — for most Americans, at your nearby drugstore and for free.

The third piece of my plan is keeping — and maybe the most important — is keeping our children safe and our schools open. For any parent, it doesn’t matter how low the risk of any illness or accident is when it comes to your child or grandchild. Trust me. I know. So, let me speak to you directly. Let me speak to you directly to help ease some of your worries.

It comes down to two separate categories: children ages 12 and older, who are eligible for a vaccine now, and children ages 11 and under, who are not yet eligible. The safest thing for your child 12 and older is to get them vaccinated. They get vaccinated for a lot of things. That’s it. Get them vaccinated.

As with the adults, almost all of the serious Covid-19 cases we’re seeing among adolescents are in unvaccinated 12- to 17-year-olds, an age group that lags behind in vaccination rates. So parents, please get your teenager vaccinated.

What about children under the age of 12 who can’t get vaccinated yet? Well, the best way for a parent to protect their child under the age of 12 starts at home. Every parent, every teen sibling, every caregiver around them should be vaccinated. Children have a four times higher chance of getting hospitalized if they live in a state with low vaccination rates rather than states with high vaccination rates.

Now if you’re a parent of a young child and you’re wondering when will it be, when will it be — the vaccine — available for them? I strongly support independent scientific review for vaccine uses for children under 12. We can’t take shortcuts of that scientific work.

But I’ve made it clear, I will do everything within my power to support the F.D.A. with any resource it needs to continue to do this as safely and as quickly as possible. And our nation’s top doctors are committed to keeping the public at large updated on the process so parents can plan.

Now to the schools. We know that if schools follow the science and implement the safety measures like testing, masking, adequate ventilation systems that we provided the money for, social distancing and vaccinations, then children can be safe from Covid-19 in schools. Today, about 90 percent of school staff and teachers are vaccinated. We should get that to 100 percent.

My administration has already required teachers at the schools run by the Defense Department — because I have the authority, as president, in the federal system, the Defense Department and the Interior Department — to get vaccinated. That’s the authority I possess. Tonight I’m announcing that we’ll require all of nearly 300,000 educators in the federal paid program, Head Start program, must be vaccinated as well to protect your youngest, our youngest, most precious Americans, and give parents the comfort.

And tonight I’m calling on all governors to require vaccinations for all teachers and staff. Some already have done so. We need more to step up. Vaccination requirements in schools are nothing new. They work. They are overwhelmingly supported by educators and their unions and all school officials trying do the right thing by our children. I’ll always be on your side.

Let me be blunt. My plan also takes on elected officials in states that are undermining you and these lifesaving actions. Right now, local school officials are trying to keep children safe in a pandemic while their governor picks a fight with them and even threatens their salaries or their jobs. Talk about bullying in schools.

If they will not help, if those governors won’t help us beat the pandemic, I’ll use my power as president to get them out of the way. The Department of Education has already begun to take legal action against states undermining protection that local school officials have ordered. Any teacher or school official whose pay is withheld for doing the right thing, we will have that pay restored by the federal government, 100 percent. I promise you, I will have your back.

The fourth piece of my plan is increasing testing and masking. From the start, America has failed to do enough Covid-19 testing. In order to better detect and control the Delta variant, I’m taking steps tonight to make testing more available, more affordable and more convenient. I’ll use the Defense Production Act to increase production of rapid tests, including those that you can use at home.

While that production is ramping up, my administration has worked with top retailers like Walmart, Amazon and Kroger, and tonight we’re announcing that no later than next week each of these outlets will start to sell at-home rapid test kits at cost for the next three months.

This is immediate price reduction for at-home test kits for up to 35 percent reduction. We’ll also expand free testing at 10,000 pharmacies around the country. And we’ll commit, we’re committing $2 billion to purchase nearly 300 million rapid tests for distribution to community health centers, food banks, schools, so that every American, no matter their income, can access free and convenient tests.

This is important to everyone, particularly for a parent or a child — with a child not old enough to be vaccinated. You’ll be able to test them at home and test those around them. In addition to testing, we know masking helps stop the spread of Covid-19. That’s why when I came into office, I required masks for all federal buildings and on federal lands, on airlines and other modes of transportation.

Today, tonight, I’m announcing that the Transportation Safety Administration, the T.S.A., will double the fines on travelers that refuse to mask. If you break the rules, be prepared to pay. And by the way, show some respect. The anger you see on television toward flight attendants and others doing their jobs is wrong. It’s ugly.

The fifth piece of my plan is protecting our economic recovery. Because of our vaccination program, and the American Rescue Plan, which we passed early in my administration, we’ve had record job creation for a new administration. Economic growth unmatched in 40 years. We cannot let unvaccinated do this progress — undo it. Turn it back. So tonight I’m announcing additional steps to strengthen our economic recovery.

We’ll be expanding Covid-19 economic injury disaster loan programs. That’s a program that’s going to allow small businesses to borrow up to $2 million, from the current $500,000, to keep going if Covid-19 impacts on their sales. These low-interest, long-term loans require no repayment for two years and can be used to hire and retain workers, purchase inventory or even pay down higher-cost debt racked up since the pandemic began. I’ll also be taking additional steps to help small businesses stay afloat during the pandemic.

Sixth, we’re going to continue to improve the care of those who do get Covid-19. In early July, I announced the deployment of surge response teams. These are teams comprised of experts from the Department of Health and Human Services, the C.D.C., the Defense Department and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, to areas in the country that need help to stem the spread of Covid-19. Since then, the federal government has deployed nearly 1,000 staff including doctors, nurses, paramedics, into 18 states. Today, I’m announcing that the Defense Department will double the number of military health teams that they will deploy to help their fellow Americans and hospitals around the country.

Additionally, we’re increasing the availability of new medicines recommended by real doctors, not conspiracy theorists. The monoclonal antibody treatments have been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization by up to 70 percent for unvaccinated people at risk of developing severe disease. We’ve already distributed 1.4 million courses of these treatments to save lives and reduce the strain on hospitals. Tonight, I’m announcing we’ll increase the average pace of shipment across the country of free monoclonal antibody treatments by another 50 percent.

Before I close, let me say this: Communities of color are disproportionately impacted by this virus. As we continue to battle Covid-19, we will ensure that equity continues to be at the center of our response. We’ll ensure that everyone is reached. My first responsibility as president is to protect the American people and make sure we have enough vaccine for every American, including enough boosters for every American who’s approved to get one.

We also know this virus transcends borders. That’s why even as we execute this plan at home we need to continue fighting the virus overseas, continue to be the arsenal of vaccines. We’re proud to have donated nearly 140 million vaccines to over 90 countries, more than all other countries combined — including Europe, China and Russia combined. That’s American leadership on a global stage, and that’s just the beginning. We’ve also now started to ship another 500 million Covid vaccines, Pfizer vaccines, purchased to donate to 100 lower-income countries in need of vaccines, and I’ll be announcing additional steps to help the rest of the world later this month.

As I recently released the key parts of my pandemic preparedness plan so that America isn’t caught flat-footed with a new pandemic comes again, as it will. Next month I’m also going to release a plan in greater detail.

So let me close with this: We’ve made so much progress during the past seven months of this pandemic. The recent increases in vaccinations in August already are having an impact in some states, where case counts are dropping in recent days. Even so, we remain at a critical moment, a critical time. We have the tools. Now we just have to finish the job with truth, with science, with confidence, and together as one nation.

Look, we’re the United States of America. There’s nothing, not a single thing we’re unable to do if we do it together. So let’s stay together.

God bless you all, and all those who continue to serve of on the front lines of this pandemic, and may God protect our troops.

Get vaccinated.